• trachea
  • Once there, they burrow through the pulmonary alveoli and travel up the trachea, where they are swallowed and are carried to the small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally, in the early stages of drowning, very little water enters the lungs: a small amount of water entering the trachea causes a muscular spasm that seals the airway and prevents the passage of both air and water until unconsciousness occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • respiration
  • Additionally, recent phylogenetic evidence suggests that mtDNA can "move" between normal cells and tumor cells in canine venereal transmissible cancer ( 16, 17 ), while pathophysiological models of lung injury ( 18, 19 ), lung inflammation ( 19 ), and tumor formation by respiration-deficient tumor cells ( 19 ) have added weight to intercellular mitochondrial transfer being a new (patho)physiological phenomenon. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The lung is the essential respiration organ in many air-breathing animals, including most tetrapods, a few fish and a few snails. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • Macrophages
  • The identification of this novel transport pathway has important consequences for our understanding of lung immunity and suggests more widespread roles for macrophages in the transport of Ags to lymphoid organs than previously appreciated. (ox.ac.uk)
  • edema
  • Secondary drowning Physiological response to foreign matter in the lungs due to drowning causing extrusion of liquid into the lungs (pulmonary edema) which adversely affects breathing Silent drowning Drowning without a noticeable external display of distress. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluid replacement may be required to ensure adequate blood volume, but fluids are given carefully since fluid overload can worsen pulmonary edema, which may be lethal. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Further research is needed, but we are excited about the impact this discovery could have on our ability to regenerate or recreate new lung tissues to replace damaged areas of the lungs. (health24.com)
  • diseases
  • The new unit will be used chiefly to research biomedical questions relating to cancer, osteoporosis, pulmonary diseases and arteriosclerosis. (news-medical.net)
  • However, our research activities also include measuring bone properties in osteoporosis and determining altered sizes of pulmonary alveoli in diverse lung diseases," explains Dr. Klaus Achterhold from the MuCLS team. (news-medical.net)
  • US researchers said they have identified for the first time human lung stem cells that are self-renewing and could offer important clues for treating chronic lung diseases. (health24.com)
  • The discovery of this stem cell has the potential to offer those who suffer from chronic lung diseases a totally novel treatment option by regenerating or repairing damaged areas of the lung. (health24.com)
  • Stem cell therapy on lung diseases has long been elusive because the lung is a highly complex organ with a variety of cell types that can renew at different rates, experts say. (health24.com)
  • Diseases of the pleura requiring surgical treatment include tumours of the pleura and injuries to the lungs or ruptured alveoli, which lead to air accumulating between the lungs and the chest wall (the so-called tyre). (hirslanden.ch)
  • contusion
  • A pulmonary contusion, also known as lung contusion, is a bruise of the lung, caused by chest trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pulmonary contusion is usually caused directly by blunt trauma but can also result from explosion injuries or a shock wave associated with penetrating trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the use of explosives during World Wars I and II, pulmonary contusion resulting from blasts gained recognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The severity ranges from mild to severe: small contusions may have little or no impact on health, yet pulmonary contusion is the most common type of potentially lethal chest trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary contusion is usually accompanied by other injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although associated injuries are often the cause of death, pulmonary contusion is thought to cause death directly in a quarter to half of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, pulmonary contusion is frequently associated with signs (objective indications) and symptoms (subjective states), including those indicative of the lung injury itself and of accompanying injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • This disease, where the chest cavity repeatedly fills up with water and causes a corresponding displacement of the lung, usually occurs when the pleura is affected by a malignant tumour. (hirslanden.ch)
  • A pulmonary shunt occurs as a result of blood flowing right-to-left through cardiac openings or in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • What are the physiologic zones of pulmonary blood flow? (brainscape.com)
  • When arterial pressure drops under 0 mmHg (remember, alveolus pressure is always 0 mm Hg), the blood does not flow around the alveolus. (brainscape.com)
  • This larval form is able to penetrate human skin, travel through the blood vessels and heart, and reach the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are mobile scavengers that serve to engulf foreign particles in the lungs, such as dust, bacteria, carbon particles, and blood cells from injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type I cells are involved in the process of gas exchange between the alveoli and blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells need to be so thin to be readily permeable for enabling an easy gas exchange between the alveoli and the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • migrate
  • We show that murine AM constitutively migrate from lung to dLN and that following exposure to Streptococcus pneumoniae, AM rapidly transport bacteria to this site. (ox.ac.uk)
  • N. americanus has no development arrest in immune hosts and it must migrate through the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial
  • The characteristic radiographic appearance is that of pulmonary hyperlucency, caused by overdistention of the alveoli in conjunction with diminished arterial flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • chest
  • The pleura is the inner membrane that covers both the inside of the chest wall and the surface of the lungs. (hirslanden.ch)
  • Thanks to the pleura, the heart, lungs and chest wall are not bonded to each other and are able to move freely within the chest cavity. (hirslanden.ch)
  • For the adhesion of the chest wall to the lung, the chest wall is slightly roughened and then two drainage tubes ensure that the remaining air is removed from the chest cavity. (hirslanden.ch)
  • They are then removed, the lung is fully re-expanded and partially bonded to the chest wall. (hirslanden.ch)
  • In order to prevent displacement of the lungs, they must be bonded permanently to the chest wall. (hirslanden.ch)
  • Swyer-James syndrome (SJS, also called Swyer-James-Macleod's syndrome) is a rare lung disorder found by English chest physician William Mathiseon Macleod, and (simultaneously) by physician Paul Robert Swyer and radiologist George James in the 1950s in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children are at especially high risk for the injury because the relative flexibility of their bones prevents the chest wall from absorbing force from an impact, causing it to be transmitted instead to the lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • entire lung
  • You have approximately 30 cm of water pressure in the entire lung which means that there is approximatley 15 cm of water from the top of the lung to the middle of the lung and 15 cm of water from the middle to the bottom of the lung. (brainscape.com)
  • The treatment of mesothelioma usually requires the entire lung, including the entire pleura of that side, to be removed. (hirslanden.ch)
  • pressure
  • At the bottom of the lung, you have 15 cm of water pressure sitting on top so the pressure is higher when you add the column of water bringing 25/8 to 36/19 mmhg. (brainscape.com)
  • How does gravity affect air pressure in the alveoli? (brainscape.com)
  • This slight negative pressure is enough to move 500 ml of air into the lungs in 2 seconds required for inspiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • An adult alveolus has an average diameter of 200 micrometres, with an increase in diameter during inhalation. (wikipedia.org)
  • lobar
  • In appearance Swyer-James normally leaves shadowing in a CT scan in the upper lobar regions of one or (rarely) both lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • Dendritic cells (DC) sample the airways, and active transfer of Ag to the lung dLN is considered an exclusive property of migratory DC. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Type II cells also repair the endothelium of the alveolus when it becomes damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • describes
  • This research describes, for the first time, a true human lung stem cell,' said Piero Anversa, director of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and co-author of the study in the New England Journal of Medicine . (health24.com)