Loading...



  • patients
  • Background: Laboratory-induced dyspnea (breathing discomfort) in healthy subjects is widely used to study perceptual mechanisms, yet the relationship between laboratory-induced dyspnea in healthy volunteers and spontaneous dyspnea in patients with chronic lung disease is not well established. (ebscohost.com)
  • Many Obstructive Sleep Apnoea OSA patients wake up before their throat muscles have recovered and are frightened by the sensation of choking, but breathing will always resume after a few seconds. (thetole.com)
  • medical
  • Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Please let us have your Obstructive Sleep Apnoea OSA medical reports if any, then we can tailore made the suitable herbal medicine to over come these conditions. (thetole.com)
  • cough
  • Using voluntary cough characteristics to detect obstructive lung disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Other effects include diaphoresis, chest pain, and persistent dry cough, all of which may result in weight loss, anorexia and may also lead to right-side heart enlargement and heart disease in advanced cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Involvement of respiratory muscles results in poor ability to cough and decreased ability to breathe well and leads to collapse of part or all of the lung leading to impaired gas exchange and an overall insufficiency in lung strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • spirometer
  • This technique is based on the assumptions that a known volume and concentration of helium in air begin in the closed spirometer, that the patient has no helium in their lungs, and that an equilibration of helium can occur between the spirometer and the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • idiopathic
  • Examples are: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, of which there are several types Sarcoidosis Eosinophilic pneumonia Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Conditions specifically affecting the interstitium are called interstitial lung diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Guidelines
  • Despite the conflicting research outcomes, the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Guidelines suggest the use of oral acetylcysteine for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in high-risk individuals, given its potential for benefit, low likelihood of adverse effects, and low cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • This disparate group of diseases is defined by the presence of abnormal pulmonary function rather than specific morphologic findings and, consequently, has no characteristic and consistent radiographic appearance. (springer.com)
  • Müller NL, Miller RR (1995) Diseases of the bronchioles: CT and histopathologic findings. (springer.com)
  • Stern EJ, Frank MS (1994) Small-airway diseases of the lungs: findings at expiratory CT. (springer.com)
  • clinical
  • The clinical relevance of this is that, although a normal phenomenon, the nadir of the Ta wave can occur just after the QRS complex and cause ST depression similar to (and easily mistaken with) that occurring with disease states such as cardiac ischaemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • residual volume
  • The lung volumes are tidal volume (VT), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), and residual volume (RV). (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitrogen
  • The technique is based on the assumptions that the nitrogen concentration in the lungs is 78% and in equilibrium with the atmosphere, that the patient inhales 100% oxygen and that the oxygen replaces all of the nitrogen in the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • common diseases
  • Our mission is both a journalistic and educational one: by reporting on common diseases affecting uncommon people, and including the medical facts behind the headlines, we provide a dynamic collection of Teachable Moments in Medicine™ to increase health awareness and medical knowledge. (celebritydiagnosis.com)
  • oxygen
  • Some people may benefit from long-term oxygen therapy or lung transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excessively high concentrations can cause oxygen toxicity such as lung damage or result in respiratory failure in those who are predisposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxygen is often prescribed for people with breathlessness, in the setting of end-stage cardiac or respiratory failure, advanced cancer or neurodegenerative disease, despite having relatively normal blood oxygen levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • measurements
  • The plethysmography technique applies Boyle's law and uses measurements of volume and pressure changes to determine lung volume, assuming temperature is constant. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • It is one of the major air pollutant capable of causing severe heath hazards such as coronary artery disease as well as stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Background: Laboratory-induced dyspnea (breathing discomfort) in healthy subjects is widely used to study perceptual mechanisms, yet the relationship between laboratory-induced dyspnea in healthy volunteers and spontaneous dyspnea in patients with chronic lung disease is not well established. (ebscohost.com)
  • Many Obstructive Sleep Apnoea OSA patients wake up before their throat muscles have recovered and are frightened by the sensation of choking, but breathing will always resume after a few seconds. (thetole.com)
  • medical
  • Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Please let us have your Obstructive Sleep Apnoea OSA medical reports if any, then we can tailore made the suitable herbal medicine to over come these conditions. (thetole.com)
  • COPD
  • North America is projected to be the leading regional market for respiratory exercisers as a result of increasing cases of COPD and various lung diseases in the region. (meerutreporter.com)
  • Akhlaghpour, "Assessing Lung Volumetric Variation to Detect and Stage COPD," Presented at and Published in the Proceedings of the 1st Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering (MECBME'2011), Sharjah, UAE, Feb. 21-24, 2011. (henryford.com)
  • It is estimated that 4% to 5% of the global mortality and disability adjusted life-years (DALYs) are from ARIs, COPD, TB, asthma, lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, and blindness attributed to solid fuel combustion when cooking in developing countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Long-term use of supplemental oxygen improves survival in patients with COPD, but can lead to lung injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recent molecular biology research suggests that the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD may share overlapping pathways involving innate biological susceptibility, coupled with environmental factors which can trigger the different diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence-based COPD guidelines for improving quality of life and exercise capacity, and for reducing morbidity and mortality in those with COPD, from the Australian Lung Foundation. (dmoztools.net)
  • Bronchial
  • Pneumonia Radiation therapy Inhaling chemicals, such as sodium hydroxide Sepsis Adverse reaction to medications Hypersensitivity to inhaled agents Inhalation of spores of some species of mushroom (bronchoalveolar allergic syndrome) Mercury exposure Smoking Overexposure to chlorine Bronchial obstruction (obstructive pneumonitis or post-obstructive pneumonitis) Ascariasis (during parasite migration) Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) "pneumonitis" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary Stedman's medical dictionary (28th ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The eNO levels also tend to vary according to the results of lung function test results such as the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Recently, chest ultrasound has become an attractive new tool for assessing lung status in ventilated critically ill patients, as suggested by the increasing number of articles written about it by physicians practicing in chest, intensive care or emergency medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As a matter of fact, chest ultrasound can be used easily at the bedside to assess initial lung morphology in severely hypoxemic patients [ 2 ] and can be easily repeated, allowing the effects of therapy to be monitored. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the ICU, bedside chest radiography is routinely performed on a daily basis and is considered as a reference for assessing lung status in critically ill patients with acute lung injury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Treating patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) to reduce their levels of low-density lipoprotein-choles-terol (LDL-C) to 77 mg/dl with a high dose of atorvastatin (Pfizer) 80 mg daily from their starting LDL-C level of 100 mg/dl resulted in a significant reduction in the risk of major coronary events, compared with low-dose daily to achieve an LDL-C of 100 mg/dl. (cheapmedicinechest.com)
  • chest
  • A cut is made in your chest and the damaged lungs removed. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The donated lungs will then be connected to the relevant airways and blood vessels and the chest will be closed. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Lung image formation during CT relies on a physical principle similar to that used for image formation during chest radiography: the X-rays hitting the film or the CT detector depend on tissue absorption, which is linearly correlated to physical tissue density. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Chest pain associated with MVP is different from chest pain associated with coronary artery disease. (nebraskamed.com)
  • Those can be radiation therapy of the chest , exposure to medications used during chemo-therapy, the inhalation of debris (ie animal dander), of food particles during vomiting, herbicides or fluorocarbons and some systemic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • It is classically an acute condition, appearing in infants, people taking antibiotics or immunosuppressant medications, or immunocompromising diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • visualization
  • The diagnosis and drainage of localized pneumothorax and empyema, the assessment of lung recruitment following positive end-expiratory pressure and/or recruitment maneuver, the assessment of lung over-inflation, and the evaluation of aeration loss and its distribution all require direct visualization of the lungs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Clinical
  • Clinical trials have looked at whether tailoring asthma therapy based on eNO values is better than conventional care, in which therapy is gauged by symptoms and the results of lung function tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extensive collection of evidence-based guidelines on all critical clinical aspects of lung cancer, including epidemiology, diagnosis, molecular biology, chemprevention, management and treatment (traditional and complimentary). (dmoztools.net)
  • progression
  • Whether or not smoking affects the progression or incidence of flock worker's lung is a topic of ongoing research as of 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluid
  • Signs and symptoms of flock worker's lung include rales (crackling noises caused by fluid in the lungs), dyspnea (shortness of breath), and coughing. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • For example, a lung transplant wouldn't be recommended for someone with lung cancer because the cancer could reoccur in the donated lungs. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Flock worker's lung may raise the risk for lung cancer, but the connection is a topic of research as of 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the burning of fossil fuels for cooking, heating and lighting accounts for a significant portion of the global burden of death and disease and disproportionately affects women and children in developing regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flock worker's lung is an occupational lung disease caused by exposure to flock, small fibers that are glued to a backing in order to create a specific texture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flock worker's lung is caused by exposure to small pieces of flock, usually nylon, created during the flocking process and inhaled. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease can be subacute or develop over long periods of exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • scan
  • A CT scan of the lungs and histopathology along with a history of working in the flocking industry can diagnose flock worker's lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • breathe
  • The mixture generates less resistance than atmospheric air when passing through the airways of the lungs, and thus requires less effort by a patient to breathe in and out of the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Deep breathing can be painful for some, such as people suffering from particular diseases or injuries resulting from trauma. (meerutreporter.com)
  • Most people who receive lung transplants from living donors have cystic fibrosis and are close relatives of the donors. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The outlook for people who've had a lung transplant has improved in recent years and it's expected to continue improving. (www.nhs.uk)
  • But, it's most often found in people with no other form of heart disease. (nebraskamed.com)
  • treatment
  • The second area of study is related to the application of the PET techniques to understand and optimize treatment of experimental and human cardiopulmonary disease. (massgeneral.org)
  • usually
  • A donor is usually a person who's died, but in rare cases a section of lung can be taken from a living donor. (www.nhs.uk)
  • It's possible for a person to receive a lung transplant from living donors (two living donors are usually required for one recipient). (www.nhs.uk)
  • A lung transplant usually takes between four and 12 hours to complete, depending on the complexity of the operation. (www.nhs.uk)
  • thus
  • His pulmonologist thinks he breathes in some stomach acid/contents and that has damaged his lungs- thus causing the problem. (ourhealth.com)
  • cause
  • Cooking over a traditional open fire or mud stove can cause increased health problems brought on from the smoke, particularly lung and eye ailments, but also birth defects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tobacco use is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • medicine
  • In medicine, it refers to excess oxygen in the lungs or other body tissues, which can be caused by breathing air or oxygen at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality of l
  • By avoiding or quitting tobacco use, overall health and quality of life are improved and risk of disease and premature death are reduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Depending on your individual circumstances, you may be connected to a heart and lung bypass machine to keep your blood circulating during the operation. (www.nhs.uk)
  • With emphysema the shortness of breath due to effective bronchoconstriction from excessive very thick mucous blockage (it is so thick that great difficulty is encountered in expelling it resulting in near exhaustion at times) can bring on panic attacks unless the individual expects this and has effectively learned pursed lip breathing to more quickly transfer oxygen to the blood via the damaged alveoli resulting from the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • death
  • The majority of these studies reported the occurrence of irritation, congestion and edema of the lungs, and even death following prolonged exposures. (wikipedia.org)