• Humans
  • As compared to inhalation, intratracheal instillation allows greater control over the dose and location of the substance, is cheaper and less technically demanding, allows lower amounts of scarce or expensive substances to be used, allows substances to be tested that can be inhaled by humans but not small mammals, and minimizes exposure to laboratory workers and to the skin of laboratory animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • procedure
  • Intratracheal instillation is often performed with mice, rats, or hamsters, with hamsters often preferred because their mouth can be opened widely to aid viewing the procedure, and because they are more resistant to lung diseases than rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • It can also be associated with potentially fatal complications such as pulmonary aspiration of stomach contents which can result in a severe and sometimes fatal chemical aspiration pneumonitis, or unrecognized intubation of the esophagus which can lead to potentially fatal anoxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • ventilation
  • The number of attempts required for successful tube positioning, the volume of air needed for blocker cuff inflation, and intubation times were recorded, as were the times for single-lung ventilation and the potential for bronchial injury. (biomedsearch.com)
  • emergency
  • Reid C, Chan L, Tweeddale M (2004) The who, where, and what of rapid sequence intubation: prospective observational study of emergency RSI outside the operating theatre. (springer.com)