• cases
  • Five to ten percent of cases can be fatal, although the average mortality rate in developing nations is seventeen percent, mostly due to lack of access to vaccination as well as lack of access to medical care needed to combat the meningitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the widespread use of the Hib vaccine, Haemophilus meningitis accounted for 40%-60% of all meningitis cases in children under the age of fifteen, and 90% of all meningitis cases in children under the age of five. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less-developed countries as well as countries with medical infrastructure that has been damaged in any way, such as from warfare, do not have such widespread access to the vaccine and thus experience higher rates of meningitis cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Herd immunity, or the protection that unvaccinated individuals experience when the majority of others in their proximity are vaccinated, does help in the reduction of meningitis cases, but it does not guarantee protection from the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • The risk of developing Haemophilus meningitis is most directly related to an individual's vaccination history, as well as the vaccination history of the general public. (wikipedia.org)
  • sick
  • Contact with an infected person may increase your chance of becoming infected with the virus that made them sick, but your chance of developing meningitis as a complication of the illness is small. (virginia.gov)
  • A child in the presence of family members sick with Haemophilus meningitis or carrying the bacteria is 585 times more likely to catch Haemophilus meningitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • If meningitis is suspected, doctors will take samples of blood and/or fluid near the spinal cord and send them to the laboratory for testing. (virginia.gov)