• denominations
  • Mennonites - an ethno-religious group based around the church communities of the Christian Anabaptist denominations named after the Frisian Menno Simons (1496-1561), who, through his writings, articulated and thereby formalized the teachings of earlier Swiss founders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Baptist - Christians who comprise a group of denominations and churches that subscribe to a doctrine that baptism should be performed only for professing believers (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism), and that it must be done by immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling). (wikipedia.org)
  • Membership was open only to members of the Missouri Synod and other Lutherans who were in fellowship with it until the mid-1960s, when it became open to Lutherans of all denominations. (wikipedia.org)
  • As with other Lutheran denominations, this move proved controversial, with some saying it indicated a lack of faith in God. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some denominations, especially Lutherans, have similar beliefs regarding the Eucharist and the Real Presence, though they reject the Roman Catholic concept of transubstantiation, preferring instead, the doctrine of the sacramental union, in which "the body and blood of Christ are so truly united to the bread and wine of the Holy Communion that the two may be identified. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • Thrivent Financial was officially formed on January 1, 2002, with the merger of Aid Association for Lutherans (AAL) and Lutheran Brotherhood (LB), which had been established in 1902 and 1917 respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • consist
  • Vertebrate red blood cells consist mainly of hemoglobin, a complex metalloprotein containing heme groups whose iron atoms temporarily bind to oxygen molecules (O2) in the lungs or gills and release them throughout the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • These blood cells (which are also called corpuscles or "formed elements") consist of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBCs), leukocytes (white blood cells), and thrombocytes (platelets). (wikipedia.org)
  • Eucharist
  • Throughout history, a number of groups have been accused of desecrating the Eucharist, often with grave consequences due to the spiritual importance of the consecrated host. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • Immune complexes, immune cells, and inflammatory molecules can block blood flow and ultimately destroy organs such as the kidney in people with systemic lupus erythematosus, or the insulin-secreting Islet of Langerhans in the pancreas. (dadamo.com)
  • The different types of molecules of the complement system make immune complexes more soluble. (dadamo.com)
  • In most insects, this "blood" does not contain oxygen-carrying molecules such as hemoglobin because their bodies are small enough for their tracheal system to suffice for supplying oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon dioxide
  • most waste carbon dioxide, however, is transported back to the pulmonary capillaries of the lungs as bicarbonate (HCO3−) dissolved in the blood plasma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plasma, which constitutes 55% of blood fluid, is mostly water (92% by volume), and contains dissipated proteins, glucose, mineral ions, hormones, carbon dioxide (plasma being the main medium for excretory product transportation), and blood cells themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • In animals with lungs, arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to the tissues of the body, and venous blood carries carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism produced by cells, from the tissues to the lungs to be exhaled. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial blood
  • Pulse oximetry takes advantage of the hemoglobin color change to directly measure the arterial blood oxygen saturation using colorimetric techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • This protein may play a role in epithelial cell cancer and in vaso-occlusion of red blood cells in sickle cell disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lu/B-CAM is observed not only on red blood cells, but also on a subset of muscle and epithelial cells in various tissues. (uni-goettingen.de)
  • In our blood the dominant thing in there are cells and red blood cell are the most abundant. (lifepositivism.com)
  • These red cells contains haemoglobin,which is a substance which maintains and sustains the red blood cells haemoglobin comprises two parts ;The heme part which is the part containing iron complex and a globulin part which is the important part and it's a protein. (lifepositivism.com)
  • This is a classification of the blood in the human body based on either the presence or absence of antibodies and also based on the presence or absence of inherited antigenic substances on the surface of Red blood cells. (lifepositivism.com)
  • Close up: Red blood cells. (medfriendly.com)
  • blood cells. (medfriendly.com)
  • a ray-finned type of fish] with closely related species) red blood cells have a nucleus. (medfriendly.com)
  • Because of the lack of DNA and RNA, red blood cells have limited ability to repair themselves. (medfriendly.com)
  • Sensitisation of a D mother with D fetal red blood cells occurs typically at birth when fetal D cells cross into the maternal circulation. (ndtv.com)
  • In a subsequent pregnancy, entry of even a few fetal red blood cells into the maternal circulation induces a secondary anti-D response and such antibodies can cross the placenta and bind red blood cells. (ndtv.com)
  • On red blood cells they are in the form of fat-soluble glycolipids, and in secretions they occur as water-soluble glycoproteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a type of anemia in which the red blood cells (RBC) of the fetus are destroyed by maternal antibodies in an immune response targeted against the fetus. (medindia.net)
  • Myelodysplastic Syndromes are a group of conditions that cause insufficient production of blood cells, which is often lethal. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Red blood cells (RBCs), also called erythrocytes, are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrate's principal means of delivering oxygen (O2) to the body tissues-via blood flow through the circulatory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, mature red blood cells are flexible and oval biconcave disks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately a quarter of the cells in the human body are red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nearly half of the blood's volume (40% to 45%) is red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Red blood cells are also known as RBCs, red cells, red blood corpuscles, haematids, erythroid cells or erythrocytes (from Greek erythros for "red" and kytos for "hollow vessel", with -cyte translated as "cell" in modern usage). (wikipedia.org)
  • Packed red blood cells (pRBC) are red blood cells that have been donated, processed, and stored in a blood bank for blood transfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Almost all vertebrates, including all mammals and humans, have red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Red blood cells are cells present in blood in order to transport oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The color of red blood cells is due to the heme group of hemoglobin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blood plasma alone is straw-colored, but the red blood cells change color depending on the state of the hemoglobin: when combined with oxygen the resulting oxyhemoglobin is scarlet, and when oxygen has been released the resulting deoxyhemoglobin is of a dark red burgundy color. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having oxygen-carrying proteins inside specialized cells (as opposed to oxygen carriers being dissolved in body fluid) was an important step in the evolution of vertebrates as it allows for less viscous blood, higher concentrations of oxygen, and better diffusion of oxygen from the blood to the tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • red blood cell width is on average about 25% larger than capillary diameter, and it has been hypothesized that this improves the oxygen transfer from red blood cells to tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • The red blood cells of mammals are typically shaped as biconcave disks: flattened and depressed in the center, with a dumbbell-shaped cross section, and a torus-shaped rim on the edge of the disk. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there are some exceptions concerning shape in the artiodactyl order (even-toed ungulates including cattle, deer, and their relatives), which displays a wide variety of bizarre red blood cell morphologies: small and highly ovaloid cells in llamas and camels (family Camelidae), tiny spherical cells in mouse deer (family Tragulidae), and cells which assume fusiform, lanceolate, crescentic, and irregularly polygonal and other angular forms in red deer and wapiti (family Cervidae). (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood is a body fluid in humans and other animals that delivers necessary substances such as nutrients and oxygen to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away from those same cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vertebrates, it is composed of blood cells suspended in blood plasma. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blood cells are mainly red blood cells (also called RBCs or erythrocytes), white blood cells (also called WBCs or leukocytes) and platelets (also called thrombocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The most abundant cells in vertebrate blood are red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jawed vertebrates have an adaptive immune system, based largely on white blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • White blood cells help to resist infections and parasites. (wikipedia.org)
  • The average adult has a blood volume of roughly 5 litres (11 US pt), which is composed of plasma and several kinds of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whole blood (plasma and cells) exhibits non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Right tube: Freshly drawn blood One microliter of blood contains: 4.7 to 6.1 million (male), 4.2 to 5.4 million (female) erythrocytes: Red blood cells contain the blood's hemoglobin and distribute oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mature red blood cells lack a nucleus and organelles in mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The red blood cells (together with endothelial vessel cells and other cells) are also marked by glycoproteins that define the different blood types. (wikipedia.org)
  • The combined surface area of all red blood cells of the human body would be roughly 2,000 times as great as the body's exterior surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctrine
  • Those who favored the society prevailed by arguing that the new aid society would prevent Norwegian Lutherans from joining unacceptable secret beneficial societies or "lodges" which was forbidden by conservative Lutheran doctrine. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Albumin is the main protein in plasma, and it functions to regulate the colloidal osmotic pressure of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • These contain hemoglobin, an iron-containing protein, which facilitates oxygen transport by reversibly binding to this respiratory gas and greatly increasing its solubility in blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • RBCs
  • As a result, the immune system of the mother generates antibodies against the fetal Rh factor-bearing RBCs. (medindia.net)
  • If all human hemoglobin were free in the plasma rather than being contained in RBCs, the circulatory fluid would be too viscous for the cardiovascular system to function effectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessels
  • This distinctive biconcave shape optimises the flow properties of blood in the large vessels, such as maximization of laminar flow and minimization of platelet scatter, which suppresses their atherogenic activity in those large vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood is circulated around the body through blood vessels by the pumping action of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular
  • Garcia-Manero and colleagues examined a number of potential molecular and demographic markers to develop a prognostic scoring system for this group by applying them to 856 patients treated at M. D. Anderson between 1976 and 2005. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In terms of anatomy and histology, blood is considered a specialized form of connective tissue, given its origin in the bones and the presence of potential molecular fibers in the form of fibrinogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimation
  • Korop O.A. Integral estimation of efficiency of development of system of the specialized medicare in the conditions of introduction and functioning of general practice - domestic medicine. (ozizdrav.ru)
  • human
  • Over a century has passed since Landsteiner discovered the human blood groups, making the practice of blood transfusion possible. (wiley.com)
  • All this new information has made the production of a second edition of Human Blood Groups timely. (wiley.com)
  • 1 Human Blood Groups: Introduction, Terminology, and Functions. (wiley.com)
  • The immune sera ('anti- Rh ') obtained by this stimulus reacted with 85% of adult human blood samples. (springer.com)
  • Human blood fractioned by centrifugation: Plasma (upper, yellow layer), buffy coat (middle, thin white layer) and erythrocyte layer (bottom, red layer) can be seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • HOUSTON - A new scoring system for a form of leukemia known as myelody. (bio-medicine.org)
  • HOUSTON - A new scoring system for a form of leukemia known as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) identifies patients who appear to have low-risk disease but actually have poor prospects of survival, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report online at the journal Leukemia. (bio-medicine.org)
  • churches
  • Old Catholic Church - number of Ultrajectine Christian churches that originated with groups that split from the Roman Catholic Church over certain doctrines, most importantly that of papal infallibility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amish - Amish, sometimes referred to as Amish Mennonites, are a group of Christian church fellowships that form a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Oriental Orthodox Churches, such as the Coptic Church, insist "on the reality of the change from bread and wine into the body and the blood of Christ at the consecration of the elements", although they have "never attempted to explain the manner of the change", thus rejecting philosophical terms to describe it. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lutheran World Federation, the largest communion of Lutheran churches, represents over 74 million people. (wikipedia.org)
  • donors
  • RBC genotyping of 419 blood donors was performed using a Lifecodes RBC/RBC-R typing kit (Immucor, Norcross, GA). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • fibrin
  • There is activation of the coagulation process with consumption of platelets and coagulation factors with thrombin formation overwhelming the normal inhibition system and resulting in systemic fibrin deposition. (brainscape.com)
  • circulatory
  • The cell membrane is composed of proteins and lipids, and this structure provides properties essential for physiological cell function such as deformability and stability while traversing the circulatory system and specifically the capillary network. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insects and some mollusks use a fluid called hemolymph instead of blood, the difference being that hemolymph is not contained in a closed circulatory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • church
  • In the late 19th and early 20th century, the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod forbade its members to join fraternal societies because these required initiation rites and secret oaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1899, Albert Voecks, a member of St. Paul Lutheran Church in Appleton, Wisconsin, broached the idea of creating an insurance society for Lutherans to fellow church members Gottlieb Ziegler and William Zuehlke. (wikipedia.org)
  • The roots of Lutheran Brotherhood go back to the founding convention of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America when Jacob Preus, the state insurance commissioner of Minnesota, proposed launching a not-for-profit aid society. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the Catholic Church, therefore, his "body, blood, soul and divinity" in the form of the consecrated host are adored. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1597, theologians in Wittenberg defined the title Lutheran as referring to the true church. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • PathType is a searchable database of blood group and disease associations, clinical correlates and citations. (dadamo.com)
  • Garcia-Manero says the scoring system is being applied in prospective clinical trials that are under way or planned at M. D. Anderson. (bio-medicine.org)