• posture
  • Researchers have identified subpopulations of neurons in the spinal cord that help coordinate the movement of the arms and legs to ensure a stable body posture during locomotion. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • CPG within the lumbosacral spinal cord segments represent an important component of the total circuitry that generates and controls posture and locomotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • This spinal circuitry can function independently in the absence of descending input from the brain to generate stable posture and locomotion and even modulate activity to match changing conditions (e.g., stepping over obstacles). (wikipedia.org)
  • Important aspects of legged locomotion are posture (the way the body is supported by the legs), the number of legs, and the functional structure of the leg and foot. (wikipedia.org)
  • Robot
  • Robot locomotion is the collective name for the various methods that robots use to transport themselves from place to place. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autonomous robot locomotion is a major technological obstacle for many areas of robotics, such as humanoids (like Honda's Asimo). (wikipedia.org)
  • Secondly, due to the mechanisms responsible for rectilinear and other forms of serpentine locomotion, the robots tend to have repetitive motor elements, which makes the entire robot relatively robust to mechanical failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • As Capelli points out "it was absolutely fascinating to see how one population of neurons in the brainstem can elicit a full motor program that recruits both fore- and hindlimbs and all the muscles involved in a manner indistinguishable from natural locomotion. (unibas.ch)
  • Rectilinear locomotion relies upon two opposing muscles, the costcutaneous inferior and superior, which are present on every rib and connect the ribs to the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The spinal cord executes rhythmical and sequential activation of muscles in locomotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • A typical characteristic of many animals that utilize undulatory locomotion is that they have segmented muscles, or blocks of myomeres, running from their head to tails which are separated by connective tissue called myosepta. (wikipedia.org)
  • jellyfish
  • There are also many animal species that depend on their environment for transportation, a type of mobility called passive locomotion, e.g., sailing (some jellyfish), kiting (spiders) and rolling (some beetles and spiders). (wikipedia.org)
  • Rectilinear
  • Unlike all other modes of snake locomotion, in which the snake bends its body, in rectilinear locomotion, the snake flexes its body only when turning. (wikipedia.org)
  • The development of rectilinear movement in robotics is centered around the development of snakelike robots, which have significant advantages over robots with wheeled or bipedal locomotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rectilinear locomotion in a snake (Boa occidentalis)" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • In the absence of CPG, control by brain as it happens in complete spinal cord injury, sensory feedback is very important in generating rhythmic locomotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • Humans have long lived in a 1-G environment and have therefore become accustomed to Earth's standard atmospheric conditions, and the microgravity environment of space can have huge effects on the human body and its locomotion (Main article: Space medicine). (wikipedia.org)
  • neurons
  • A clearly defined subpopulation of neurons in the brainstem is essential to execute locomotion at high speeds. (unibas.ch)
  • Paolo Capelli, PhD student in Arber's group and first author of the study, remembers that the most exciting breakthrough of the project was when he started to study the identified neuronal cell types separately: "When we activated neurons releasing the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in one small region of the brainstem called Lateral Paragigantocellular nucleus (LPGi), but not in other neighboring regions, we reliably induced full body locomotion at short latency. (unibas.ch)
  • body
  • Axial locomotion occurs when the animal modifies its body shape to achieve motion. (encyclopedia.com)
  • All forms of body movement including locomotion are controlled at several levels of the nervous system. (unibas.ch)
  • Amiiform locomotion consists of undulations of a long dorsal fin while the body axis is held straight and stable, as seen in the bowfin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spinal locomotion results from intricate dynamic interactions between a central program in lower thoracolumbar spine and proprioceptive feedback from body in the absence of central control by brain as in complete spinal cord injury (SCI). (wikipedia.org)
  • Locomotion in space includes any variety of actions or methods used to move one's body through an environment with microgravity conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • dependent
  • University of Copenhagen researchers have identified two areas of the midbrain that appear to play specific roles in the start, speed and content of dependent selection of locomotion in mice. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • We studied the flow of corticothalamic (CT) information from the motor cortex of the cat during two types of locomotion: visually guided (cortex dependent) and unguided. (jneurosci.org)
  • Methods
  • For many animals, the ability to move is essential for survival and, as a result, natural selection has shaped the locomotion methods and mechanisms used by moving organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • focuses
  • The article focuses on the use of locomotion scoring in the U.S. which Mike Hutjens, extension dairy nutritionist at the University of Illinois, regard it as an efficient way of managing lameness in cows. (ebscohost.com)
  • mode
  • Chance SS, Gaunet F, Beall AC, Loomis JM (1998) Locomotion mode affects the updating of objects encountered during travel: the contribution of vestibular and proprioceptive inputs to path integration. (springer.com)
  • however
  • The network officially ceased to exist at 11:00 a.m. of July 31 of the same year (however, the broadcast of Locomotion stopped on the night of July 30 and was replaced by a countdown clock). (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • It is important to note that inputs from the hip appear to play a critical role in spinal locomotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the first game of the 2007 Season, the Locomotion also lost Jeff Ellis, an important member of the team performing many managerial functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Morphology is therefore important for efficient locomotion, which is in most cases essential for basic functions such as catching prey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type
  • Turns out that one particular nerve cell type in the brainstem helps implement high-speed locomotion. (unibas.ch)
  • A research team led by Silvia Arber, professor at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and a Senior Group Leader at the FMI, now shows that one particular nerve cell type in the brainstem is essential to implement high-speed locomotion. (unibas.ch)
  • experimental
  • We hope that this review will give them a feeling for the possible experimental approaches that can be used to answer questions about leukocyte locomotion. (springer.com)
  • Locomotion was also dedicated to showing works of experimental animation from all over the world throughout the day on-air and online. (wikipedia.org)
  • itself
  • The reasons for this are partly historical, partly that more people have been interested in the way that chemical substances modify leukocyte locomotion than in the locomotion itself, and the direct approach has not always been the most helpful for answering questions about such modifications. (springer.com)
  • analysis
  • Allan, R. B., and Wilkinson, P. C. (1978) A visual analysis of chemotactic and chemokinetic locomotion of human neutrophil leucocytes. (springer.com)
  • Iwasaki, T. "Modeling, analysis, and synthesis of serpentine locomotion with a multilink robotic snake" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)