• leaf
  • The pseudoflowers are borne from basal leaf rosettes of the host mustard and mimic the yellow, early spring corollae of distantly related wildflowers (e.g. buttercups), not only in visible light but also in ultraviolet. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • A. agilissima needs a vertical surface to nest on and it typically feeds on flowers of plants in the mustard family for food. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pieris oleracea, or more commonly known as the mustard white, is a butterfly in the Pieridae family native to a large part of Canada and the northeastern United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • Pungency of mustard develops when cold water is added to the ground-up seed - an enzyme (myrosin) acts on a glycoside (sinigrin) to produce a sulphur compound. (pfaf.org)
  • formerly
  • Mustard plasters were formerly used in medicine for their counterirritant properties in treating chest colds and other ailments. (britannica.com)
  • commonly
  • citation needed] The original nitrogen mustard drug, mustine (HN2), is no longer commonly in use because of excessive toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • nutrients
  • It takes over the growing areas of trilliums, bloodroot, and other slow growing woodland and hedgerow plants, taking up sunlight, nutrients, water. (gardenfork.tv)
  • Upon germination of the spores, fungal hyphae penetrate the stem of the mustard plant and siphon off nutrients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recipe
  • This is a pretty piece of botanical clip art and would look lovely on the front of handmade greeting card or even on a recipe card where the recipe calls for mustard. (blogspot.com)
  • small
  • With their chewing mouthparts, beetles make small round pits in the cotyledons and leaves of young plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the plants grow, the remaining thin layers of tissue eventually dry up and fall away, leaving small "shot holes" in the foliage. (wikipedia.org)
  • At MU, Rédei researched the genetics and biology of Arabidopsis thaliana, a small mustard plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • pollen
  • A. agilissima is an oligolectic bee, meaning that they collect pollen from only a few flowering plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insects visiting the pseudoflowers transfer spermatia from one host plant to another, in the same way that pollinators transfer pollen between the true flowers of uninfected plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Origin
  • Domestication of Plants in the Old World: The Origin and Spread of Domesticated Plants in Southwest Asia, Europe, and the Mediterranean Basin (Fourth ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant chloroplasts are semiautonomous cell organelles of endosymbiotic origin that emerged from a cyanobacteria-like ancestor ( Lopez-Juez and Pyke, 2005 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • forage
  • Therefore, the only way A. agilissima can forage on this plant is when it close to an area that it can use as a nesting site. (wikipedia.org)
  • flowers
  • The plants reach their full height of 1.5 to 2 metres (5 to 6 1 / 2 feet) as their flowers fade and after numerous green seedpods appear on their branches. (britannica.com)
  • The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.The plant is self-fertile. (pfaf.org)
  • To accomplish this, the fungus sterilizes the host plant, preventing it from producing true flowers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bees feed on a sweet, sticky substance similar to nectar that the fungus forces the plant to produce on the imitation flowers. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Due to its use in previous studies, the nitrogen mustard known as "HN2" became the first chemotherapy drug mustine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some nitrogen mustards of opiates were also prepared, although these are not known to be antineoplastic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arabidopsis
  • As part of the DOE JGI's Community Science Program and Emerging Technologies Opportunity Program, the researchers who worked on the project sequenced and analyzed the genome of Boechera stricta, a relative of the model plant Arabidopsis. (hudsonalpha.org)
  • Name
  • This list is intended to help the reader find the appropriate article given the formal MeSH name or number for a plant or plant-related subject The MeSH number in the list is linked to its entry in the MeSH database. (wikipedia.org)
  • Green Wave" is a popular name for a type of mustard plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • As indicated by the common name, P. oleracea adults and larvae primarily feed on mustard plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • In folk medicine, it was used to soothe sore throats - indeed one name for it is singer's plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • branches
  • Living quarters are also often built against rock crevices, at the base of creosote or cactus plants, or in the lower branches of trees. (wikipedia.org)