• posterior spinal fusion
  • In this case, I would have likely performed a posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation from C7 to T6 with a lateral extracavitary resection of T2 and T3 and anterior reconstruction using a titanium cage filled with iliac crest bone graft. (spineuniverse.com)
  • The past medical history was remarkable for a posterior spinal fusion 8 months previously, and seizures that were controlled by Depakote┬«(divalproex sodium). (pediatriceducation.org)
  • vertebral
  • Most common causes include iatrogenic lumbar punctures, burst fractures resulting in posterior migration of fragments of the vertebral body, severe disc herniations, spinal anaesthesia involving trauma from catheters and high local anaesthetic concentrations around the cauda equina, penetrating trauma such as knife wounds or ballistic trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain infections can also lead to the development of Kyphoscoliosis such as vertebral tuberculosis or general tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • cervical
  • At 5 cm of cervical dilatation, she benefitted from combined spinal-epidural analgesia with strict aseptic conditions. (asahq.org)
  • 1) To examine whether the Klein-Bell ADL Scale (K-B Scale) discriminates cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in daily activities and to explore its applicability in this group of patients. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Onset
  • The most grave among them is late-onset myelopathy due to a stretch of the spinal cord over an internal gibbus. (jcorth.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Occurrence of nonprogressive juvenile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) predominantly in males suggests a possibility of X-linked disorder but there is no such report addressing this problem. (biomedsearch.com)
  • anterior
  • Historically, anterior decompression followed by posterior fusion has been the surgical management of choice in spinal tuberculosis. (scielo.org.za)
  • Decompression and anterior spinal fusion were performed. (uwi.edu)
  • Poliomyelitis, or gray matter myelitis, is usually caused by infection of anterior horn of the spinal cord by the enteroviruses (polioviruses, enteroviruses (EV) 70 and 71, echoviruses, coxsackieviruses A and B) and the flaviviruses (West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Myelitis is inflammation of the spinal cord which can disrupt the normal responses from the brain to the rest of the body, and from the rest of the body to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between Jan 1, 2014, and April 11, 2015 it performed well in a phase II clinical trial Estradiol, estriol, and estrogen receptors(ER): Estrogens have been shown to be antiinflammatory and neuroprotective in a variety of neurological disease models and it is known that they work also in presence of inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorders
  • As with cancer and tuberculosis, is it possible that our current attitudes as to the incurability and hopelessness of neurological disorders are hampering the fight to convert these into chronic but treatable conditions? (bmj.com)
  • Spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disease - do these disorders represent the new frontier in the redefining the boundaries of possibility? (bmj.com)
  • A congenital kyphosis can also suddenly appear in teenage years, more commonly in children with cerebral palsy and other neurological disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • kyphosis
  • Congenital kyphosis (Q76.4) can result in infants whose spinal column has not developed correctly in the womb. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of serious complications from spinal fusion surgery for kyphosis is estimated to be 5%, similar to the risks of surgery for scoliosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • skeletal
  • Spinal tuberculosis is the most common infection affecting the skeletal system in our country, and if incorrectly treated, can have devastating and permanent sequelae. (jcorth.com)
  • nerve
  • Magnetic resonance imaging ( fig. 1 ) and computed tomography were performed and revealed a displacement of the nerve roots by an expansive mass in the posterior extradural space, which took up more than 50% of the spinal canal. (asahq.org)
  • Types include: A cranial nerve root is the initial or proximal segment of one of the twelve pairs of cranial nerves leaving the central nervous system from the brain stem or the highest levels of the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each spinal nerve is formed by the union of a sensory dorsal root and a motor ventral root, meaning that there are sixty-two dorsal/ventral root pairs, and therefore one hundred and twenty four nerve roots in total, each of which stem from a bundle of nerve rootlets (or root filaments). (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage to nerve roots can cause paresis and paralysis of the muscle innervated by the affected spinal nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the conus medullaris, the canal contains a mass of nerves (the cauda equina or "horse-tail") that branches off the lower end of the spinal cord and contains the nerve roots from L1-5 and S1-5. (wikipedia.org)
  • The area of skin innervated by a specific spinal nerve is called a dermatome, and the group of muscles innervated by a single spinal nerve is called a myotome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tay-Sachs disease is a genetic disorder that results in the destruction of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • injuries
  • Stab injuries of the Spinal Cord: A retrospective study of clinical findings and MRI changes. (ucthospital.co.za)
  • Injuries can occur at any level of the spinal cord and can be classified as complete injury, a total loss of sensation and muscle function, or incomplete, meaning some nervous signals are able to travel past the injured area of the cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • dysfunction
  • In the case of myelitis, not only is the immune system dysfunctional, but the dysfunction also crosses this protective blood brain barrier to affect the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebral
  • It crosses the blood brain barrier to achieve concentrations in the cerebral-spinal fluid equivalent to plasma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surgery
  • Current recommendations for spinal tuberculosis (TB) not requiring open surgery include core needle biopsy to confirm TB and determine drug sensitivity. (scielo.org.za)
  • Before the spinal surgery she had reflux 1-2 times/day. (pediatriceducation.org)
  • These types of high-end curves typically do not respond well to conservative treatment and almost always warrant spinal fusion surgery, which can restore the body's natural degree of curvature. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 504-bed facility is also highly regarded for its Comprehensive Stroke Center, the New Jersey Cardiovascular Institute (NJCI), the cochlear Implant Program, a neurosurgical intensive care unit and a special Brain Tumor Program, the Neurological Institute of New Jersey, a federally designated spinal cord injury program and The University Center for Bloodless Surgery and Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • The emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis and HIV has turned this age old infection into a deadly and terrifying disease. (jcorth.com)
  • 16 Spinal TB produces an indolent and slow-growing infection 17 and is characteristically paucibacillary. (scielo.org.za)
  • Intensive Care
  • It has a seven story ICU tower comprising surgical, medical-neurological and cardiac intensive care units, as well as the George D. Peak Memorial Burn and Wound Center, the only burn ICU in Mid-Missouri. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • The term 'incurable' was typically reserved for chronic diseases which required long-term care, such as cancer or tuberculosis 3 . (bmj.com)
  • traumatic
  • Spinal cord injury can be traumatic or nontraumatic, and can be classified into three types based on cause: mechanical forces, toxic, and ischemic (from lack of blood flow). (wikipedia.org)
  • strengthen
  • Physical Therapy's primary objective is to strengthen the spinal tissues for either correcting the curvature to the maximum extent possible or contain further damage. (wikipedia.org)