• refers
  • Overflow metabolism refers to the seemingly wasteful strategy in which cells incompletely oxidize their growth substrate (e.g. glucose) instead of using the more energetically-efficient respiratory pathway, even in the presence of oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • heterotrophic
  • Biochemically, prokaryotic heterotrophic metabolism is much more versatile than that of eukaryotic organisms, although many prokaryotes share the most basic metabolic models with eukaryotes, e. g. using glycolysis (also called EMP pathway) for sugar metabolism and the citric acid cycle to degrade acetate, producing energy in the form of ATP and reducing power in the form of NADH or quinols. (wikipedia.org)
  • energy
  • Your body gets the energy it needs from food through a process called metabolism. (kidshealth.org)
  • Metabolism converts the fuel in the food we eat into the energy needed to power everything we do, from moving to thinking to growing. (kidshealth.org)
  • Anabolism (pronounced: uh-NAB-uh-lih-zem), or constructive metabolism , is all about building and storing: It supports the growth of new cells, the maintenance of body tissues, and the storage of energy for use in the future. (kidshealth.org)
  • Thus, the book describes in detail the energy metabolism of the various groups of bacteria. (springer.com)
  • Enzymes are crucial to metabolism because they allow organisms to drive desirable reactions that require energy that will not occur by themselves, by coupling them to spontaneous reactions that release energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Urban metabolism is a model to facilitate the description and analysis of the flows of the materials and energy within cities, such as undertaken in a material flow analysis of a city. (wikipedia.org)
  • C. Kennedy and fellow researchers have produced a clear definition in the 2007 paper The Changing Metabolism of Cities claiming that urban metabolism is "the sum total of the technical and socio-economic process that occur in cities, resulting in growth, production of energy and elimination of waste. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxidative
  • Studies on flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway during D-xylose metabolism have revealed that limiting the rate of this step may be beneficial to the efficiency of fermentation to ethanol. (wikipedia.org)
  • NADPH
  • Since the pentose phosphate pathway produces additional NADPH during metabolism, limiting this step will help to correct the already evident imbalance between NAD(P)H and NAD+ cofactors and reduce xylitol byproduct formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fructose
  • Although humans consume a variety of carbohydrates, digestion breaks down complex carbohydrates into a few simple monomers for metabolism: glucose, fructose, and galactose. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Marx used the metaphor of metabolism to refer to the actual metabolic interactions that take place through humans' exertion of physical labour to cultivate the Earth for sustenance and shelter (M. Fischer-Kowalski, 1998). (wikipedia.org)
  • urban
  • Like Team 10's "human association" concepts Metabolism too was exploring new concepts in urban design. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the beginning, researchers have tweaked and altered the parameters of the urban metabolism model. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the growing concern of climate change and atmospheric degradation, the use of the urban metabolism model has become a key element in determining and maintaining levels of sustainability and health in cities around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Urban metabolism provides a unified or holistic viewpoint to encompass all of the activities of a city in a single model. (wikipedia.org)
  • With deep roots in sociology, Karl Marx and fellow researcher Friedrich Engels may have been the first to raise concerns around issues which we would now call urban metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • This acknowledgement of altering the biophysical landscape is the first stepping stone for the creation of urban metabolism within social geography. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marx advocated that urban metabolism becomes a power in itself (like capitalism), and will control society unless society is able to control it. (wikipedia.org)
  • It wasn't until 1965 when Abel Wolman fully developed and used the term urban metabolism in his work, "The Metabolism of Cities" which he developed in response to deteriorating air and water qualities in American cities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Working off of Wolman's pioneering work in the 60's, environmentalist Herbert Girardet (1996) began to see and document his findings in the connection between urban metabolism and sustainable cities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Girardet laid the foundation for the industrial ecology approach to urban metabolism in which it is seen as the "conversion of nature into society. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aside from being a great advocate and populariser for urban metabolism, Girardet significantly coined and drew the difference between a 'circular' and 'linear' metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the other hand, a 'linear' metabolism which is characterized as an urban world process has a clear resource in-put and waste out-put. (wikipedia.org)
  • influences
  • Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not surprising that many people think of it in its simplest sense: as something that influences how easily our bodies gain or lose weight. (kidshealth.org)
  • reaction
  • Later, in reaction against industrialization and coal use, Sir Patrick Geddes, a Scottish biologist, undertook an ecological critique of urbanization in 1885, making him the first scientist to attempt an empirical description of societal metabolism on a macroeconomic scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • biological
  • Metabolism (新陳代謝, shinchintaisha) was a post-war Japanese architectural movement that fused ideas about architectural megastructures with those of organic biological growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • stream
  • 2008). Part of understanding how disturbance will impact trophic dynamics lies in understanding disturbance impacts to stream metabolism (Holtgrieve et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemical
  • Thyroxine (pronounced: thigh-ROK-seen), a hormone produced and released by the thyroid (pronounced: THIGH-royd) gland, plays a key role in determining how fast or slow the chemical reactions of metabolism proceed in a person's body. (kidshealth.org)
  • Metabolism (from Greek: μεταβολή metabolē, "change") is the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Deterioration of mitochondria and metabolism is a common component of numerous diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration as well as the aging process. (umassmed.edu)
  • Treatments
  • Through studying these changes, it is possible to better understand the mechanisms of cell growth and where possible develop treatments to counter the effects of enhanced metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • principles
  • Some smaller, individual buildings that employed the principles of Metabolism were built and these included Tange's Yamanashi Press and Broadcaster Centre and Kurokawa's Nakagin Capsule Tower. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • Perlstein:we found these depression patients, zoloft slowing metabolism that to us were brutal with the vite that the pharmacies were usually soaking up the zoloft, and by doing possibly, it changed their cells. (duvalia.com)
  • These networks can then themselves be used to study metabolism within cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research has shown that cells undergoing rapid growth have shown changes in their metabolism. (wikipedia.org)