• postpartum
  • MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes and a previous bout of depression can increase a first-time mother's risk of postpartum depression, a new study suggests. (wect.com)
  • The analysis of data from more than 700,000 women in Sweden showed that gestational diabetes (developing diabetes during pregnancy) alone raised the risk for postpartum depression. (wect.com)
  • Most practitioners think of these as two isolated and very different conditions, but we now understand gestational diabetes and postpartum depression should be considered together," said study lead author Michael Silverman. (wect.com)
  • While having diabetes increases [postpartum depression] risk for all women, for those women who have had a past depressive episode, having diabetes during pregnancy makes it 70 percent more likely that they will develop [postpartum depression]," Silverman said in a school news release. (wect.com)
  • The researchers said they also identified other risk factors for postpartum depression. (wect.com)
  • The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on postpartum depression . (wect.com)
  • IMAGE: Tufts University neuroscientists Jamie Maguire (left) and Laverne Mel√≥n have generated a novel preclinical model of postpartum depression and demonstrated involvement of the neuroendocrine system that mediates physiological response to. (sciencecodex.com)
  • BOSTON (Dec. 26, 2017)--Postpartum depression strikes nearly one in five new mothers, who may experience anxiety, severe fatigue, inability to bond with their children and suicidal thoughts. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Now neuroscientists at Tufts University School of Medicine have generated a novel preclinical model of postpartum depression and demonstrated involvement of the neuroendocrine system that mediates physiological response to stress, called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is normally suppressed during and after pregnancy. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The findings in mice provide the first empirical evidence that disruption of this system engenders behaviors that mimic postpartum depression in humans. (sciencecodex.com)
  • This study, to be published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology and now available online, provides a much-needed research model for further investigation into the causes of and treatment for postpartum depression, which has largely relied on correlational studies in humans because of the scarcity of animal models. (sciencecodex.com)
  • During and after pregnancy such activation is normally blunted - helping to insulate developing offspring from stress - and dysregulation of the HPA axis has been suggested as playing a role in the physiology of postpartum depression. (sciencecodex.com)
  • However, clinical data on stress hormones in women with postpartum depression has been inconsistent. (sciencecodex.com)
  • To date, research has not directly demonstrated a role for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) -- the main driver of the stress response, which is primarily secreted by a cluster of neurons in the hypothalamus called the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) -- or for inappropriate activation of the HPA axis in postpartum depression. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Some clinical studies show a relationship between CRH, HPA axis function and postpartum depression, but others fail to replicate these findings. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Using a mouse model that we developed, our new study provides the first empirical evidence supporting the clinical observations of HPA axis dysfunction in patients with postpartum depression and shows for the first time that dysregulation of the HPA axis and a specific protein in the brain, KCC2, can be enough to induce postpartum depression-like behaviors and deficits in maternal care," she continued. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of postnatal depression screening by comparing the mental health outcome (at 6 months postpartum ) of mothers under the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) screening programme versus usual clinical practice (usual practice), using randomized controlled trial design. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • women
  • Among women with a history of depression, diabetes before pregnancy and giving birth prematurely at 32 to 36 weeks (full-term delivery is 39 to 40 weeks) increased the risk, the researchers said. (wect.com)
  • Also, among women with no history of depression, giving birth at a young age, having an instrument-assisted or cesarean delivery, and giving birth before 32 weeks increased the risk. (wect.com)