• pathway
  • The emerging theory is stated simplistically as follows: High ROS from the mitochondria signals the insulin pathway that the cell is producing lots of energy, and already has enough glucose. (juvenon.com)
  • In biochemistry, a metabolon is a temporary structural-functional complex formed between sequential enzymes of a metabolic pathway, held together both by non-covalent interactions and by structural elements of the cell, such as integral membrane proteins and proteins of the cytoskeleton. (wikipedia.org)
  • The formation of metabolons allows the intermediate product from one enzyme to be passed (channelling) directly into the active site of the next consecutive enzyme of the metabolic pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the primary regulators of a crucial step in the central metabolic pathway, the pyruvate dehydrogenase family is tightly regulated itself by a myriad of factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • nutrient
  • While metabolic shifts are triggered by growth factor signaling and nutrient availability in all mammalian cells, polarizing signals have a critical and prominent role during macrophage activation. (frontiersin.org)
  • In 2014, the Sabri Ülker Center for Nutrient, Genetic, and Metabolic Research at HSPH was established by the Ülker family to honor their late father Sabri Ülker and to support the research in the laboratory of Hotamisligil. (wikipedia.org)
  • lifespan
  • This conclusion was especially noteworthy because the inversion of its scaling exponent, between 0.2 and 0.33, was the scaling for lifespan and metabolic rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two sources inspired Harman: 1) the rate of living theory, which holds that lifespan is an inverse function of metabolic rate which in turn is proportional to oxygen consumption, and 2) Rebbeca Gershman's observation that hyperbaric oxygen toxicity and radiation toxicity could be explained by the same underlying phenomenon: oxygen free radicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulate
  • Circadian rhythms are important in all organisms because they regulate biological functions such as food intake, temperature, metabolic rate and sleep," van der Linden said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • fatty
  • For example, this signal tells mitochondria to respond to over-nutrition and low ATP demand by slowing the TCA cycle and b-oxidation of fatty acids, while simultaneously increasing the breakdown of carbohydrates for fat storage. (juvenon.com)
  • control
  • Secondary control of the JH titre found in the haemolymph of the developing insect is metabolic inactivation of JH by JH-specific esterase and juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Function
  • Healthy mitochondrial function is fundamental to normal metabolic function. (juvenon.com)
  • Mutation of this region, or depletion of available Fe/S clusters, renders the protein unable to function, and loss of cell viability, making RLI the only known essential cytoplasmic protein dependent on Fe/S cluster biosynthesis in the mitochondria. (wikipedia.org)
  • rate
  • Colloquially called the "mouse-to-elephant" curve, Kleiber's conclusion was that basal metabolic rate could accurately be predicted by taking 3/4 the power of body weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Support for this theory has been bolstered by studies linking a lower basal metabolic rate (evident with a lowered heartbeat) to increased life expectancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, a number of species with high metabolic rate, like bats and birds, are long-lived. (wikipedia.org)
  • evidence
  • Emerging evidence from many areas of science is accumulating to suggest that mitochondria play much more active roles in communication with other organelles, determining cell and organismal behavior. (keystonesymposia.org)
  • functions
  • The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. (wur.nl)
  • certain
  • also referred to as PTP, mTP or MTP) is a protein that is formed in the inner membrane of the mitochondria under certain pathological conditions such as traumatic brain injury and stroke. (wikipedia.org)