• meters
  • More and more tourists are climbing up mountains that are 5000 to almost 7000 meters high, such as Kilimanjaro, without any prior experience at high altitudes. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The authors therefore recommend self-assessment of the following type: anyone who can hike for several hours at a normal pace in the Alps at altitudes of 2500 to 3000 meters ought to be able to tolerate similar exercise one altitude level higher while trekking, though perhaps at a somewhat slower pace. (bio-medicine.org)
  • For example, the types of mosquitoes which carry malaria and dengue fever cannot live at altitudes above 2300 meters (according to the US Centers for Disease Control) as is the case in virtually all of the sierras. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the majority of passenger aircraft, the passengers' oxygen masks are activated automatically if the cabin pressure falls below the atmospheric pressure equivalent of 14,000 feet (~4,500 meters). (wikipedia.org)
  • On 28 balloon flights, he measured the temperature, air pressure, humidity and the wind speed up to an altitude of almost 9000 meters. (wikipedia.org)
  • increases
  • As the altitude increases, the percentage of oxygen in the air remains constant but the pressure decreases and the air becomes thinner, making breathing more difficult. (euroclinix.net)
  • The incidence increases with increasing altitude. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • As altitude increases, the available amount of oxygen to sustain mental and physical alertness decreases with the overall air pressure, though the relative percentage of oxygen in air, at about 21%, remains practically unchanged up to 21,000 metres (70,000 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammals will also experience decreases in aerobic metabolism and oxygen demand, along with increases in ATP production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hemoglobin increases the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood by about 40-fold, with the ability of hemoglobin to carry oxygen influenced by the partial pressure of oxygen in the environment, a relationship described in the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute altitude
  • for some otherwise healthy people, acute altitude sickness can begin to appear at around 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) above sea level, such as at many mountain ski resorts, equivalent to a pressure of 80 kilopascals (0.79 atm). (wikipedia.org)
  • suffer
  • As a result, a link was discovered between a low blood oxygen level and reduced systolic function of the right ventricle in those volunteers who went on to suffer AMS. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • exposure
  • It is more likely if you climb quickly, if you exercise vigorously during your first few days of altitude exposure, and if you have been living at low elevation prior to your climb. (drugs.com)
  • partial
  • At all cruising altitudes of jet aircraft, the partial pressure of oxygen in a wheel well is below that required to support brain consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a direct result of the decrease in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood, and leads to increased ventilation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process is induced by a decrease in oxygen partial pressure in blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, lower oxygen partial pressure induces post-transcriptional modification of HIF-1α, allowing HIF-1α to dimerize with HIF-1β to form HIF-1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxygen diffuses from the breathed air, mixed with water vapour, to arterial blood, where its partial pressure is around 100 mmHg (13.3 kPa). (wikipedia.org)
  • The binding capacity of hemoglobin is influenced by the partial pressure of oxygen in the environment, as described in the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Experimentally, oxygen diffusion becomes rate limiting (and lethal) when arterial oxygen partial pressure falls to 60 mmHg (5.3 kPa) or below. (wikipedia.org)
  • worsen
  • If that's the case, then shuttling the overweight to even a moderate altitude may worsen inflammation and increase their chances of heart attack or other serious problems. (wired.com)
  • ascent
  • On the other hand, a noticeable loss of physical performance ability during the ascent and a dry cough are early manifestations of high-altitude pulmonary edema. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The experts from France and Italy used ultrasound scans of heart activity on a group of volunteers at sea level and repeated the tests after an ascent by cable car to an altitude of 3,842 m (12,605 ft) on Aiguille du Midi in the French Alps. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Decompression (altitude) refers to the reduction in ambient pressure due to ascent above sea level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary
  • Mammals that rely on pulmonary ventilation will increase their ventilation to account for the lack of oxygen reaching the tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • elevation
  • The average nightly low is -9 °C (15 °F), and the average daily high is 8 °C (46 °F). The 3,600 meter (12,000 feet) elevation and the 8 hours of sunshine a day might make it feel pleasant outside. (chinahighlights.com)
  • A high-altitude weight loss strategy could be viable, though studies have shown peoples' appetites bounce back after about six months at high elevation, Leissner said. (wired.com)
  • This sickness affects close to half of all people who begin near to sea level and climb to 14,000 feet of elevation without scheduling enough rest time. (drugs.com)
  • At least spend a day or (better) two at the altitude of the trailhead before you hike this trail again or, better yet, find another trail with less elevation gain. (backpacking.net)
  • The normal blood-oxygen saturation for high-elevation dwellers is typically 88 to 93 percent. (summitdaily.com)
  • Manali - Rohtang Jot - Gramphu - Kokhsar - Tandi - Keylong - Jispa - Darcha - Zingzingbar - Baralacha La - Bharatpur - Sarchu (state border) - Gata Loops - Nakee La - Lachulung La - Pang - More Plains - Tanglang La - Gya - Upshi - Karu - Leh 1: Manali (altitude 1,950 m (6,400 ft)) to Marhi at 3,300 m (10,800 ft) elevation 33 km (21 mi). (wikipedia.org)
  • Altitude decompression may be a natural consequence of unprotected elevation to altitude, or due to intentional or unintentional release of pressurisation of a pressure suit or pressurised compartment, vehicle or habitat, and may be controlled or uncontrolled. (wikipedia.org)