• inhibitors
  • Trypsin inhibitors require a specific three-dimensional structure in order to follow through with inactivation of trypsin in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amount of soy inhibitors is directly related to the amount of trypsin it will inhibit, therefore a product with high concentration of soy is suspect to produce large values of inhibition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most successful methods found so far include: Heat Freezing Addition of Sulfites While trypsin inhibitors have been widely regarded as anti-nutritive factors in soy, research is currently being done on the inhibitors' possible anti-carcinogenic characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • methylation
  • Nowadays most suppliers offer modified trypsin where selective methylation of the lysines limits the autolytic activity to the arginine cutting sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trypsin should be stored at very cold temperatures (between −20 and −80°C) to prevent autolysis, which may also be impeded by storage of trypsin at pH 3 or by using trypsin modified by reductive methylation. (wikipedia.org)
  • zymogen
  • Enteropeptidase converts trypsinogen (a zymogen) into its active form trypsin, resulting in the subsequent activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Enteropeptidase is a type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) localized to the brush border of the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and synthesized as a zymogen, proenteropeptidase, which requires activation by duodenase or trypsin. (wikipedia.org)
  • digestion
  • Internal acetylations (on lysine) and phosphorylations were only noted with trypsin in-gel digestion and HPLC fraction analysis. (umd.edu)
  • Premature trypsin activation can be destructive and may trigger a series of events that lead to pancreatic self-digestion. (wikipedia.org)
  • adherent
  • For strongly adherent cell lines, trypsin of 2.5 % to 0.25% (10X to 1X power) is used. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In a tissue culture lab, trypsin is used to resuspend cells adherent to the cell culture dish wall during the process of harvesting cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibition
  • However, some regularity prevails such as the presence of lysine at position P1 indicating strong inhibition of trypsin [ PMID: 10708867 ]. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • bind
  • They all react with amine groups and will therefore also bind to amine groups in the side chains of amino acids such as lysine - for this reason it is necessary to be careful in interpreting chromatograms to ensure that the right spot is chosen. (wikipedia.org)
  • degradation
  • Only poly-ubiquitination on defined lysines, mostly on K48 and K29, is related to degradation by the proteasome (referred to as the "molecular kiss of death"), while other polyubiquitinations (e.g. on K63, K11, K6 and M1) and monoubiquitinations may regulate processes such as endocytic trafficking, inflammation, translation and DNA repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • optimal
  • Human trypsin has an optimal operating temperature of about 37°C. In contrast, the Atlantic cod has several types of trypsins for the poikilotherm fish to survive at different body temperatures. (wikipedia.org)