• marine mammals
  • The fossil record of marine mammals is heavily biased toward the northern hemisphere - making localities like New Zealand (where I did my Ph.D.), Australia, Antarctica, and especially South America ripe targets for paleontological exploration. (blogspot.com.br)
  • Marine mammals are today linked to cold water temperatures and high primary productivity - making good marine mammal watching (typically) latitudinally constrained. (blogspot.com.br)
  • Similar biases affect the fossil record of marine mammals - marine mammals are geologically young ( Ischyrorhynchus vanbenedeni , a longirostrine relative of the modern Amazon river dolphin Inia ). (blogspot.com.br)
  • Multiple groups of marine mammals have made the plunge (excuse the pun) and returned to life in the sea. (blogspot.com.br)
  • While modern animals can simply be observed by someone with a notebook and binoculars, fossilized marine mammals have been dead for a long time and don't exactly move around a whole lot - so paleontologists interested in the evolution of secondarily aquatic tetrapods have to examine anatomical (chiefly, skeletal, owing to the nature of the fossil record) evidence. (blogspot.com.br)