• ribosomes
  • A group of researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing has discovered that a protein called MTERF4 combines with another protein called NSUN4 to form a complex that controls the formation and function of the mitochondrial ribosomes. (redorbit.com)
  • dysfunction
  • Nerve cells in the brain and muscles appear to be particularly damaged when mitochondrial dysfunction occurs because nerve cells and muscles require a great amount of energy. (smartdraw.com)
  • They may also be the result of acquired mitochondrial dysfunction due to adverse effects of drugs, infections, or other environmental causes (see MeSH). (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitohondrial optic neuropathies are a heterogenous group of disorders that present with visual disturbances resultant from mitochondrial dysfunction within the anatomy of the Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGC), optic nerve, optic chiasm, and optic tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease
  • What is Mitochondrial Disease? (umdf.org)
  • Mitochondrial Disease Coummunity Registry - Patients, Family Members and Caregivers: Enroll now in the Mitochondrial Disease Community Registry to help advance the development of treatments and cures. (umdf.org)
  • Mitochondrial disease is difficult to diagnose, because it affects each individual differently. (umdf.org)
  • If three or more organ systems are involved, mitochondrial disease should be suspected. (umdf.org)
  • Although mitochondrial disease primarily affects children, adult onset is becoming more common. (umdf.org)
  • This over-simplification is a mistake which has slowed our progress toward understanding the biology underlying mitochondrial disease. (umdf.org)
  • The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. (ahajournals.org)
  • Conclusions- Our results do not support an association of mitochondrial haplogroups with risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other causes, mortality, or longevity in a large general population of European descent. (ahajournals.org)
  • 8 Recently, numerous reports have suggested a role for mitochondrial haplogroups, defined by the presence or absence of common polymorphisms, in the pathogenesis of ischemic cardiovascular disease and other diseases, as well as in longevity. (ahajournals.org)
  • The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust, offers hope of being able to predict a child's risk of developing a mitochondrial disease which can cause muscle weakness, diabetes, strokes, heart failure and epilepsy. (eurekalert.org)
  • This text covers the basic principles of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiovascular medicine, with particular emphasis on their functional roles in physiology and disease. (springer.com)
  • tRNA
  • Protein synthesis makes use of mitochondrial DNA, RNA, and tRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • 30 Platyhelminth mitochondrial DNA: evidence for early evolutionary origin of a tRNA(serAGN) that contains a dihydrouridine arm replacement loop, and of serine-specifying AGA and AGG codons Garey, J.R. and D.R. Wolstenholme, 1989. (wikipedia.org)
  • genomes
  • The complex nature of mitochondrial gene expression that relies on two different genomes calls for a multidisciplinary approach in which different teams of researchers join forces. (eurekalert.org)
  • By enabling genetic complementation, fusion of the mitochondria allows for two mitochondrial genomes with different defects within the same organelle to individually encode what the other lacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms
  • Although mitochondrial diseases vary greatly in presentation from person to person, several major clinical categories of these conditions have been defined, based on the most common phenotypic features, symptoms, and signs associated with the particular mutations that tend to cause them. (wikipedia.org)
  • human genetics
  • In human genetics, the Mitochondrial Eve (also mt-Eve, mt-MRCA) is the matrilineal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of all currently living humans, i.e., the most recent woman from whom all living humans descend in an unbroken line purely through their mothers, and through the mothers of those mothers, back until all lines converge on one woman. (wikipedia.org)
  • biogenesis
  • Mitochondrial biogenesis is the process by which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass and copy number to increase the production of ATP as a response to greater energy expenditure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by numerous different signals during times of cellular stress or in response to environmental stimuli, such as aerobic exercise. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, achieving a balance between these mechanisms allow a cell to have the proper organization of its mitochondrial network during biogenesis and may have an important role in muscle adaptation to physiological stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathways
  • The key aim of the REMIX network is to combine the skills of European research groups to strategically train the next generation of scientists in a program that will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms and pathways that regulate mitochondrial gene expression. (eurekalert.org)
  • citation needed] Again, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nutritional optic neuropathies is common to all mitochondrial optic neuropathies: it affects biochemical pathways involved in cell energetic production, correction of oxidative stress and quenching of free radicals. (wikipedia.org)