• gene
  • allele one of multiple alternative forms of a single gene, each of which is a viable DNA sequence occupying a given position, or locus on a chromosome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analysis of monomers from two different CRM1TR loci shows that gene conversion is the major cause of sequence variation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We propose that successive intrastrand deletions generated the initial repeat structure, and gene conversions increased the size of each tandem repeat locus. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These include gene clusters for use of different carbon and nitrogen sources in yeasts, for production of antibiotics, toxins, and virulence determinants in filamentous fungi, for production of defense compounds in plants, and for innate and adaptive immunity in animals (the major histocompatibility locus). (springer.com)
  • Although the lacI repressor gene is able to regulate expression of the lacZYA genes when placed anywhere in the chromosome, this gene is normally positioned immediately upstream of lacZYA . (springer.com)
  • If an individual presents only the hereditary characteristics determined by one gene of the pair on an autosomal chromosome, that gene is called dominant . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of the 45S rRNA gene was sequenced for micro B, large B, and A chromosomes of B. dichromosomatica cytodeme A2, and conserved differences were identified between sequences originating from A and both types of B chromosomes. (jove.com)
  • plasmids
  • Although his hypothesis turned out to be wrong, Mojica surmised at the time that the clustered repeats had a role in correctly segregating replicated DNA into daughter cells during cell division because plasmids and chromosomes with identical repeat arrays could not coexist in Haloferax volcanii. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extrachromosomal genetic elements such as plasmids and bacteriophages are nonessential replicons which often determine resistance to antimicrobial agents, production of virulence factors, or other functions. (nih.gov)
  • mitosis
  • Two outstanding and interrelated aspects of this phenomenon are how the presence of PSR leads to blockage of normal chromosome resolution during the first mitosis, and how PSR excludes itself from elimination. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • mutant
  • The impaired regulatory ability of TP5 persists for at least several generations after TP5 X chromosomes extracted from a long-term mutant Su(var)205 stock are made homozygous in the absence of the Su(var)205 mutation. (genetics.org)
  • ratio
  • A non-essential, selfish B chromosome known as Paternal Sex Ratio (PSR) induces complete elimination of the sperm-derived hereditary material in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis . (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • sequence
  • Distinct CRM1TR sequence variants occupy the two CRM1TR loci, indicating that there is little or no movement of repeats between loci, even though they are separated by only ~1.4 Mb. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Phylogenetic analysis did not identify a species containing an ITS2 sequence more similar to either of the B chromosome sequences than the B. dichromosomatica A chromosome sequences. (jove.com)
  • structure
  • The Cas proteins showed helicase and nuclease motifs, suggesting a role in the dynamic structure of the CRISPR loci. (wikipedia.org)
  • present
  • One of the most striking examples of intragenomic conflict stems from a non-essential, supernumerary B chromosome known as PSR (for P aternal S ex R atio), which is present in natural populations of the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis 5 , 6 . (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • transmission
  • Cytotype regulation of transposable P elements in the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster is associated with maternal transmission of P elements inserted at the left telomere of the X chromosome. (genetics.org)
  • size
  • The chromosomes of most bacteria, which some authors prefer to call genophores, can range in size from only 130,000 base pairs in the endosymbiotic bacteria Candidatus Hodgkinia cicadicola and Candidatus Tremblaya princeps, to more than 14,000,000 base pairs in the soil-dwelling bacterium Sorangium cellulosum. (wikipedia.org)