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  • occur
  • Although metastases from both the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses may occur, and distant metastases are found in 20% to 40% of patients who do not respond to treatment, locoregional recurrence accounts for the majority of cancer deaths since most patients die of direct extension into vital areas of the skull or of rapidly recurring local disease. (peacehealth.org)
  • ostium
  • The results of experimental studies suggest that the natural ventilation-rate of a sinus with a single sinus ostium (opening), is extremely slow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blocked ostium: If the ostium of the sinus is blocked, the fluid doesn't return through it. (wikipedia.org)
  • endoscopic sinus
  • To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of endoscopic sinus surgery for sinonasal malignancy. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • He is an expert in endoscopic sinus and laryngeal/voice surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1994, on a WHO fellowship, he worked with David W. Kennedy in the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center and learned functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). (wikipedia.org)
  • If more than three successive puncture shows returning fluid to be persistently purulent, the patient may require functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and occasionally may need Caldwell-Luc operation. (wikipedia.org)
  • mucus
  • These cilia beats constantly to move mucus produced in sinuses into the respiratory tract and out through the nasal cavity. (epainassist.com)
  • On radiographs, there is opacification (or cloudiness) of the usually translucent sinus due to retained mucus. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • A second portal could be used to insert an instrument into the sinus to obtain specimens, debride tissue, and lavage the sinus cavity. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • In spiral computed tomography (CT) scan, soft tissue mass with the erosion of maxillary sinus wall on the right side of the alveolar ridge was evident. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Computed tomography scan revealed an expansile soft tissue mass in the right maxillary sinus with erosion of all of its walls. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • A sinus is a sac or cavity in any organ or tissue, or an abnormal cavity or passage caused by the destruction of tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • recurrent
  • The following are treatment options for recurrent maxillary sinus cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • External beam radiation therapy may be offered for recurrent maxillary sinus cancer if you had surgery to treat the original tumour. (cancer.ca)
  • You may be offered chemotherapy for recurrent maxillary sinus cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • Targeted therapy is sometimes used to treat recurrent maxillary sinus cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • Cetuximab (Erbitux) is the targeted therapy drug most often used for recurrent maxillary sinus cancer. (cancer.ca)
  • Consider imaging studies in recurrent or unclear cases: some sinus involvement is frequent early in the course of uncomplicated viral URI Treatment comprises symptomatic support usually via analgesics for headache, sore throat and muscle aches. (wikipedia.org)
  • venous
  • Thus composition of gas content in the maxillary sinus is similar to venous blood, with high carbon dioxide and lower oxygen levels compared to breathing air. (wikipedia.org)
  • trigeminal
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The infraorbital nerve arises from the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve and normally traverses the orbital floor in the infraorbital canal. (semanticscholar.org)
  • verification needed] The confusion occurs in part because migraine involves activation of the trigeminal nerves, which innervate both the sinus region and the meninges surrounding the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are innervated by the trigeminal nerve (CN Va). The paranasal air sinuses are lined with respiratory epithelium (ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium). (wikipedia.org)
  • It also sends postganglionic parasympathetic fibers to the lacrimal nerve (a branch of the Ophthalmic nerve, also part of the trigeminal nerve) via the zygomatic nerve, a branch of the maxillary nerve (from the trigeminal nerve), which then arrives at the lacrimal gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • drains
  • Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is the formation of a blood clot within the cavernous sinus, a cavity at the base of the brain which drains deoxygenated blood from the brain back to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • Nishioka GJ, Cook PR, McKinsey JP, Rodriguez FJ (1996) Paranasal sinus computed tomography scan findings in patients with cystic fibrosis. (springer.com)
  • Findings may include deformity of the internal carotid artery within the cavernous sinus, and an obvious signal hyperintensity within thrombosed vascular sinuses on all pulse sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • cysts
  • Lateral and dorsoventral radiographs of the skull may reveal fluid lines, sinus cysts, solid masses, or lytic/proliferative changes associated with dental disease and neoplasia. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • branches of the maxillary nerve
  • The pterygopalatine ganglion (of Meckel), the largest of the parasympathetic ganglia associated with the branches of the maxillary nerve, is deeply placed in the pterygopalatine fossa, close to the sphenopalatine foramen. (wikipedia.org)
  • cystic fibrosis
  • Eggesbo HB, Sovik S, Dolvik S, Eiklid K, Kolmannskog F (2001) CT characterisation of developmental variations of the paranasal sinuses in cystic fibrosis. (springer.com)
  • Eggesbo HB, Eken T, Eiklid K, Kolmannskog F (1999) Hypoplasia of the sphenoid sinus as a diagnostic tool in cystic fibrosis. (springer.com)
  • Woodworth BA, Ahn C, Flume PA, Schlosser RJ (2007) The delta F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis and impact on sinus development. (springer.com)
  • examination
  • Histopathological examination of the excised tumor with immunohistochemical studies (C-kit, Vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, p53, p63, and ki67 positive reaction) confirmed grade 2 ACC in the maxillary sinus. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Materials and methods: This study included radiographic examination of 104 maxillary sinuses of 52 individuals (26 females, 50% and 26 males, 50%) whose panoramic radiographs and CBCT images were obtained for several dental causes which were examined by the consensus of four dentomaxillofacial radiologists. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Stand near the person during an extraoral examination to visually inspect and bilaterally palpate the maxillary sinuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • scan
  • Once you see the specialist he will treat you with antibiotics and should get a ct scan of your sinuses. (healthtap.com)
  • A MRI using flow parameters and an MR venogram are more sensitive than a CT scan, and are the imaging studies of choice to diagnose cavernous sinus thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • bones
  • Sinuses are spaces in our bones that are filled with air. (forumotion.com)
  • The sinuses are actually four pairs of hollow spaces in the bones of the face. (sindamag.com)
  • The sinuses are named for the facial bones in which they are located. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biological role of the sinuses is debated, but a number of possible functions have been proposed:[citation needed] Decreasing the relative weight of the front of the skull, and especially the bones of the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bones occupied by sinuses are quite variable in these other species. (wikipedia.org)
  • trigeminal nerve
  • They are innervated by the trigeminal nerve (CN Va). The paranasal air sinuses are lined with respiratory epithelium (ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium). (wikipedia.org)
  • It also sends postganglionic parasympathetic fibers to the lacrimal nerve (a branch of the Ophthalmic nerve, also part of the trigeminal nerve) via the zygomatic nerve, a branch of the maxillary nerve (from the trigeminal nerve), which then arrives at the lacrimal gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • Tumors originating or involving the inferior aspect of the maxillary sinus may be treated by a partial maxillectomy in which only the inferior aspect of the sinus is removed, thus preserving the malar complex, inferior orbital rim, and orbital floor. (medscape.com)
  • congestion
  • Based on our own research and experiences with clients and health practitioners over the years, we've observed that sinus congestion is dramatically improved or completely relieved with the application of magnetic therapy. (sindamag.com)
  • malignancies
  • Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for most maxillary sinus lesions, with the exception of malignancies that are highly responsive to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, such as lymphoreticular malignancies (eg, lymphoma ) and pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas , or when dealing with advanced disease when no gain in life expectancy or quality of life is expected. (medscape.com)
  • Malignancies of the paranasal sinuses comprise approximately 0.2% of all malignancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 80% of these malignancies arise in the maxillary sinus. (wikipedia.org)
  • invasive
  • Plain Radiological X-rays (Water's view) of sinuses is most specific non- invasive method of diagnosing Antral pathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathology
  • The pathology of sinus barotrauma is directly related to Boyle's law, which states that the volume of a gas is inversely proportional to the pressure on it, when temperature is constant (P1 × V1 = P2 × V2). (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve
  • The pterygopalatine ganglion (of Meckel), the largest of the parasympathetic ganglia associated with the branches of the maxillary nerve, is deeply placed in the pterygopalatine fossa, close to the sphenopalatine foramen. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is triangular or heart-shaped, of a reddish-gray color, and is situated just below the maxillary nerve as it crosses the fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are all branches of maxillary nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • An illustration of the path of the Maxillary nerve. (wikipedia.org)