• neurons
  • Norepinephrine is also released from postganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system , to transmit the fight-or-flight response in each tissue respectively. (wikidoc.org)
  • Measuring LC activity concomitantly with behavior provides useful information on the functions of the LC norepinephrine (NE) neurons, although it must be borne in mind that any correlative study of this sort does not establish the overall significance of the LC in particular behavioral processes. (acnp.org)
  • sympathetic
  • To determine the role of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system in the persistent tachycardia caused by the antihypertensive drug hydralazine, we examined the temporal relationships between the changes in heart rate and plasma norepinephrine concentration and the reduction in blood pressure produced by a range of doses of hydralazine administered intravenously to five hypertensive patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • The temporal discordance of the changes of both heart rate and plasma norepinephrine relative to the reduction in blood pressure and the significant linear correlation between the increases in heart rate and plasma norepinephrine concentration suggest that continued activation of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system contributes to the persistent tachycardia seen after the administration of hydralazine. (ahajournals.org)
  • SNRA
  • A closely related type of drug is a serotonin-norepinephrine releasing agent (SNRA), for instance the withdrawn appetite suppressant fenfluramine/phentermine (Fen-Phen). (wikipedia.org)
  • Fenfluramine/phentermine (Fen-Phen), a combination formulation of fenfluramine, a serotonin releasing agent, and phentermine, a norepinephrine releasing agent, is a functional SNRA that was formerly used as an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • increases
  • When norepinephrine acts as a drug it increases blood pressure by increasing vascular tone through α-adrenergic receptor activation. (wikidoc.org)
  • Significant linear correlations were found between the increases in heart rate and plasma norepinephrine concentration and the reduction in blood pressure at 15 and 30 minutes after injection. (ahajournals.org)
  • In the rest of the body, norepinephrine increases heart rate and blood pressure, triggers the release of glucose from energy stores, increases blood flow to skeletal muscle, reduces blood flow to the gastrointestinal system, and inhibits voiding of the bladder and gastrointestinal motility. (wikipedia.org)
  • SNDRAs
  • They are also very similar to serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agents (SNDRAs) like MDMA ("ecstasy") and α-ethyltryptamine (αET) for the same reason, although they act via a different mechanism and have differing physiological and qualitative effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • amino
  • A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a genetic variation in which a genome sequence is altered by a single nucleotide (A, T, C or G). NET proteins with an altered amino acid sequence (more specifically, a missense mutation) could potentially be associated with various diseases that involve abnormally high or low plasma levels of norepinephrine due to altered NET function. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • Using norepinephrine together with racepinephrine may increase cardiovascular side effects such as elevations in heart rate and blood pressure or irregular heart rhythm. (drugs.com)
  • Beta blockers, which counter some of the effects of norepinephrine, are frequently used to treat glaucoma, migraine, and a range of cardiovascular problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alpha blockers, which counter a different set of norepinephrine effects, are used to treat several cardiovascular and psychiatric conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • drugs
  • Many important psychiatric drugs exert strong effects on norepinephrine systems in the brain, resulting in side-effects that may be helpful or harmful. (wikipedia.org)