• anxiety
  • A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a study published in the May 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology┬«, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (blogspot.com)
  • Of the women taking pregabalin, 115 were taking it to treat neuropathic pain, 39 were taking it for psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and psychosis, five were taking it for epilepsy and one was taking it for restless leg syndrome. (blogspot.com)
  • pregnancy
  • For the study, information was collected in seven countries from 164 women who took pregabalin during a pregnancy and 656 pregnant women who were not taking any anti-seizure drugs. (blogspot.com)
  • The women taking pregabalin were six times more likely to have a pregnancy with a major defect in the central nervous system than women who were not taking the drug, with four CNS defects out of 125 pregnancies, or 3.2 percent, compared to three CNS defects out of 570 pregnancies, or 0.5 percent. (blogspot.com)
  • For women, a major reason for exclusion is the possibility of pregnancy and the unknown risks to the fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • For example, a risk-averse investor might choose to put his or her money into a bank account with a low but guaranteed interest rate, rather than into a stock that may have high expected returns, but also involves a chance of losing value. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person is said to be: risk-averse (or risk-avoiding) - if he or she would accept a certain payment (certainty equivalent) of less than $50 (for example, $40), rather than taking the gamble and possibly receiving nothing. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk-loving (or risk-seeking) - if he or she would accept the bet even when the guaranteed payment is more than $50 (for example, $60). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example: people believing that they are less at risk of being a crime victim, smokers believing that they are less likely to contract lung cancer or disease than other smokers, first-time bungee jumpers believing that they are less at risk of an injury than other jumpers, or traders who think they are less exposed to losses in the markets. (wikipedia.org)
  • issue
  • However, the global economic turbulence of 2009-2010 and the subsequent economic fragility and uncertainty enveloping much of the global economy, has begun to underscore how broad this issue really is. (voxeu.org)
  • In a recent special issue of the Journal of Asian Business , co-published by the University of Michigan's Center for International Business Education and Research (CBER) and the Asian Institute of Management Policy Center, we tried to shed light on some of the main channels through which the process of global rebalancing is possibly taking shape. (voxeu.org)
  • drugs
  • Seven of the 116 pregnancies in women taking anti-seizure drugs, or 6 percent, had major birth defects, compared to 12 of 580 pregnancies, or 2 percent, in women who did not take the drug. (blogspot.com)
  • play
  • Hardly household names when it comes to health, but some scientists believe these antioxidants can play a vital role in fighting aging and its associated diseases. (scoop.it)
  • As parts of the industrialised north ages and enters a period of economic fragility, some parts of the emerging south could play a role in global rebalancing. (voxeu.org)
  • individual
  • The expected payoff for both scenarios is $50, meaning that an individual who was insensitive to risk would not care whether they took the guaranteed payment or the gamble. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dollar amount that the individual would accept instead of the bet is called the certainty equivalent, and the difference between the expected value and the certainty equivalent is called the risk premium. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the case of a wealthier individual, the risk of losing $100 would be less significant, and for such small amounts his utility function would be likely to be almost linear, for instance if u(0) = 0 and u(100) = 10, then u(40) might be 4.0001 and u(50) might be 5.0001. (wikipedia.org)
  • After obtaining scores, researchers are able to use the information to determine if there is a difference in the average risk estimate of the individual compared to the average risk estimate of their peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • person
  • This risk premium means that the person would be willing to sacrifice as much as $10 in expected value in order to achieve perfect certainty about how much money will be received. (wikipedia.org)
  • Optimism bias (also known as unrealistic or comparative optimism) is a cognitive bias that causes a person to believe that they are at a lesser risk of experiencing a negative event compared to others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Problems can occur when trying to measure absolute risk because it is extremely difficult to determine the actual risk statistic for a person. (wikipedia.org)
  • negative
  • For risk-averse individuals, it is positive, for risk-neutral persons it is zero, and for risk-loving individuals their risk premium is negative. (wikipedia.org)
  • Optimism bias is typically measured through two determinants of risk: absolute risk, where individuals are asked to estimate their likelihood of experiencing a negative event compared to their actual chance of experiencing a negative event (comparison against self), and comparative risk, where individuals are asked to estimate the likelihood of experiencing a negative event (their personal risk estimate) compared to others of the same age and sex (a target risk estimate). (wikipedia.org)
  • less
  • Direct comparisons ask whether an individual's own risk of experiencing an event is less than, greater than, or equal to someone else's risk, while indirect comparisons ask individuals to provide separate estimates of their own risk of experiencing an event and other's risk of experiencing the same event. (wikipedia.org)
  • People tend to view their risks as less than others because they believe that this is what other people want to see. (wikipedia.org)