• elevation
  • The average nightly low is -9 °C (15 °F), and the average daily high is 8 °C (46 °F). The 3,600 meter (12,000 feet) elevation and the 8 hours of sunshine a day might make it feel pleasant outside. (chinahighlights.com)
  • This sickness affects close to half of all people who begin near to sea level and climb to 14,000 feet of elevation without scheduling enough rest time. (drugs.com)
  • Manali - Rohtang Jot - Gramphu - Kokhsar - Tandi - Keylong - Jispa - Darcha - Zingzingbar - Baralacha La - Bharatpur - Sarchu (state border) - Gata Loops - Nakee La - Lachulung La - Pang - More Plains - Tanglang La - Gya - Upshi - Karu - Leh 1: Manali (altitude 1,950 m (6,400 ft)) to Marhi at 3,300 m (10,800 ft) elevation 33 km (21 mi). (wikipedia.org)
  • At least spend a day or (better) two at the altitude of the trailhead before you hike this trail again or, better yet, find another trail with less elevation gain. (backpacking.net)
  • The normal blood-oxygen saturation for high-elevation dwellers is typically 88 to 93 percent. (summitdaily.com)
  • Scientists in the Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division make yearly research treks to Pikes Peak, where the 14,000-foot (4,260 m) elevation, enables them to validate studies conducted in artificial altitude chambers. (nbcnews.com)
  • Ethnic segregation in nations straddling the world's steepest terrains may be reinforced by the biological tolerance different peoples have to altitude, according to one of the first studies to examine the effect of elevation on ethnic demographics. (phys.org)
  • The biological effects of elevation make altitude a particularly objective and reliable measurement for helping determine and understand how populations around the world's highest areas form, he said. (phys.org)
  • Paik is currently working on a paper that correlates lower levels of violence during the 2008 unrest with lower elevation and greater Tibetan/Han integration. (phys.org)
  • At low elevation, the pressure is higher because the molecules of air are compressed from the weight of the air above them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Altitude decompression may be a natural consequence of unprotected elevation to altitude, or due to intentional or unintentional release of pressurisation of a pressure suit or pressurised compartment, vehicle or habitat, and may be controlled or uncontrolled. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tibetans
  • Tibetans carry a high proportion of an allele that improves oxygen transport. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Tibetans suffer no health problems associated with altitude sickness, but instead produce low levels of blood pigment (haemoglobin) sufficient for less oxygen, more elaborate blood vessels, and exhibit extraordinary high birth weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • The researchers attribute the sudden drop in the Han Chinese population to altitude sickness, and cite existing research showing that Han Chinese are indeed susceptible to altitude sickness in areas in which Tibetans thrive. (phys.org)
  • For example, Tibetans living at high altitudes have a more sensitive hypoxic ventilatory response than do Andean peoples living at similar altitudes, even though both populations exhibit greater aerobic capacity compared to lowlanders. (wikipedia.org)
  • lack of oxygen
  • Mammals that rely on pulmonary ventilation will increase their ventilation to account for the lack of oxygen reaching the tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with these conditions are very complex and usually suffer from several other diseases at the same time, so it is virtually impossible to work out which of their problems is caused by lack of oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • meters
  • More and more tourists are climbing up mountains that are 5000 to almost 7000 meters high, such as Kilimanjaro, without any prior experience at high altitudes. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The authors therefore recommend self-assessment of the following type: anyone who can hike for several hours at a normal pace in the Alps at altitudes of 2500 to 3000 meters ought to be able to tolerate similar exercise one altitude level higher while trekking, though perhaps at a somewhat slower pace. (bio-medicine.org)
  • For example, the types of mosquitoes which carry malaria and dengue fever cannot live at altitudes above 2300 meters (according to the US Centers for Disease Control) as is the case in virtually all of the sierras. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the majority of passenger aircraft, the passengers' oxygen masks are activated automatically if the cabin pressure falls below the atmospheric pressure equivalent of 14,000 feet (~4,500 meters). (wikipedia.org)
  • Himalayas
  • Research from Princeton University published in the journal Applied Geography suggests that people native to low-lying areas can be naturally barred from regions such as the Tibetan Plateau, the Andes or the Himalayas by altitude sickness , which is caused by low oxygen concentration in the air and can be life-threatening. (phys.org)
  • atmospheric
  • The lower atmospheric pressure of the sierras affects some individuals profoundly with difficulty in breathing, nausea and dizziness but these conditions are typically not of long duration and require a period of reduced activity and conservative eating and drinking for acclimatization. (wikipedia.org)
  • It becomes necessary when the aircraft reaches a certain altitude, because the natural atmospheric pressure would be too low to supply sufficient oxygen to the passengers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In engineering and applied physics on the other hand, vacuum refers to any space in which the pressure is lower than atmospheric pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is difficult and prohibitively expensive to conduct some of this research at sea level Though the shortage of air contributes to the effects on the human body, research has found that most altitude sicknesses can be linked to the lack of atmospheric pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • ascent
  • On the other hand, a noticeable loss of physical performance ability during the ascent and a dry cough are early manifestations of high-altitude pulmonary edema. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The experts from France and Italy used ultrasound scans of heart activity on a group of volunteers at sea level and repeated the tests after an ascent by cable car to an altitude of 3,842 m (12,605 ft) on Aiguille du Midi in the French Alps. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • It seems that oxygen is often a limiting factor in an ascent of Everest, and the rebreather would provide a long-lasting oxygen source at nearly body temperature. (pbs.org)
  • Decompression (altitude) refers to the reduction in ambient pressure due to ascent above sea level. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Many health issues are exacerbated, and most people experience altitude sickness. (chinahighlights.com)
  • To better understand why some people adapt well to life at high altitude while others don't, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine studied red blood cells derived from representatives of both groups living in the Andes Mountains. (eurekalert.org)
  • People can live comfortably at moderately high altitudes, but the body must make some adjustments, and this takes time. (drugs.com)
  • This could help show which people may need medicinal help to enable them to operate at altitude. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • People permanently living at high altitudes might experience selection of EPAS1 to reduce the fitness consequences of excessive red blood cell production. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is initially elevated in lowlanders who travel to high altitude, but reduces significantly over time as people acclimatize. (wikipedia.org)
  • Altitude research gets round this by studying the effects of oxygen deprivation on otherwise healthy people. (wikipedia.org)
  • increases
  • As the altitude increases, the percentage of oxygen in the air remains constant but the pressure decreases and the air becomes thinner, making breathing more difficult. (euroclinix.net)
  • Mammals will also experience decreases in aerobic metabolism and oxygen demand, along with increases in ATP production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary
  • Known as "re-entry pulmonary edema," it mysteriously strikes some mountain residents who return from visits to lower elevations. (summitdaily.com)
  • levels
  • Oxygen levels are much lower in Tibet. (chinahighlights.com)
  • The encoded protein contains a basic helix-loop-helix domain protein dimerization domain as well as a domain found in proteins in signal transduction pathways which respond to oxygen levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such precursors include travelling to high altitude locations and living in an environment with high levels of carbon monoxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type I glomus cells of carotid bodies detect the change in oxygen levels and release neurotransmitters towards the carotid sinus nerve, which in turn stimulates the brain, ultimately resulting in increased ventilation. (wikipedia.org)
  • adapt
  • Thus doing a number of things to help the body to adapt to the lower oxygen level is vital in preventing the condition from occurring. (euroclinix.net)