• 1986
  • Inspired by Feynman's concepts, K. Eric Drexler used the term "nanotechnology" in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which proposed the idea of a nanoscale "assembler" which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items of arbitrary complexity with atomic control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also in 1986, Drexler co-founded The Foresight Institute (with which he is no longer affiliated) to help increase public awareness and understanding of nanotechnology concepts and implications. (wikipedia.org)
  • K. Eric Drexler's 1986 book Engines of Creation introduced the general public to the concept of nanotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemistry
  • The Nanotechnology Systems program - the first such diploma in Canada - provides a strong foundation of electronics, material science, instrumentation, chemistry and biochemistry, supported by courses in ethics and communications. (nait.ca)
  • MNT would involve combining physical principles demonstrated by biophysics, chemistry, other nanotechnologies, and the molecular machinery of life with the systems engineering principles found in modern macroscale factories. (wikipedia.org)
  • While conventional chemistry uses inexact processes obtaining inexact results, and biology exploits inexact processes to obtain definitive results, molecular nanotechnology would employ original definitive processes to obtain definitive results. (wikipedia.org)
  • In molecular nanotechnology, chemosynthesis is any chemical synthesis where reactions occur due to random thermal motion, a class which encompasses almost all of modern synthetic chemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • nanoscale
  • In his 1956 short story The Next Tenants, Arthur C. Clarke describes tiny machines that operate at the micrometre scale - although not strictly nanoscale (billionth of a meter), they are the first fictional example of the concepts now associated with nanotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • inherently
  • There is some overlap of Biotechnology and Wet nanotechnology because living things are inherently bottom-up engineered and any exploitation of this by biotechnologists means they dabble in bottom-up engineering (though mostly at the level of producing macromolecules like proteins and nucleic acids from there monomer units. (wikipedia.org)
  • biotechnology
  • The application of nanotechnology is everywhere - from biopharmaceuticals to biotechnology, electronics to semiconductor fabrication, material and environmental sciences to biochemistry, as well as information storage, energy, medicine, security, food and so much more. (genesee.edu)
  • stakeholders
  • UK stakeholders can keep up to date with the latest nanotechnology terminology, health and safety issues, product labelling and materials specifications with BSI guidance and Standards. (tsoshop.co.uk)
  • The NIA works with regulators and stakeholders on the national, European and international levels so as to secure a supportive environment for the continuing advancement and establishment of nanotechnologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Feynman's
  • These and other developments hint that the retroactive rediscovery of Feynman's "Plenty of Room" gave nanotechnology a packaged history that provided an early date of December 1959, plus a connection to the charisma and genius of Richard Feynman. (wikipedia.org)
  • Feynman's stature as a Nobel laureate and as an iconic figure in 20th century science surely helped advocates of nanotechnology and provided a valuable intellectual link to the past. (wikipedia.org)
  • principles
  • The field's name specifically references DNA, but the same principles have been used with other types of nucleic acids as well, leading to the occasional use of the alternative name nucleic acid nanotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • He calls building with synthetic materials according to nature's design principles biomimetic nanotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The NIA stands for: a framework of shared principles for the safe, sustainable and socially supportive development and use of nanotechnologies, a publicly and regulatory supportive environment for the continuing advancement and establishment of nanotechnology innovation. (wikipedia.org)
  • materials
  • Nanotechnology is an emergent area of science and engineering that - at its simplest - aims to study and manipulate the unique behaviour of materials at a scale of approximately 1-100 nanometres. (tsoshop.co.uk)
  • In this field, nucleic acids are used as non-biological engineering materials for nanotechnology rather than as the carriers of genetic information in living cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • This property is absent in other materials used in nanotechnology, including proteins, for which protein design is very difficult, and nanoparticles, which lack the capability for specific assembly on their own. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structural DNA nanotechnology, sometimes abbreviated as SDN, focuses on synthesizing and characterizing nucleic acid complexes and materials that assemble into a static, equilibrium end state. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most advanced nanotechnology projects related to energy are: storage, conversion, manufacturing improvements by reducing materials and process rates, energy saving (by better thermal insulation for example), and enhanced renewable energy sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media The health impacts of nanotechnology are the possible effects that the use of nanotechnological materials and devices will have on human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • formulation
  • After seeing what everyone is talking about, I thought I would throw out for consumption a unique product that employs nanotechnology in its formulation, and directly increases human performance without anything entering the body. (yahoo.com)
  • focuses
  • On the other hand, dynamic DNA nanotechnology focuses on complexes with useful non-equilibrium behavior such as the ability to reconfigure based on a chemical or physical stimulus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Robert Ludlum's 2005 novel The Lazarus Vendetta also focuses around nanotechnology, focusing mainly on its ability to cure cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • applications
  • Many different viruses have been studies for various applications in nanotechnology: for example, mammalian viruses are being developed as vectors for gene delivery, and bacteriophages and plant viruses have been used in drug delivery and imaging applications as well as in vaccines and immunotherapy intervention. (wikipedia.org)
  • The earliest evidence of the use and applications of nanotechnology can be traced back to carbon nanotubes, cementite nanowires found in the microstructure of wootz steel manufactured in ancient India from the time period of 600 BC and exported globally. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of nanotechnology in consumer products and industrial applications is growing rapidly, with the products listed in the PEN inventory showing just the tip of the iceberg" according to PEN Project Director David Rejeski . (wikipedia.org)
  • nanowires
  • The first method uses nanotechnology combined with tissue engineering, and gold nanowires are placed and woven into the damaged parts of the heart, essentially replacing the non-functioning or dead tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • relatively
  • In the category of medicine, nanotechnology is still relatively new and has not yet been widely adopted by the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nanotechnology of the heart is a lot less invasive than surgery because everything is occurring at a minuscule level in the body compared to relatively large tissues that are dealt with in surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • semiconductor
  • 6. Birth of Nanotechnology In contemporary times, manufacturing tolerances of parts have approached nanometric dimensions, especially in the manufacturing of semiconductor devices. (slideshare.net)
  • potential
  • Nanotechnology is gathering interest from those working in fields as diverse as healthcare, IT and energy generation and storage, with business and government investing heavily in a technology that promises huge potential for innovation. (tsoshop.co.uk)
  • Communication about the benefits, opportunities and potential problems associated with nanotechnologies. (tsoshop.co.uk)
  • field
  • These patches use nanotechnology to formulate amino acids, water, and oxygen inside a polymer shell to interact with the body's electromagnetic field. (yahoo.com)
  • The American physicist Richard Feynman lectured, "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom," at an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech on December 29, 1959, which is often held to have provided inspiration for the field of nanotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • As nanotechnology is an emerging field, there is great debate regarding to what extent nanotechnology will benefit or pose risks for human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further down the line, the speculative field of molecular nanotechnology believes that cell repair machines could revolutionize medicine and the medical field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, recently a new field arisen from the root of Nanotechnology is called Nanobiotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health
  • It is possible that nanotechnology could be the new breakthrough of medicine and may eventually be the solution and cure for many of the health problems that humans encounter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nanotechnology is being used in developing countries to help treat disease and prevent health issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Guidelines
  • Similar ideas are advocated in the Foresight Guidelines on Molecular Nanotechnology, and a map of the 137-dimensional replicator design space recently published by Freitas and Merkle provides numerous proposed methods by which replicators could, in principle, be safely controlled by good design. (wikipedia.org)