• national vaccination
  • Flag icons denote the first announcements of confirmed cases by the respective nation-states, their first deaths (and other major events such as their first intergenerational cases, cases of zoonosis, and the start of national vaccination campaigns), and relevant sessions and announcements of the World Health Organization (WHO), the European Union (and its agency the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control), and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Some governments pay all or part of the costs of vaccinations in a national vaccination schedule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vaccines
  • The consultancy says the technology, which has been incorporated into the Occoris product, would be particularly suited to emergency vaccination programmes in natural disaster areas where healthcare workers struggle to keep vaccines refrigerated. (designweek.co.uk)
  • It suspends virtually all Constitutional rights of Massachusetts citizens and forces anyone "suspected" of being infected to submit to interrogations, "decontaminations" and vaccines, according to Mike Adams . (infowars.com)
  • A prudent consequence would be to establish careful survey systems alongside with mass application of new adjuvanted vaccines, or to hold mass vaccination in reserve for use only in situations of true need, such as would arise with the emergence of a more virulent new H1N1 virus strain, or to use non-adjuvanted vaccines in individuals who are potentially at risk for adverse side effects. (blogspot.com)
  • With some vaccines, a goal of vaccination policies is to eradicate the disease - make it disappear from Earth altogether. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eradication
  • Interruption of person-to-person transmission of the virus by vaccination is important in the global polio eradication, since there is no long term carrier state for poliovirus in individuals with normal immune function, polio viruses have no non-primate reservoir in nature, and survival of the virus in the environment for an extended period of time appears to be remote. (wikipedia.org)
  • campaigns
  • The authors discuss the implications of this for the organisation and planning of mass immunisation campaigns. (whale.to)
  • Seroprevalences were consistently higher in subgroups that received two doses through mass campaigns than in subgroups that received all doses through the routine program, especially for poliovirus type 3. (ehesp.fr)
  • The findings suggest that adding further doses of OPV to the routine schedule is unlikely to have as great an impact on the immune state of children as administering the same number of doses during mass campaigns. (ehesp.fr)
  • Effectiveness
  • incremental cost effectiveness ratio of vaccination expressed as net cost in 2007 rupees per life year saved. (bmj.com)
  • Vaccination cost 8023 rupees (about £100, €113, $165) per life year saved, less than India's per capita gross domestic product, a common criterion for cost effectiveness. (bmj.com)
  • If this parameter was increased to its upper limit, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio for vaccination still fell between one and three times the per capita gross domestic product, meeting the World Health Organization's criterion for "cost effective" interventions. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Across a wide range of assumptions, mass RIX4414 vaccination in India would probably prevent substantial morbidity and mortality at a cost per life year saved below typical thresholds of cost effectiveness. (bmj.com)
  • Several factors including cost, vaccination stigma, and acquired resistance limit the effectiveness of antiviral therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • Safety trials conducted to date have not specifically taken these possible side effects into account, and unexpected serious adverse effects thus may follow in the wake of a general vaccination program. (blogspot.com)
  • deaths
  • Results In the base case, vaccination prevented 28 943 (29.7%) symptomatic episodes, 6981 (38.2%) severe episodes, 164 deaths (41.0%), 7178 (33.3%) outpatient visits, and 812 (34.3%) admissions to hospital per 100 000 children. (bmj.com)
  • efforts
  • It's also sets fines up to $1,000 per day for anyone who refuses to submit to quarantines, vaccinations, decontamination efforts or to follow any other verbal order by virtually any state-licensed law enforcement or medical personnel. (infowars.com)
  • children
  • Rational individuals will attempt to minimize the risk of illness, and will seek vaccination for themselves or their children if they perceive a high threat of disease and a low risk to vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • It often occurs in outbreaks in moderately developed countries where children are not exposed when young and vaccination is not widespread. (wikipedia.org)
  • emergency
  • The effort is being coordinated by UHS, RC/MERT (University of Rochester River Campus Medical Emergency Response Team), University Environmental Health & Safety and the Monroe County Office of Emergency Preparedness…'We will have to give about 600 vaccinations an hour to meet our goal,' said Ralph Manchester, MD, vice provost and UHS director. (beforeitsnews.com)
  • The event began in 2011 to test Vanderbilt University Medical Center's emergency mass vaccination plan as if there really were a public health emergency requiring mass vaccination, and to help assure that Vanderbilt protects its faculty, staff, volunteers, students, and thereby its patients, from the flu. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • areas
  • Given the minimal impact that water and sanitation measures have had on the burden of rotavirus in developing areas, there is wide agreement that effective vaccination represents the most promising prevention strategy against the disease. (bmj.com)
  • virus
  • BEIJING - China kicked off mass vaccinations for swine flu Monday in Beijing, making it apparently the first nation in the world to start innoculating its population against the virus. (prisonplanet.com)
  • The agency also lowered the age of HPV (a sexually-transmitted virus) vaccination to include nine-year-olds. (wearechange.org)
  • policies
  • To eliminate the risk of disease outbreaks, at various times governments and other institutions established policies requiring vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • The emphasis therefore shifted to active searches to find cases, coupled with contact tracing, rigorous isolation of patients, and vaccination and surveillance of contacts to contain outbreaks. (springer.com)
  • cost
  • Uncertainty analysis indicated a 94.7% probability that vaccination would be cost effective according to a criterion of one times per capita gross domestic product per life year saved, and a 97.8% probability that it would be cost effective according to a criterion of three times per capita gross domestic product. (bmj.com)
  • agreement
  • He said the vaccination agreement would save the lives of tens of thousands of dogs in Bali and "create a historic reference in the global fight against rabies. (thebalitimes.com)
  • Safe
  • Common objections included government intervention in personal matters or that proposed vaccinations were not sufficiently safe. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Piece by piece, in the US-and undoubtedly in other countries-the groundwork is being laid for huge networks that can, at a moment's notice, go live and mass-vaccinate extraordinary numbers of people. (beforeitsnews.com)
  • Submit
  • Germans Being Mass Brainwashed by TV to Submit to Islam See the rest on the Alex Jones YouTube channel . (prisonplanet.com)