• contraction
  • He also showed that the contraction and relaxation of small blood vessels were regulated by nerves. (tamu.edu)
  • A key finding was that heat is produced during contraction, which requires investment of chemical energy, but not during relaxation, which is passive. (wikipedia.org)
  • After publication he learned that German physiologist had already reported on heat and muscle contraction and he went to Germany to learn more about their work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also characteristic of the disease are trismus (a difficulty in opening the mouth resulting from spasms of the masseter muscles) and risus sardonicus (a grotesque grinning expression caused by the spasmodic contraction of the facial muscles). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This allows Na+ and Ca2+ ions to enter the cell and K+ ions to leave the cell, causing a depolarization of the end plate, resulting in muscle contraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, depolarizing agents, such as succinylcholine, are nicotinic receptor agonists which mimic Ach, block muscle contraction by depolarizing to such an extent that it desensitizes the receptor and it can no longer initiate an action potential and cause muscle contraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1935
  • The first breakthrough leading to successful medical use of curare came in 1935, when Harold King isolated its active principle, which he called tubocurarine. (encyclopedia.com)
  • widely
  • One of these compounds, succinylcholine, became a widely used and effective curare substitute that could be given in precise dosages with predictable effects. (encyclopedia.com)
  • muscular
  • Stage I is the loss of consciousness , with modest muscular relaxation, and is suitable for short, minor procedures. (britannica.com)
  • Primary tetanic manifestations include clonic and tonic spasms of the skeletal muscles, the twitching of the muscles adjacent to the wound, a sensation of general muscular constraint, and pain in the throat upon swallowing. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • abdominal
  • This is a Biomedical Research, prospective, randomized, controlled single-blind mono centric, phase IV comparison trial of the bilateral TAP block versus curare in muscle relaxation of the abdominal wall during laparoscopic digestive surgery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Muscle relaxation of the abdominal wall will be evaluated based on the amount of volume infused initially to create the pneumoperitoneum. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Over the next ten years, many doctors began using curare to relax their patients' muscles during abdominal surgery or during tracheal intubation (the inserting of a tube into the trachea to allow a patient to breathe). (encyclopedia.com)
  • motor neurons
  • The generation of the neuronal signals in motor neurons that cause muscle contractions are dependent on the balance of synaptic excitation and inhibition the motor neuron receives. (wikipedia.org)
  • malignant hyperthermia
  • This is all the more important in temperate and tropical countries where room temperatures can go as high as 30 °C. Side effects include malignant hyperthermia, muscle pains, acute rhabdomyolysis with high blood levels of potassium, transient ocular hypertension, constipation and changes in cardiac rhythm, including slow heart rate, and cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malignant hyperthermia (MH) from suxamethonium administration can result in a drastic and uncontrolled increase in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drug
  • A patient who receives an injection (shot) of this drug into a muscle quickly begins to feel dizzy and warm. (encyclopedia.com)
  • mechanical
  • He shared the 1922 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his elucidation of the production of heat and mechanical work in muscles . (wikipedia.org)
  • Paralleling the work of German Otto Fritz Meyerhof , Hill elucidated the processes whereby mechanical work is produced in muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • He succeeded in 1947 with the medicine gallamine, and then went on to make more than 400 compounds that had the same effects as curare. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Clinical effects (muscle activity lower than 25% of physiological) last for about 100 minutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common side effects include low blood pressure, increased saliva production, muscle pain, and rash. (wikipedia.org)
  • acts
  • The tetanus toxin, one of the most potent poisons known, acts on the motor nerves and causes muscle spasm at the site of infection and in other areas of the body. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • available
  • A temperature of 95 ° F (35 ° C) is only the beginning of mild hypothermia and shivering can continue for hours, depending on the muscle and fat supplies available. (thefreedictionary.com)