• various neuropeptides
  • We employ genetic, molecular, anatomical, viral, optogenetic and behavioral approaches to study the effects of addressed axonal release of various neuropeptides within the distinct brain regions controlling stress and fear responses, maternal and social behavior. (dkfz.de)
  • molecular
  • Our laboratory is focused on the dissection of the mechanisms of neuropeptide action in the brain, from molecular via anatomical to the whole organism level. (dkfz.de)
  • behavior
  • 2011). Critical role of neuropeptides B/W receptor 1 signaling in social behavior and fear memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major contributors in the control of food intake include behavioral response to the environment, hedonic behavior, and metabolism: nutrient sensors, neuropeptide hormones, and peripheral hormones. (springer.com)
  • neuronal
  • These neuronal circuits include many neuropeptide hormones and peptide hormones coming from the periphery, all acting in concert in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. (springer.com)
  • hypothalamic
  • Following the isolation of neuropeptide-y (NPY) from the porcine hypothalamus in 1982, researchers began to speculate about the involvement of NPY in hypothalamic-mediated functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypothalamus
  • High concentrations of Neuropeptide Y synthesis and action have been found in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, specifically in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and dentate gyrus. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • The dentate gyrus is significantly involved in cell proliferation, a process modulated by various internal factors including Neuropeptide Y. Reduction or elimination of NPY released by interneurons decreased cell growth in this brain area. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Furthermore, our group uses animal models of psychiatric diseases, including anxiety disorders and autism, to study the possible contribution of neuropeptides to the pathogenesis of the respective human diseases. (dkfz.de)
  • In contrast with rat and cow brains, the human brain contains larger amounts of neuropeptide K. Dornan WA, Vink KL, Malen P, Short K, Struthers W, Barrett C (August 1993). (wikipedia.org)