• outcomes
  • Sharon Bissell Sotelo, Director, Mexico, articulates the Foundation's support for new initiatives to improve maternal health outcomes in Mexico through strengthening midwifery care. (macfound.org)
  • Poverty, maternal health, and outcomes for the child are all interconnected. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to a 2004 WHO publication, sociodemographic factors such as age, access to resources and income level are significant indicators of maternal outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of the mother dying before the child becomes an adult increases by more advanced maternal age, such as can be demonstrated by the following data from France in 2007: Advanced maternal age continues to be associated with a range of adverse pregnancy outcomes including low birth weight, pre-term birth, stillbirth, unexplained fetal death, and increased rates of Caesarean section. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Society for Maternal-fetal Medicine (SMFM) strives to improve maternal and child outcomes by standards of prevention, diagnosis and treatment through research, education and training. (wikipedia.org)
  • The small number of cases makes the evaluation of maternal mortality practically impossible Historically, the study of negative outcomes have been highly successful in preventing their causes, this strategy of prevention therefore faces difficulties when if the number of negative outcome drop to low levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fetal Medicine
  • Twelve Maternal-Fetal Medicine faculty, five mid-level providers, and six MFM fellows care for women at the Maternal and Infant Care Clinic at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Clinics at Arlington, Yakima, and Valley Medical Center, and the Prenatal Diagnosis and Fetal Treatment Program at Seattle Children's Hospital. (washington.edu)
  • The faculty in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine has individual expertise in subspecialty areas in MFM such that the division as a whole has clinical breadth and depth across the entire spectrum of Maternal-fetal medicine. (washington.edu)
  • The faculty of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine practice at several sites across Washington, and are continuing to expand their care and services to patients throughout the region. (washington.edu)
  • University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) is the primary Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) practice site with approximately 1900 deliveries annually. (washington.edu)
  • Full and consultative obstetrical/maternal-fetal medicine care, obstetrical ultrasound, antepartum testing (NST), psychiatry support, lactation support, Telemedicine with Yakima MFM Clinic. (washington.edu)
  • ARNP students, fellows from Infectious Disease, residents in the Department of Pharmacy, Maternal-Fetal Medicine fellows from the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Madigan Army Medical Center, and visiting international scholars rotate through this clinic. (washington.edu)
  • Columbia, MD - The Center for Maternal Fetal Medicine at Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine has been awarded practice reaccreditation in obstetrical ultrasound and is newly accredited in fetal echocardiography (one of only four in Maryland to attain this accreditation) by the Ultrasound Practice Council of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The Center for Maternal Fetal Medicine (CMFM) achieved this recognition by meeting rigorous voluntary guidelines set by the diagnostic ultrasound profession. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Dr. Hyagriv Simhan talks about teleMFM (maternal-fetal medicine) expert consultations for high risk pregnancies. (upmc.com)
  • Maternal-Fetal Medicine Telemedicine","http://videoserver.upmc.com/iPhone-src/OTTELEMFMipad.mp4","Dr. Hyagriv Simhan talks about teleMFM expert consultations for high risk pregnancies. (upmc.com)
  • Maternal-fetal medicine specialists are specialists within the field of obstetrics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal-fetal medicine began to emerge as a discipline in the 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, maternal-fetal medicine specialists can be found in major hospitals internationally. (wikipedia.org)
  • The field of maternal-fetal medicine is one of the most rapidly evolving fields in medicine especially regarding the fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal-fetal medicine specialists attend to patients who fall within certain levels of maternal care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal-fetal medicine specialists are obstetrician-gynecologists who undergo an additional 3 years of specialized training in the assessment and management of high-risk pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal-fetal medicine specialists have training in obstetric ultrasound, invasive prenatal diagnosis using amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling, and the management of high-risk pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • mothers
  • However, in the context of maternal depression, trauma or disturbed bonding in her own early life, some mothers have significant difficulty in tolerating the exploration and-or the infant's anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal feminism is the belief of many early feminists that women as mothers and caregivers had an important but distinctive role to play in society and in politics. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the WCTU saw women purely as wives and mothers, accepting the constraints of maternal feminism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal hypothyroidism is hypothyroidism in pregnant mothers. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study also looked at neural development in rats and found that maternal hypothyroidism in rat mothers is related to deterioration, damage, disorganization and malformation of neurons and dendrites in the pups, which may result from an impaired antioxidant defense system and high levels of oxidative stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adults who experienced high maternal sensitivity during their childhood were found to be more secure than those who experienced less sensitive mothers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some research suggests that adult mothers display more maternal sensitivity than adolescent mothers who may in turn have children with a lower IQ and reading level than children of adult mothers. (wikipedia.org)
  • These typically involve examining the phenotype of the organisms one generation later than in a conventional (zygotic) screen, as their mothers will be potentially homozygous for maternal effect mutations that arise. (wikipedia.org)
  • The maternal wall is a term referring to stereotypes and various forms of discrimination encountered by working mothers and mothers seeking employment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pliny the Elder also comments at length about the phenomenon of postpartum maternal impression in bears, i.e., the folk belief that newborn bears must be licked and molded into bear-shape by their mothers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Maternal Mortality Ratio is a key performance indicator for efforts to improve the health and safety of mothers before, during, and after childbirth per country worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reproductive
  • USAID's Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP) supports delivery of high-impact reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health (RMNCAH) services in 25 USAID priority countries. (wilsoncenter.org)
  • All or most of the children living in these communities are by nature vulnerable," said Melanie Yahner of Save the Children at a recent Wilson Center event on the sexual, reproductive, and maternal health of urban adolescents. (wilsoncenter.org)
  • Advanced maternal age is associated with adverse reproductive effects such as increased risk of infertility, and that the children have chromosomal abnormalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Because of the inheritance pattern of maternal effect mutations, special genetic screens are required to identify them. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this body of work, Archer argued that accumulative maternal effects via the non-genetic evolution of matrilineal nutrient metabolism is responsible for the increased global prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • The theory of maternal impression was largely abandoned by the 20th century, with the development of modern genetic theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fetuses may be at risk due to chromosomal or congenital abnormalities, maternal disease, infections, genetic diseases and growth restriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • motherhood
  • The maternal wall is regarded as a self-imposed barrier, where women expecting motherhood self-select into occupations that require lower levels of skill and education because they anticipate less participation in the labor force over their lifetime. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Hear about the imbalance of high-tech maternal health care in the United States vs. the developing world. (pbs.org)
  • WIDE ANGLE sat down with public health experts to discuss the causes of maternal death and the progress of mid-level, surgical clinicians who dot across Mozambique and the rest of the world. (pbs.org)
  • Welcome to the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Division web site. (in.gov)
  • You can click on the Maternal and Child Health title to the left to return to this welcome page. (in.gov)
  • The Maternal and Infant Health Assessment, or MIHA, is an annual, statewide-representative survey of women with a recent live birth in California. (ca.gov)
  • MIHA is a collaborative effort of the Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health (MCAH) and the Women, Infant & Children (WIC) Division of the California Department of Public Health and the Center on Social Disparities in Health at the University of California, San Francisco . (ca.gov)
  • The MIHA project is supported by the California Department of Public Health using federal funds from the Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. (ca.gov)
  • In 2010 the U.S. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations described maternal mortality as a "sentinel event", and uses it to assess the quality of a health care system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, maternal mortality rates reflect disparities between wealthy and poor countries more than any other measure of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, obesity theorist Edward Archer published "The Childhood Obesity Epidemic as a Result of Nongenetic Evolution: The Maternal Resources Hypothesis" and a series of works on maternal effects in human obesity and health. (wikipedia.org)
  • The result was the monograph Maternal Care and Mental Health published in 1951, which sets out the maternal deprivation hypothesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The limited empirical data and lack of comprehensive theory to account for the conclusions in Maternal Care and Mental Health led to the subsequent formulation of attachment theory by Bowlby. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the publication of Maternal Care and Mental Health Bowlby sought new understanding from such fields as evolutionary biology, ethology, developmental psychology, cognitive science and control systems theory and drew upon them to formulate the innovative proposition that the mechanisms underlying an infant's ties emerged as a result of evolutionary pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bowlby claimed to have made good the "deficiencies of the data and the lack of theory to link alleged cause and effect" in Maternal Care and Mental Health in his later work Attachment and Loss published between 1969 and 1980. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal mortality is a sentinel event to assess the quality of a health care system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal health in Angola is a very complicated issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the Sub-Saharan region of Africa where Angola is located, poor maternal health has been an ongoing problem contributing to the decreased level of health in the population in the early 21st century. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Maternal health is an important factor in determining the status of health in all countries as the health of newborns, which depends on the health of the mother, has an effect on the developmental stages of each individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In Angola, maternal health is affected by many different factors, including the country's history, economic state, and overall prevalence of infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • These figures represent improvement since the end of the War, although they still are very high and show the need for improvement in maternal health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal health is considerably more important because it is directly related to the health of an unborn child. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases, political conflict, cultural beliefs, health systems and practices all contribute to the health of a population by influencing maternal health. (wikipedia.org)
  • child
  • A maternal bond is the relationship between a mother and her child. (wikipedia.org)
  • This site contains information about the programs within the MCH Division as well as data about the maternal and child population of Indiana. (in.gov)
  • Maternal sensitivity affects child development at all stages through life, from infancy, all the way to adulthood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent studies have shown that maternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can negatively impact a mother's sensitivity during stressful moments with her child that serve as traumatic reminders and that this quite likely has a neural basis in the maternal brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maternal sensitivity is most commonly assessed during naturalistic observation of free play interactions between mother and child. (wikipedia.org)
  • While some observational studies focus strictly on the relationship between mother and child during close interaction such as feeding or free play, other studies look into how well the maternal figure divides her attention between the baby and other everyday activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The conception of a maternal impression rests on the belief that a powerful mental (or sometimes physical) influence working on the mother's mind may produce an impression, either general or definite, on the child she is carrying. (wikipedia.org)
  • In folklore, maternal imprinting, or Versehen[citation needed] (a German noun meaning "inadvertance" or as a verb "to provide") as it is usually called, is the belief that a sudden fear of some object or animal in a pregnant woman can cause her child to bear the mark of it. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term maternal deprivation is a catch-phrase summarising the early work of psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, John Bowlby on the effects of separating infants and young children from their mother (or mother substitute) although the effect of loss of the mother on the developing child had been considered earlier by Freud and other theorists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sigmund Freud may have been among the first to stress the potential effect of loss of the mother on the developing child, but his concern was less with the actual experience of maternal care than with the anxiety the child might feel about the loss of the nourishing breast. (wikipedia.org)
  • congenital
  • Maternal impression, according to a long-discredited medical theory, was a phenomenon that explained the existence of birth defects and congenital disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bowlby
  • Mary Ainsworth, who worked with Bowlby, along with her colleagues created the concept of maternal sensitivity in 1978 in order to describe early mother-infant interaction observed in her empirical studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • decline
  • A woman's fertility peaks lasts during the twenties and first half of thirties, after which it starts to decline, with advanced maternal age causing an increased risk of female infertility. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the UK, for example, the most dramatic decline in maternal death was achieved in Rochdale, an industrial town in the poorest area of England. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infant
  • MFM faculty have outpatient clinical practices at the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC-Maternal and Infant Care Clinic) where the most complex maternal and/or fetal medical conditions are referred for care. (washington.edu)
  • adult
  • Also, maternal sensitivity has been found to affect the person psychologically even as an adult. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the adult becomes a parent themselves, their own understanding of maternal sensitivity will affect their own children's development. (wikipedia.org)
  • disability
  • The 2003 article "Global burden of maternal death and disability" noted that the definition leaves out a segment of the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • circulation
  • Maternal oxytocin circulation is said to predispose women to bond and show bonding behavior, although this has been disputed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normally the maternal circulation and the fetal circulation are kept from direct contact with each other, with gas and nutrient exchange taking place across a membrane in the placenta made of two layers, the syncytiotrophoblast and the cytotrophoblast. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is estimated that less than 1 mL of foetal blood is lost to the maternal circulation during normal labour in around 96% of normal deliveries. (wikipedia.org)
  • women
  • Trollope thought that financially secure women should go beyond providing moral education to their children, and should express in public their maternal values, social concerns and caring outlook. (wikipedia.org)
  • To some early feminists, such as the novelist Fanny Fern (1811-72) and the temperance leader Letitia Youmans (1827-96), maternal feminism was simply a strategy through which women could achieve their goal of equal rights. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, women became active in social reform in the early 1830s, but were constrained by traditional concepts of maternal feminism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Talking of this period Veronica Strong-Boag (b. 1947) said, "Women themselves, like virtually everyone else in Canadian society, identified their sex with a maternal role. (wikipedia.org)
  • She sometimes used maternal feminist rhetoric when calling women to become socialist. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 19th and early 20th centuries there were strong ties between maternal feminism and the suffrage and temperance movements, both of which aimed to improve the conditions of women and children at home and at work. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women hit the maternal wall when they encounter workplace discrimination because of past, present, or future pregnancies or because they have taken one or more maternity leaves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both men and women with caregiving responsibilities, such as taking care of a sick parents or spouse, may also result in maternal wall discrimination. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, women who experience difficulty conceiving may be referred to a maternal-fetal specialist for assistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • 20th
  • Christina Hoff Sommers, a critic of late 20th century feminism, has defined maternal feminism as a "recognition that the sexes are equal but different. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • In genetics, a maternal effect occurs when the phenotype of an organism is determined by the genotype of its mother. (wikipedia.org)
  • initiatives
  • Suffering from an acute shortage of doctors, Mozambique's bold grassroots initiatives have cut the maternal death rate in half. (pbs.org)