• Humans
  • The qualitative relationship between carcinogenicity and mutagenicity (DNA-damaging activity), based on chemicals which are known to be or suspected of being carcinogenic to man and/or to experimental animals, is analyzed using 532 chemicals evaluated in Volumes 1-25 of the IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Risk of Chemicals to Humans. (biomedsearch.com)
  • tumor
  • In spite of convincing evidence of tumor inhibition, no regression of established neoplasms under therapy was observed, and the viability of inhibited cells was unimpaired, as indicated by their ability to reproduce normally on subsequent transplantation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Researchers are interested in combining sorafenib with the experimental drug TRC105, which has been designed to block the growth of blood vessels that lead to tumor growth, in order to determine whether this drug combination stops tumor growth and reduces tumor size better than sorafenib alone. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Neoplasm is an abnormal growth of tissue which, if it forms a mass, is commonly referred to as a tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Secondary neoplasm refers to any of a class of cancerous tumor that is either a metastatic offshoot of a primary tumor, or an apparently unrelated tumor that increases in frequency following certain cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current English, however, both medical and non-medical, uses tumor as a synonym for a neoplasm (a solid or fluid-filled cystic lesion that may or may not be formed by an abnormal growth of neoplastic cells) that appears enlarged in size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymphoma
  • For lymphoid neoplasms, e.g. lymphoma and leukemia, clonality is proven by the amplification of a single rearrangement of their immunoglobulin gene (for B cell lesions) or T cell receptor gene (for T cell lesions). (wikipedia.org)
  • Neoplastic
  • Rarely there can be a metastatic neoplasm with no known site of the primary cancer and this is classed as a cancer of unknown primary origin Neoplastic tumors are often heterogeneous and contain more than one type of cell, but their initiation and continued growth is usually dependent on a single population of neoplastic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Although there are many kinds of NETs, they are treated as a group of tissue because the cells of these neoplasms share common features, such as looking similar, having special secretory granules, and often producing biogenic amines and polypeptide hormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • analysis
  • Entire arrays may have obvious flaws detectable by visual inspection, pairwise comparisons to arrays in the same experimental group, or by analysis of RNA degradation. (wikipedia.org)