• enzymes
  • Other lipase enzymes, such as pancreatic lipases, are secreted into extracellular spaces where they serve to process dietary lipids into more simple forms that can be more easily absorbed and transported throughout the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, a biotechnology company has brought recombinant lipase enzymes to market for use in applications such as baking, laundry detergents and even as biocatalysts in alternative energy strategies to convert vegetable oil into fuel. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the primary lipase enzyme that hydrolyzes (breaks down) dietary fat molecules in the human digestive system, it is one of the main digestive enzymes, converting triglyceride substrates found in ingested oils to monoglycerides and free fatty acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike some pancreatic enzymes that are activated by proteolytic cleavage (e.g., trypsinogen), pancreatic lipase is secreted in its final form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein
  • Consistently annotated aligned sequences and superimposed structures of microbial lipases help to understand the functional role of individual amino acids and thus the LED is a useful tool for protein engineering. (bio.net)
  • We have also set up a mailing list as a forum for discussions and announcements on topics related to protein engineering of lipases. (bio.net)
  • Recently, PLC-L2, a PLC-like protein that lacks lipase activity, has been identified in skeletal muscle, as well as in B and T lymphocytes. (sciencemag.org)
  • This protein belongs to the pancreatic lipase family. (wikipedia.org)
  • lipid
  • Most lipases act at a specific position on the glycerol backbone of a lipid substrate (A1, A2 or A3)(small intestine). (wikipedia.org)
  • lipids
  • However, lipases are also being exploited as cheap and versatile catalysts to degrade lipids in more modern applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • fatty acids
  • b) less than 50% by weight of said perfume being esters derived from fatty acids with 1-7 carbon atoms, said mixture including components (a) and (b) functioning to avoid malodor in lipase-treated laundry. (google.es)
  • In enzymology, an acylglycerol lipase (EC 3.1.1.23) is an enzyme that catalyzes a chemical reaction that uses water molecules to break the glycerol monoesters of long-chain fatty acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • lingual lipase
  • However, due to the unique characteristics of lingual lipase, including a pH optimum 4.5-5.4 and its ability to catalyze reactions without bile salts, the lipolytic activity continues through to the stomach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Enzyme release is signaled by autonomic nervous system after ingestion, at which time the serous glands under the circumvallate and foliate lingual papillae on the surface of the tongue secrete lingual lipase to the grooves of the circumvallate and foliate papillae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lingual lipase uses a catalytic triad consisting of aspartic acid-203 (Asp), histidine-257 (His), and serine-144 (Ser), to initiate the hydrolysis of a triglyceride into a diacylglyceride and a free fatty acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have shown that even in these cases, lingual lipase is present in normal amounts, and contributes to greater than 90% of total lipase activity in duodenum. (wikipedia.org)
  • This can be attributed to the fact that lingual lipase has a low pH optimum and can thus remain active through the stomach into the duodenum, where there is a low pH in patients with CF. It has, thus, been proposed that a possible treatment option for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency would be enzyme replacement therapy using lingual lipase, increasing the amount of dietary fat absorption and decreasing the risk of malnutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The proposed mechanism of lingual lipase preferentially cleaving short and medium chain triacylglycerols provides a means for absorption without the need for micelle formation and chylomicrons. (wikipedia.org)
  • This fact, in combination with the bile salt deficiency and low pH throughout the gastrointestinal tract of the neonate, demands that lingual lipase be the main enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of dietary fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • Salacia reticulata and its Polyphenolic Constituents with Lipase Inhibitory and Lipolytic Activities Have Mild Antiobesity Effects in Rats," Journal of Nutrition, 2002, vol. 132, pp. 1819-1824. (patentgenius.com)
  • inhibitors
  • Lipase inhibitors are substances used to reduce the activity of lipases found in the intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lipase inhibitors may affect the amount of fat absorbed, yet they do not block the absorption of a particular type of fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Likewise, lipase inhibitors are not absorbed into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lipase inhibitors covalently bond to the active serine site on lipases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have shown that lipase inhibitors work optimally when 40% of an individual's daily caloric intake is obtained from fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lipase inhibitors can be found naturally in plants and can also be produced as Drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lipase inhibitors can cause side effects, including oily spotting, fecal incontinence, flatus with discharge and abdominal cramping. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since lipase inhibitors are not absorbed in the intestine, and consequently not circulating in the blood, information about alternative side effects such as the modulation[clarification needed] of the gastrointestinal tract is unobtainable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discovery and development of gastrointestinal lipase inhibitors Aronne, Louis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lipase inhibitors have a role to be used as a remedy for obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant-based lipase inhibitors hold great hope to fulfill the need . (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme activity
  • 3. Laundry detergent according to claim 1 wherein the lipase content is such as to produce a lipolytic enzyme activity of at least 100 LU/g. (google.es)
  • High enzyme activity lipase can replace traditional catalyst in processing biodiesel, as this enzyme replaces chemicals in a process which is otherwise highly energy intensive, and can be more environmentally friendly and safe. (wikipedia.org)
  • serine
  • Sequences of 92 microbial lipases and homologous serine hydrolases were assigned to 32 homologous families and 15 superfamilies. (bio.net)
  • acute pancreatitis
  • The blood test for lipase is most often used, along with an amylase test , to help diagnose and monitor acute pancreatitis. (labcorp.com)
  • In acute pancreatitis, lipase levels are frequently very high, often 5 to 10 times higher than the highest reference value (often called the upper limit of normal). (labcorp.com)
  • When acute pancreatitis occurs, lipase levels usually rise in about the same time as blood amylase concentrations , about 4-8 hours, but lipase levels will remain elevated longer than amylase levels. (labcorp.com)
  • Lipase testing is thought to be more reliable than amylase testing for the initial diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and is also more sensitive to detecting acute pancreatitis caused by alcohol consumption. (labcorp.com)
  • Thus, through measurement of serum concentration of pancreatic lipase, acute pancreatitis can be diagnosed. (wikipedia.org)
  • duodenum
  • Triacylglycerol + 2 H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } 2-monoacylglycerol + 2 fatty acid anions Bile salts secreted from the liver and stored in gallbladder are released into the duodenum, where they coat and emulsify large fat droplets into smaller droplets, thus increasing the overall surface area of the fat, which allows the lipase to break apart the fat more effectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • absorption
  • Fungi and bacteria may secrete lipases to facilitate nutrient absorption from the external medium (or in examples of pathogenic microbes, to promote invasion of a new host). (wikipedia.org)
  • recombinant
  • A prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover study comparing rhBSSL (recombinant human Bile Salt Stimulated Lipase) and placebo added to infant formula during one week of treatment in preterm infants born before 32 weeks of gestational age. (wikipedia.org)