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  • dose
  • Reproduction studies in rats and rabbits have shown that loperamide administered in doses up to 30 times the human therapeutic dose does not interfere with fertility. (drugs.com)
  • Reproduction studies in rats and rabbits have shown that loperamide administered in doses up to 30 times the human therapeutic dose did not cause harm to the offspring, {05} {36} or produce teratogenic effects. (drugs.com)
  • {14} {25} {29} {30} However, in a pre- and post-natal study, loperamide administered to female nursing rats at a dose of 40 mg per kg of body weight caused a decrease in pup survival. (drugs.com)
  • Do not use more than the recommended dose of loperamide, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. (drugs.com)
  • Consuming a higher dose of loperamide than recommended quantity or when recommended amount of loperamide is taken with other medicines that may interact with it are the main reasons behind serious heart problems. (medindia.net)
  • 16) Depending on the presentation, opioid receptor agonists such as loperamide , antispasmodics such as hyoscine, cimetropium, pinaverium, and antidepressants such as low-dose tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be prescribed. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • acute
  • Other brands of loperamide may also be licensed to treat acute diarrhoea associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults aged 18 years and over, following initial diagnosis by a doctor, or for other uses when prescribed by a doctor. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Loperamide can be bought without a prescription to treat acute (sudden and short-lived) episodes of watery diarrhoea in adults. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Use loperamide with caution in animals with head injuries, lung disease, acute abdominal pain or liver disease with associated neurologic abnormalities. (petplace.com)
  • stool
  • Loperamide is also used to reduce the amount of stool in people who have an ileostomy (re-routing of the bowel through a surgical opening in the stomach). (peacehealth.org)
  • contractions
  • Loperamide works by slowing the muscular contractions of the intestine and so is called an 'antimotility' medicine. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • By acting on these receptors, loperamide reduces the muscular contractions of the intestine (called peristalsis) that move food and faecal matter through the gut. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • doses
  • Food and Drug Administration has issued warning for Loperamide (Imodium) as higher doses of the drug can cause severe heart problems which may lead to death. (medindia.net)
  • Adverse
  • A review of loperamide in children under 12 years old, and found that serious adverse events occurred only in children under 3 years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • This increased risk of adverse events in the heart after the use of loperamide has made the FDA officials to take necessary safety actions. (medindia.net)
  • decrease
  • Loperamide acts on receptors along the small intestine to decrease circular and longitudinal muscle activity. (drugs.com)
  • Loperamide may help decrease the number of bowel movements but is not recommended in those with severe disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptomatic
  • Loperamide treatment is not used in symptomatic C. difficile infections, as it increases the risk of toxin retention and precipitation of toxic megacolon. (wikipedia.org)
  • side effects
  • Recent studies suggest that loperamide is more effective and has lower neural side effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using loperamide together with scopolamine may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. (drugs.com)
  • While generally safe and effective when prescribed by a veterinarian, loperamide can cause side effects in some animals. (petplace.com)
  • available
  • Loperamide is available without a prescription but should not be administered unless under the supervision and guidance of a veterinarian. (petplace.com)
  • years
  • The use of loperamide in children under 2 years is not recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loperamide is not recommended for use in children up to 6 years of age {04} {05} {25} {29} {30} unless directed by a physician. (drugs.com)
  • Children, especially those under 3 years of age, are more susceptible to the opiate-like effects (CNS effects) of loperamide. (drugs.com)