• connective tissue
  • collagen f's ( collagenous f's ) the soft, flexible, white fibers that are the most characteristic constituent of all types of connective tissue, consisting of the protein collagen, and composed of bundles of fibrils that are in turn made up of smaller units ( microfibrils ) that show a characteristic crossbanding with a major periodicity of 65 nm. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The localization of peptidergic, catecholaminergic, and nitroxidergic nerve fibers in the ventral leptomeningeal connective tissue compartment was studied in whole-mount preparations and serial semithin and ultrathin sections. (semanticscholar.org)
  • CGRP- and SP-IR nerve fibers are localized in all three leptomeningeal compartments where they terminate close to the subarachnoid space (type 1) or within the connective tissue (type 2). (semanticscholar.org)
  • The pulp contains the blood vessels the nerves and connective tissue inside a tooth and provides the tooth's blood and nutrients. (wikipedia.org)
  • signals
  • signals along various nerves. (slideserve.com)
  • A nerve cell communicates information to distant targets by sending electrical signals down a long, thin part of the cell called the axon. (nih.gov)
  • CIPA is caused by a genetic mutation which prevents the formation of nerve cells which are responsible for transmitting signals of pain, heat, and cold to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The inner hair cells transform the sound vibrations in the fluids of the cochlea into electrical signals that are then relayed via the auditory nerve to the auditory brainstem and to the auditory cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simplified, nerve fibers' signals are transported by bushy cells to the binaural areas in the olivary complex, while signal peaks and valleys are noted by stellate cells, and signal timing is extracted by octopus cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the response is the whole body response, as in sympathetic fight or flight, the signals are distributed to other spinal nerves by way of gray rami communicantes which serve as conduits between the spinal nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • They send these signals by means of an axon, which is a thin protoplasmic fiber that extends from the cell body and projects, usually with numerous branches, to other areas, sometimes nearby, sometimes in distant parts of the brain or body. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood vessels
  • In normal skin the epidermis is heavily innervated by nerve fibers immunoreactive for protein gene product (PGP) 9.5, whereas fibers immunoreactive for substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are typically associated with blood vessels. (jneurosci.org)
  • The ophthalmic nerve (V1) carries sensory information from the scalp and forehead, the upper eyelid, the conjunctiva and cornea of the eye, the nose (including the tip of the nose, except alae nasi), the nasal mucosa, the frontal sinuses and parts of the meninges (the dura and blood vessels). (wikipedia.org)
  • spinal cord
  • The peripheral nerves lie outside the brain and spinal cord and supply the muscles and sensory organs in the limbs. (nih.gov)
  • Because the frog spinal cord is relatively simpler and easier to remove, and the relationships between the nerve roots are more apparent, that shift simplified Müller's design and allowed for better reproducibility of the experiment as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • degeneration
  • These data show that sensory dysfunction after capsaicin application to the skin results from rapid degeneration of intracutaneous nerve fibers. (jneurosci.org)
  • However, previous work has uncovered widespread loss of cochlear afferent synapses and progressive cochlear nerve degeneration in noise-exposed ears with recovered thresholds and no hair cell loss ( Kujawa and Liberman 2009 ). (jneurosci.org)
  • The degeneration of motor nerves results in muscle weakness and atrophy in the extremities (arms, legs, hands, or feet), and in some cases the degeneration of sensory nerves results in a reduced ability to feel heat, cold, and pain. (nih.gov)
  • Examinations of the nerve structure and function showed signs of neuronal degeneration such as a marked reduction in the number of myelinated fibers and axonal loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • axonal
  • The numbers of axonal telodendria (the branching structures at the end of the axon) can also differ from one nerve fiber to the next. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Direct injury to a nerve, interruption of its blood supply resulting in (ischemia), or inflammation also may cause mononeuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • sympathetic
  • adrenergic f's nerve fibers of the sympathetic nervous system that liberate norepinephrine (and possibly small amounts of epinephrine ) at a synapse when a nerve impulse passes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Each spinal nerve receives a branch called a gray ramus communicans (plural rami communicantes) from the adjacent paravertebral ganglion of the sympathetic trunk. (wikipedia.org)
  • From here, the postganglionic sympathetic neuron can travel back out the grey ramus communicans of that level to the mixed spinal nerve and on to the effector organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • adrenergic
  • Our objective in this study was to evaluate the correlation between C-fiber involvement as shown by skin biopsy and adrenergic cardiac metaiodobenzylguanadine (MIBG) uptake in POTS patients. (wiley.com)
  • sciatic nerve
  • Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. (nih.gov)
  • BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. (nih.gov)
  • A: 1% Capsaicin or vehicle was applied onto the sciatic nerve and Evans Blue extravasation was measured 24 hours later. (nih.gov)
  • 0.01 compared to naïve, n = 5-9 per group.B: 1% Capsaicin was applied to the sciatic nerve and Evans Blue was injected immediately after capsaicin. (nih.gov)
  • effector
  • The MOC fibers form the effector arm of a sound-evoked inhibitory reflex that performs rapid (within tens of milliseconds) automatic gain-control on the mechanical amplifier powered by OHC electromotility. (jneurosci.org)
  • intraepidermal
  • Mean intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density was in the lower normal age-adjusted range, 7.2 ± 2.9/mm (normal ≥7/mm), and was slightly below the normal range in 45% of POTS patients. (wiley.com)
  • This skin punch biopsy measurement technique is called intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). (wikipedia.org)
  • itch
  • However, rigorous psychophysical and neurophysiological evidence for a functional role of A-fibers in the mediation of nonhistaminergic itch in primates is lacking. (jneurosci.org)
  • In addition, it has not been explored if C- and A-fibers mediate different qualities of the itch percept. (jneurosci.org)
  • In psychophysical experiments, we used a selective conduction block of myelinated fibers to test the hypothesis that activity in A-fibers contributes to cowhage-induced itch. (jneurosci.org)
  • posterior
  • That particular experiment was performed out by severing the anterior and posterior roots of spinal nerves in different combinations of several dogs in a litter of puppies. (wikipedia.org)
  • One procedure was carried out by first severing posterior roots of the spinal nerve leading to the leg. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibres
  • Therefore, it is possible that pruritoceptive nerve fibres have different classes of fibres, which is unclear in current research. (wikipedia.org)
  • action potentials
  • The neurotransmitters diffuse across the narrow space between the hair cell and a nerve terminal, where they then bind to receptors and thus trigger action potentials in the nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • Motor nerves cause muscles to contract and control voluntary muscle activity such as speaking, walking, breathing, and swallowing. (nih.gov)
  • The motor component of the mandibular division (V3) of the trigeminal nerve controls the movement of eight muscles, including the four muscles of mastication: the masseter, the temporal and the medial and lateral pterygoids. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuropathy
  • Daniel J. Clauw , What is the meaning of "small fiber neuropathy" in fibromyalgia? (wiley.com)
  • Given the allodynia present, and the increasing evidence of small fiber neuropathy in FM, the skin is becoming an ever more intriguing place to look in fibromyalgia. (sott.net)
  • Low levels mitochondria have also been associated with small fiber neuropathy - a condition that appears to occur in about 40% of people with fibromyalgia. (sott.net)
  • CMT, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peroneal muscular atrophy, comprises a group of disorders that affect peripheral nerves. (nih.gov)
  • The neuropathy of CMT affects both motor and sensory nerves. (nih.gov)
  • Small fiber peripheral neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy that occurs from damage to the small unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sensory symptoms of small fiber neuropathy are highly variable. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many possible causes of small fiber neuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent study revealed dysfunction of a particular sodium channel (Nav1.7) in a significant portion of the patient population with an idiopathic small fiber neuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently several studies have suggested an association between autonomic small fiber neuropathy and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy often requires ancillary testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any value measured below the 0.05 Quantile IENFD values per age span, is considered a reliable positive diagnosis for Small Fiber Peripheral Neuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neuropathy Polyneuropathy Wartenbergs migratory sensory neuropathy Burning feet syndrome Overview of Small Fiber Neuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mononeuropathy is a type of neuropathy that only affects a single nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common cause of mononeuropathy is physical compression of the nerve, known as compression neuropathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Muscle
  • Fourteen subjects (7 female, 7 male) were each given two to four control tests with cowhage on the dorsum of the hand within the anticipated autonomous zone of the superficial branch of the radial nerve (in the region of the interosseus muscle and extending to the base of the thumb and adjacent two fingers). (jneurosci.org)
  • In rare cases, the disease is accompanied with nerve deafness and muscle wasting. (wikipedia.org)