• Sonchus
  • Sonchus arvensis, the perennial sow thistle, is considered the most economically detrimental, as it can crowd commercial crops, is a heavy consumer of nitrogen in soils, may deplete soil water of land left to fallow, and can regrow and sprout additional plants from its creeping roots. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tropicos.org: photo of herbarium specimen at Missouri Botanical Garden Tropicos.org: line drawing from Flora of Panama Nature Manitoba: Annual Sow-thistle (Sonchus oleraceus) - photos, drawings, & text from Wild Plants of Winnipeg. (wikipedia.org)
  • Holy Thistle
  • This is why the plant's Latin name is marianum and why it is sometimes called Our Lady's Thistle, although the Holy Thistle is also called by the same name, which tends to confuse the issue. (blogspot.com)
  • Angelica Aniseed Apricot Arnica Artichoke Asafoetida Boneset Cassia Celery Cinnamon Cowslip Dandelion Elecampane Euphorbia Feverfew Fucus Gravel root Guaiacum Holy Thistle Hops Hydrangea Hydrocotyle Juniper Lady's slipper Meadowsweet Milk thistle Motherwort Parsley Pilewort Plantain Pulsatilla Rosemary Tansy Vitex agnus-castus Wild carrot Yarrow Alternative medicine Herbalism List of branches of alternative medicine List of plants used in herbalism List of poisonous plants Talalay, P. (wikipedia.org)
  • milky
  • Sow thistles exude a milky latex when any part of the plant is cut or damaged, and it is from this fact that the plants obtained the common name, "sow thistle", as they were fed to lactating sows in the belief that milk production would increase. (wikipedia.org)
  • oleraceus
  • Most livestock will readily devour sow thistle in preference to grass, and this lettuce-relative is edible and nutritious to humans-in fact this is the meaning of the second part of the Latin name of the common sow thistle, oleraceus. (wikipedia.org)
  • seeds
  • In many areas sow thistles are considered noxious weeds, as they grow quickly in a wide range of conditions and their wind-borne seeds allow them to spread rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • After a few weeks or months of breastfeeding, changes that are commonly mistaken for signs of low milk supply include breasts feeling softer (this is normal after 1-3 months), more frequent demands by the infant to feed, feeds becoming shorter over time, baby colic, the perception that the baby is more satisfied after being fed infant formula, and a slowdown in growth after three months. (wikipedia.org)
  • tribe
  • The term thistle is sometimes taken to mean exactly those plants in the tribe Cardueae (synonym: Cynareae), especially the genera Carduus, Cirsium, and Onopordum. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, plants outside this tribe are sometimes called thistles, and if this is done thistles would form a polyphyletic group. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • In breastfeeding women, low milk supply, also known as lactation insufficiency, insufficient milk syndrome, agalactia, agalactorrhea, hypogalactia or hypogalactorrhea, is the production of breast milk in daily volumes that do not fully meet the nutritional needs of her infant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary causes of low milk supply include: insufficient glandular tissue, also known as primary lactation failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many medications are known to significantly suppress milk production, including pseudoephedrine, diuretics, and contraceptives that contain estrogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • practices
  • The main method for increasing milk supply is improved breastfeeding practices and/or expressing milk through pumping or hand expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • although
  • Milk thistles are a common weed in the British Isles, although they are probably not native as they would appear to come from the Mediterranean region. (blogspot.com)
  • powder
  • Anticaking agents Anticaking agents keep powders such as milk powder from caking or sticking. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • Mature sow thistle stems can range from 30 cm to 2 m (1 to 6 feet) tall, depending upon species and growing conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • High levels of prolactin are necessary for lactation, however there is no direct correlation between baseline levels of prolactin and quantity of milk production. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, sow thistles are easily uprooted by hand, and their soft stems present little resistance to slashing or mowing. (wikipedia.org)
  • contains
  • One aspect of supply regulation that has been identified is that breast milk contains a peptide called feedback inhibitor of lactation (FIL). (wikipedia.org)
  • mothers
  • John Evelyn (1620-1706) believed, as did the Physicians of Myddfai, from whom he may have got his information, that milk thistle promoted the milk supply of breast-feeding mothers. (blogspot.com)
  • Several common misconceptions often lead mothers to believe they have insufficient milk when they are in fact producing enough. (wikipedia.org)
  • less
  • A mother is considered to have low milk supply if she produces less breast milk than her infant requires. (wikipedia.org)
  • native
  • Control measures include Trichosirocalus weevils, but a problem with this approach, at least in North America, is that the introduced weevils may affect native thistles at least as much as the desired targets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Products
  • Other thistles that nominally are weeds are important honey plants, both as bee fodder in general, and as sources of luxury monofloral honey products. (wikipedia.org)
  • least
  • Plants included here are those that have been or are being used medicinally, in at least one such medicinal tradition. (wikipedia.org)
  • production
  • retained placenta Sheehan's syndrome prior breast surgery (especially breast reduction) prior nipple piercing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) hypothyroidism hypoprolactinemia theca lutein cysts hypertension pregnancy Smoking more than 15 cigarettes per day is associated with reduced milk production. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Breastfeeding management issues that can interfere with regular milk drainage from the breast include poor latch, unnecessary use of supplemental formula, timed or scheduled feedings (as opposed to on-demand feedings), and overuse of pacifiers. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • Low milk supply is usually caused by allowing milk to remain in the breasts for long periods of time, or insufficiently draining the breasts during feeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is used only after a mother's milk "comes in", which usually occurs around 30-40 hours after delivery of a full-term infant. (wikipedia.org)
  • supply
  • Breast milk supply augments in response to the baby's demand for milk, and decreases when milk is allowed to remain in the breasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actual low milk supply is likely if the baby is latching and swallowing well at the breast, is nevertheless not growing well or is showing signs of dehydration or malnutrition, and does not have a medical condition that would explain the lack of growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Low milk supply can be either primary (caused by medical conditions or anatomical issues in the mother), secondary (caused by not thoroughly and regularly removing milk from the breasts) or both. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical conditions in the infant that result in weak or unco-ordinated sucking can cause low milk supply by inhibiting the transfer of milk to the baby. (wikipedia.org)
  • The physiological mechanisms that regulate breast milk supply are poorly understood. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a mother's milk comes in, a reduction in supply is inevitable unless milk is removed regularly and thoroughly from the breasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surgery or injury to the breast can decrease supply by disrupting milk ducts that carry milk from the alveoli, where milk is produced, to the nipple. (wikipedia.org)
  • A woman's belief that her milk supply is insufficient is one of the most common reasons for discontinuing breastfeeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Thistle flowers are favourite nectar sources of the pearl-bordered fritillary, small pearl-bordered fritillary, high brown fritillary, and dark green fritillary butterflies. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the symbol of the Order of the Thistle, a high chivalric order of Scotland. (wikipedia.org)