• fibroblasts
  • These cell types can be classified as a) cells that are physiologically under high mechanical tension (e.g., smooth muscle in the wall of hollow organs, epithelial and endothelial cells), b) cells that have high rates of proliferation (e.g., myoblasts), and c) cells that are actively migrating (e.g., fibroblasts and macrophages). (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • Soluble products from antigen stimulated Trypanosoma cruzi-immune spleen cells enhanced the expression of Ia antigens on proteose-peptone-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages (M phi). (rupress.org)
  • By way of explaining Cohn's importance, one commentator has noted that macrophages "are scavenger cells of the immune system that engulf and digest invaders, including bacteria and other pathogens, as well as toxins and dead cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cavity
  • In the pancreas it leads to acute pancreatitis, a condition where the pancreatic enzymes leak out into the peritoneal cavity, and liquefy the membrane by splitting the triglyceride esters into fatty acids through fat saponification. (wikipedia.org)
  • signalling pathway
  • Further, glutamine has a dose-dependent effect on the activation of macrophages, in both groups, when stimulated with LPS, inducing a decrease in TNF-α and IL-1α production and negatively modulating the NF-κB signalling pathway. (biomedsearch.com)
  • It appears that unlike IL-6 signalling in macrophages, which is dependent upon activation of the NFκB signalling pathway, intramuscular IL-6 expression is regulated by a network of signalling cascades, including the Ca2+/NFAT and glycogen/p38 MAPK pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacterial
  • In a 2009 biographical memoir, Carol L. Moberg and Steinman wrote that "Zanvil Cohn may be most remembered as the founder of modern macrophage biology and for leading the shift in mid-twentieth-century research from bacterial cells to host-parasite relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytotoxic
  • Catalase and leupeptin produced effects unique for the macrophage cell type, with survival closely correlating to the types and quantities of cytotoxic substances associated with the macrophage. (vcu.edu)
  • Expression
  • The expression of transferrin binding activity was examined in macrophages exhibiting qualitatively and quantitatively different degrees of functional activation. (eurekamag.com)
  • Latest research have shown that some macrophages could develop from sources other than these standard origins possibly iNOS/arginase expression in MPMs, RAMs and RPMs. (sgkinhibitor.com)
  • interleukin
  • Macrophages incubated with chicken cystatin alone or with interferon-γ plus chicken cystatin produced increased amounts of both tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 10. (wiley.com)
  • cells
  • Dr. Cohn's experiments," reported the Times in his obituary, "threw light on the functions of T-cells, made in the bone marrow, and macrophages, large cells that can surround and digest foreign substances like protozoa and bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • substances
  • Catalase, leupeptin, or hydrogen peroxide were added to macrophage cultures or N. fowleri lysate prior to coincubation or during co-incubation to determine possible roles of hydrogen peroxide and proteases in macrophage susceptibility to N. fowleri lytic substances. (vcu.edu)
  • activity
  • Glutathione content of the macrophages increased when they were exposed to LPS, and this increase was, at least in part, attributable to the induced activity of the cystine transport. (biochemj.org)
  • This suggests that a substantial portion of the binding activity is localized within the macrophage. (eurekamag.com)
  • Results
  • He published several papers on his results, demonstrating the successful treatment of cancer in animals using macrophages and antibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemical
  • Catalase is an enzyme which breaks down hydrogen peroxide, a chemical released from activated macrophages, which could contribute to macrophage-induced cytotoxicity. (vcu.edu)