• inert
  • A common normally colorless, odorless, tasteless and mostly inert diatomic non-metal gas, nitrogen constitutes 78 percent of earth 's atmosphere and is a constituent of all living tissues. (fact-index.com)
  • narcotic effects of respiratory nitrogen at elevated partial pressures Narcosis while diving (also known as nitrogen narcosis, inert gas narcosis, raptures of the deep, Martini effect) is a reversible alteration in consciousness that occurs while diving at depth. (wikipedia.org)
  • decomposition
  • In this case study, you are asked to make qualitative observations about the effect of temperature on the decomposition of nitrogen pentoxide. (shodor.org)
  • The decomposition of NI3 proceeds as follows to give nitrogen gas and iodine: 2 NI3 (s) → N2 (g) + 3 I2 (g) (−290 kJ/mol) However, the dry material is a contact explosive, decomposing approximately as follows: 8 NI3 · NH3 → 5 N2 + 6 NH4I + 9 I2 Consistent with this equation, these explosions leave orange-to-purple stains of iodine, which can be removed with sodium thiosulfate solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nitrogen cycle is of particular interest to ecologists because nitrogen availability can affect the rate of key ecosystem processes, including primary production and decomposition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organic nitrogen may be in the form of a living organism, humus or in the intermediate products of organic matter decomposition. (wikipedia.org)
  • amounts
  • Different kinds of garden plants need different amounts of actual nitrogen over a season. (garden.org)
  • Nitrogen trichloride can form in small amounts when public water supplies are disinfected with monochloramine, and in swimming pools by disinfecting chlorine reacting with urea in urine and sweat from bathers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trichloride
  • Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen trichloride, trademarked as Agene, was used to artificially bleach and age flour, but was banned in 1949: In humans Agene was found to cause severe and widespread neurological disorders leading to its banning in 1947. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen trichloride can irritate mucous membranes-it is a lachrymatory agent, but has never been used as such. (wikipedia.org)
  • trifluoride
  • Nitrogen trifluoride is the halide carrier gas, which releases fluoride ions when impacted by electrons: NF3 + e− → NF2 + F− The free fluoride ion goes on to react with xenon cations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen trifluoride is the inorganic compound with the formula NF3. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen trifluoride is an extremely strong greenhouse gas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen trifluoride is a rare example of a binary fluoride that can be prepared directly from the elements only at very uncommon conditions, such as electric discharge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today nitrogen trifluoride is predominantly employed in the cleaning of the PECVD chambers in the high-volume production of liquid-crystal displays and silicon-based thin-film solar cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen trifluoride can be used as well with tungsten silicide, and tungsten produced by CVD. (wikipedia.org)
  • Elemental fluorine has been introduced as an environmentally friendly replacement for nitrogen trifluoride in the manufacture of flat-panel displays and thin-film solar cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • pure nitrogen
  • In an atmosphere of pure nitrogen, animals died and flames were extinguished. (wikipedia.org)
  • Where the solid is not pure nitrogen, the vapour pressure can be estimated using Raoult's law in which the pressure is reduced by the molar concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Give a definition for each of the following and explain where each occurs in the nitrogen cycle. (furman.edu)
  • What occurs when a plant is under nitrogen stress (too little nitrogen)? (furman.edu)
  • It occurs naturally in ice caps on Earth, and is believed to be important in the outer Solar System on moons such as Titan and Triton which have a cold nitrogen atmosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • others require intermediate nitrogen-fixers (like fungi) to turn the nitrogen into a usable form. (harvard.edu)
  • For human bones, the assumption of about 5% nitrogen in the bone, mostly in the form of collogen, allows fairly consistent dating techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen mustards (NMs) form cyclic aminium ions (aziridinium rings) by intramolecular displacement of the chloride by the amine nitrogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solid nitrogen is the solid form of the element nitrogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even at the low temperatures of solid nitrogen it is fairly volatile and can sublime to form an atmosphere, or condense back into nitrogen frost. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared to other materials, solid nitrogen loses cohesion at low pressures and flows in the form of glaciers when amassed. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the temperature is raised to 113K the amorphous phase changes to a crystalline form, and trapped nitrogen converts some ice into a clathrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The processes of the nitrogen cycle transform nitrogen from one form to another. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many of those processes are carried out by microbes, either in their effort to harvest energy or to accumulate nitrogen in a form needed for their growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagram besides shows how these processes fit together to form the nitrogen cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a plant or animal dies or an animal expels waste, the initial form of nitrogen is organic. (wikipedia.org)
  • soluble
  • A 100 pound bag of 10-10-10 contains 10 pounds of nitrogen (as well as 10 percent phosphoric acid and 10 percent soluble potash). (garden.org)
  • If the fertilizer you're using contains mostly water soluble nitrogen, apply no more than 1 pound of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet at one time. (garden.org)
  • atmosphere
  • Another way to produce it, without using applied pressure, is to first make amorphous solid water by condensing water vapour at 77 K. This absorbs nitrogen gas at a pressure of 1 atmosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • nitrates
  • The name nitrogène was suggested by French chemist Jean-Antoine-Claude Chaptal in 1790, when it was found that nitrogen was present in nitric acid and nitrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • organic
  • You can safely apply more than that if you're using an organic fertilizer (derived from plant or animal waste), a fertilizer that contains mostly water insoluble nitrogen, or a controlled-release fertilizer. (garden.org)
  • Therefore
  • Therefore, to apply 10 pounds of actual nitrogen, you need to apply 1,000 pounds of the 1 percent nitrogen material, or 22 pounds of the one with 46 percent nitrogen. (garden.org)
  • As with all types of mustard gas, nitrogen mustards are powerful and persistent blister agents and the main examples (HN1, HN2, HN3, see below) are therefore classified as Schedule 1 substances within the Chemical Weapons Convention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, measuring nitrogen inputs and losses can be used to study protein metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • temperatures
  • The bulk modulus of s-N2 is 2.16 GPa at 20 K, and 1.47 GPa at 44 K. At temperatures below 30 K solid nitrogen will undergo brittle failure, particularly if strain is applied quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • soils
  • There's a lot of emphasis on corn with nitrogen now, making sure it has enough nitrogen all throughout the growing season," said Glen Harris, a soils and fertility agronomist with the University of Georgia Tifton campus. (uga.edu)
  • When we get that much rain, our soils are so sandy, we usually don't count on having a lot of nitrogen left over next year. (uga.edu)
  • fluorine
  • Some studies compare nitrogen dating results with dating results from methods like fluorine absorption dating to create more accurate estimates. (wikipedia.org)
  • sulfur
  • For example, we like to put 10 pounds of sulfur on, and that's fine, but if you put a lot of nitrogen on, you're probably going to have a sulfur deficiency. (uga.edu)
  • The more nitrogen you put on, you have to bump up that recommendation for sulfur, too. (uga.edu)