• discipline
  • Researchers Frank Pega and Ichiro Kawachi from Harvard University have suggested that this may lead to the new discipline of Political Epidemiology, which is more policy-applied in that it identifies effective and cost-effecfive social interventions for government action to improve health equity. (wikipedia.org)
  • paradigm
  • However, this type of analysis needs a consideration of disease heterogeneity (eg, KRAS mutation present vs. absent), which necessitates a paradigm shift from conventional epidemiology, which is based on the premise that individuals with a given disease (by name) are homogeneous and can be lumped together to analyze the associations with exposures. (dana-farber.org)
  • colorectal
  • We have been examining drug use (aspirin, other NSAIDs, statin, etc.) in relation to incidence and consequence of colorectal cancer subtypes defined by tumor molecular and immune characteristics. (dana-farber.org)
  • The latter two relate to MPE research on use of statin (HMA-CoA reductase inhibitor to lower blood cholesterol level) and colorectal carcinoma risk and survival according to tumor molecular subtypes. (dana-farber.org)
  • populations
  • Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of diseases and other health states in populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epidemiology is the study and analysis of the distribution[disambiguation needed] and determinants of health and disease conditions in defined populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the term is widely used in studies of zoological populations (veterinary epidemiology), although the term "epizoology" is available, and it has also been applied to studies of plant populations (botanical or plant disease epidemiology). (wikipedia.org)
  • Precision
  • Precision medicine often involves the application of panomic analysis and systems biology to analyze the cause of an individual patient's disease at the molecular level and then to utilize targeted treatments (possibly in combination) to address that individual patient's disease process. (wikipedia.org)
  • analyze
  • Thus, gel electrophoresis techniques like pulsed-field gel electrophoresis can be used in molecular epidemiology to comparatively analyze patterns of bacterial chromosomal fragments and to elucidate the genomic content of bacterial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • As the application of dynamical systems theory to molecular biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their model described a cellular function emerging from the interaction between two different molecular components, a potassium and a sodium channel, and can therefore be seen as the beginning of computational systems biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • DISCIPLINES
  • Social epidemiology draws on methodologies and theoretical frameworks from many disciplines, and research overlaps with several social science fields, most notably economics, medical anthropology, medical sociology, health psychology and medical geography, as well as many domains of epidemiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • represents
  • While most molecular epidemiology studies are using conventional disease designation system for an outcome (with the use of exposures at the molecular level), compelling evidence indicates that disease evolution represents inherently heterogeneous process differing from person to person. (wikipedia.org)
  • determinants
  • Although health research is often organized by disease categories or organ systems, theoretical development in social epidemiology is typically organized around factors that influence health (i.e., health determinants rather than health outcomes). (wikipedia.org)
  • exposome
  • Each patient has a unique disease process ("the unique disease principle"), considering the uniqueness of the exposome and its unique influence on molecular pathologic process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Per Wild even incomplete versions of the exposome could be useful to epidemiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conceptually, each individual has a unique disease process different from any other individual ("the unique disease principle"), considering uniqueness of the exposome and its unique influence on molecular pathologic process in each individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Techniques are numerous but include quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), multiplex PCR, DNA microarray, in situ hybridization, DNA sequencing, antibody based immunofluorescence tissue assays, molecular profiling of pathogens, and analysis of bacterial genes for antimicrobial resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • The International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE) Meeting Series has been open to research community around the world, its second and third meetings were held in Boston, in December 2014 and May 2016, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • The state of the art of aging and nutrigenomics research and the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of bioactive nutrients on the main aging-related disorders are reviewed herein. (mdpi.com)
  • The HELIX project at the Barcelona-based Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology will attempt[when? (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of "molecular epidemiology" for this type of research masked the presence of these challenges, and hindered the development of methods and guidelines. (wikipedia.org)
  • science
  • The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates, Semmelweis and John Snow. (wikipedia.org)
  • He received a Master of Science in Epidemiology degree from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in 2010, and then subsequently obtained a secondary faculty appointment (Associate Professor) in 2012, promoted to Professor at that school in 2015. (wikipedia.org)