• spinal canal
  • Entrapment of the cauda equina roots by hypertrophy of the osseous and soft tissue structures surrounding the lumbar spinal canal is often associated with incapacitating pain in the back and lower extremities, difficulty ambulating, leg paresthesias and weakness and, in severe cases, bowel or bladder disturbances. (aafp.org)
  • As shown in Figures 1 and 2 , entrapment of the cauda equina roots, which pass within the dural sac, can occur as a result of progressive hypertrophy of any of the osseocartilaginous and ligamentous elements surrounding the spinal canal. (aafp.org)
  • urinary
  • In spite of the serious consequences of such lesions on urinary, anorectal, and sexual function, and their potential to cause chronic pain syndromes, data obtained in systematically studied populations of these patients are still inadequate. (bmj.com)
  • inflammatory
  • Other much rarer conditions (ischaemic insults, inflammatory, infectious, and toxic conditions) may also be responsible for cauda equina damage. (bmj.com)
  • include
  • Most common causes include iatrogenic lumbar punctures, burst fractures resulting in posterior migration of fragments of the vertebral body, severe disc herniations, spinal anaesthesia involving trauma from catheters and high local anaesthetic concentrations around the cauda equina, penetrating trauma such as knife wounds or ballistic trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • function
  • To investigate the effects of cauda equina lesions on sexual function in men. (bmj.com)
  • These changes translate into loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the spinal cord below the level of the lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with lesions at the L4 to S2 who are complete paraplegics may have motor function issues in their gluts and hamstrings. (wikipedia.org)