• retinal
  • Visual dysfunction in AD patients, traditionally attributed to well-documented cerebral pathology, can now be reexamined as a direct outcome of retinal abnormalities. (springer.com)
  • However, there is increasing evidence that dolichocephalic breeds, thanks to a higher number of retinal ganglion cells in their "visual streak", retain more heightened sensitivity than other breeds to objects and rapid movement in the horizontal field of vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • Along with a comprehensive eye health evaluation looking for any visual health compromise (dry eye, glaucoma, cataracts, retinal health, optic nerve evaluation) the doctor will test the visual field, looking for compromise due to the area possibly affected by the ABI. (indepthvision.com)
  • stimuli
  • This means that most infants will look longer at patterned visual stimuli instead of a plain, pattern-less stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • When examining an infants preferred visual stimuli, it was found that one-month-old infants often gazed mostly at prominent, sharp features of an object - whether it is a strong defined curve or an edge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, infants starting from one month of age have been found to prefer visual stimuli that are in motion rather than stationary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead, my prescription is a compromise between the two, with my brain asked to synthesize the visual stimuli and make sense of it. (woychickdesign.com)
  • rays
  • Equal to the reciprocal of the focal length of a lens (in meters), e.g., a 2-diopter lens brings parallel rays of light to a focus at half a meter. (consumersresearchcncl.org)
  • It works by reflectively or refractively manipulating bundles of light rays, whereas Gabor-style holography works by diffractively reconstructing wavefronts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because light is an electromagnetic wave, other forms of electromagnetic radiation such as X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves exhibit similar properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common of these, geometric optics, treats light as a collection of rays that travel in straight lines and bend when they pass through or reflect from surfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plato first articulated the emission theory, the idea that visual perception is accomplished by rays emitted by the eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ptolemy, in his treatise Optics, held an extramission-intromission theory of vision: the rays (or flux) from the eye formed a cone, the vertex being within the eye, and the base defining the visual field. (wikipedia.org)
  • refraction
  • He based his work on Plato's emission theory wherein he described the mathematical rules of perspective and described the effects of refraction qualitatively, although he questioned that a beam of light from the eye could instantaneously light up the stars every time someone blinked. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 11th century, Alhazen (Ibn al-Haytham) wrote the Book of Optics (Kitab al-manazir) in which he explored reflection and refraction and proposed a new system for explaining vision and light based on observation and experiment. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • You may be concerned that their physical symptoms are caused by an illness, injury, food sensitivity, or environmental factors, but what you may not know is some common childhood physical complaints could be caused by an undetected vision problem that is treatable with vision therapy . (visuallearningcenter.com)
  • spatial
  • A light stabilizing interface operatively linked to a collection wave guides for combining and stabilizing reflected light into a substantially even spatial distribution of light energy with a substantially uniform light intensity. (google.com)
  • The stabilization and substantially even spatial distribution of reflected light can be accomplished by mixing and transmitting device in the form of a single optical fiber and optical junction wave guides in the form of optical fibers having a smaller diameter relative to the mixing and transmitting device. (google.com)
  • The stabilization and substantially even spatial distribution of reflected light also can be accomplished by a single, integral device that includes a collection wave guide matching section and a transition region. (google.com)
  • typically
  • Light typically passes through multiple layers and is reflected more than once. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, the sensor is an image sensor in a camera sensitive to visible light and the input to the method is a set of digital images (one, two or more) or video. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, a hologram is a photographic recording of a light field, rather than of an image formed by a lens, and it is used to display a fully three-dimensional image of the holographed subject, which is seen without the aid of special glasses or other intermediate optics. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • Automatic rescaling of sensitivity of the masking field as the overall size of an input pattern changes, allows stronger activation of a code for the whole F 1 pattern than for its salient parts. (google.com)
  • problems with seeing certain parts of the visual field should be addressed. (indepthvision.com)
  • Training eye movements and attention into the affected side of the visual field is an important element of rehabilitation and coping. (indepthvision.com)
  • It is an encoding of the light field as an interference pattern of seemingly random variations in the opacity, density, or surface profile of the photographic medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • injury
  • Often, visual problems resulting from Acquired Brain Injury are overlooked during the initial treatment of the injury. (indepthvision.com)
  • Because there is a close relationship between vision and the brain, Acquired Brain Injury can disrupt the visual process, interfering with the flow and processing of all information. (indepthvision.com)
  • crystalline
  • iridophores (reflective/iridescent): sometimes called "guanophores", reflect light using plates of crystalline chemochromes made from guanine leucophores (reflective white): found in some fish, utilize crystalline purines (often guanine) to produce a reflective, shiny, white colour. (wikipedia.org)
  • An opacity or loss of transparency of the crystalline lens which results in loss of light transmission, image degradation and reduced vision. (consumersresearchcncl.org)
  • lasers
  • Examples range from moving light sources, colored visible light, time-of-flight lasers to microwaves or ultrasound. (wikipedia.org)
  • A later refinement, the "rainbow transmission" hologram, allows more convenient illumination by white light rather than by lasers. (wikipedia.org)
  • perceive
  • What we perceive as "colour" are the wavelengths of light that are not absorbed by the pigment, but instead are reflected. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • By providing a better understanding of the visual system, future medical treatments for infant and pediatric ophthalmology can be established. (wikipedia.org)
  • The visual system at birth is functional but very limited. (aafp.org)
  • The visual system develops at a slower rate after six months of age. (aafp.org)
  • but if children are looking at screens throughout the day at school and home, their eyes will become tired and their visual processing system can become fatigued. (visuallearningcenter.com)
  • Reading, writing, and school performance becomes even more challenging because the child has had little time to rest their strained visual system. (visuallearningcenter.com)
  • The doctor will also determine the best prescribed type of lenses for that particular patient based on the overall visual and vestibular system, and the patient's needs. (indepthvision.com)
  • The method and system for stabilizing reflected light can also enhance the drug development process by providing real-time in-vivo chemical analysis of the interactions between drugs and living tissue. (google.com)
  • 2. The system of claim 1 , further comprising a plurality of optical connection wave guides disposed between said light stabilizing interface and the light processing unit. (google.com)
  • 4. The system of claim 1 , wherein said light stabilizing interface includes a shaped end which is operatively linked to said light processing unit. (google.com)
  • 5. The system of claim 4 , wherein the shaped end of the light stabilizing interface has a polygonal shape. (google.com)
  • 6. The system of claim 5 , wherein the shaped end of the light stabilizing interface is substantially rectilinear. (google.com)
  • 7. The system of claim 1 , wherein the light processing unit is an instrument that disperses the light energy. (google.com)
  • 8. The system of claim 1 , wherein the light processing unit includes a wavelength separator unit. (google.com)
  • 9. The system of claim 8 , wherein the light processing unit is a spectrograph. (google.com)
  • 12. The system of claim 1 , wherein the light stabilizing interface comprises a single optical wave guide. (google.com)
  • development
  • Normal visual development is rapid during the first six months of life and continues through the first decade. (aafp.org)
  • Young children are uniquely sensitive to conditions that interfere with vision and visual development. (aafp.org)
  • Myelination continues to increase in the central visual pathways until about four years of age, and development of the visual cortex continues throughout the first decade of life. (aafp.org)
  • Instead, the vision loss results from altered visual development within the central visual pathways. (aafp.org)
  • These practical developments were followed by the development of theories of light and vision by ancient Greek and Indian philosophers, and the development of geometrical optics in the Greco-Roman world. (wikipedia.org)
  • image
  • Shape-from-shading Due to the analysis of the shade information in the image, by using Lambertian reflectance, the depth of normal information of the object surface is restored to reconstruct. (wikipedia.org)
  • It describes mental processes as computational operations, so that, for example, a fear response is described as arising from a neurological computation that inputs the perceptional data, e.g. a visual image of a spider, and outputs the appropriate reaction, e.g. fear of possibly dangerous animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hologram itself is not an image and it is usually unintelligible when viewed under diffuse ambient light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transmission holograms, such as those produced by Leith and Upatnieks, are viewed by shining laser light through them and looking at the reconstructed image from the side of the hologram opposite the source. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • These patients can often regain this mismatch of perception with certain types of prism systems incorporated into their prescription lenses. (indepthvision.com)
  • Complete electromagnetic descriptions of light are, however, often difficult to apply in practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • interference
  • Physical optics is a more comprehensive model of light, which includes wave effects such as diffraction and interference that cannot be accounted for in geometric optics. (wikipedia.org)
  • early childhood
  • Since many affected children are asymptomatic, early detection of abnormal visual function requires effective screening throughout early childhood. (aafp.org)
  • physical
  • Participants reported visual hallucinations, less auditory hallucinations and specific physical sensation progressing to a sense of bodily dissociation, as well as experiences of euphoria, calm, fear, and anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • rehabilitation
  • Very few in the health care professions, including head trauma rehabilitation centers, are adequately aware of the visual problems resulting from ABI and the visual-perceptual consequences. (indepthvision.com)
  • eyes
  • Doing the session opened my eyes … to the amount or the lack of things this patient was doing … which gave you insight into what they thought and their perceptions were … and their perception was quite different to what I thought it would be. (sykpathway.com)
  • distance
  • A simple example of a mechanical method would use a depth gauge to measure a distance to a rotating object put on a turntable. (wikipedia.org)
  • object
  • Active methods, i.e. range data methods, given the depth map, reconstruct the 3D profile by numerical approximation approach and build the object in scenario based on model. (wikipedia.org)
  • These methods actively interfere with the reconstructed object, either mechanically or radiometrically using rangefinders, in order to acquire the depth map, e.g. structured light, laser range finder and other active sensing techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • Distortion and perspective measured in 2D images provide the hint for inversely solving depth of normal information of the object surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • size
  • That size is specified as a visual angle, which is the angle, at the eye, under which the optotype appears. (wikipedia.org)
  • requires
  • In its pure form, holography requires the use of laser light for illuminating the subject and for viewing the finished hologram. (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • Another kind of common hologram, the reflection or Denisyuk hologram, can also be viewed using a white-light illumination source on the same side of the hologram as the viewer and is the type of hologram normally seen in holographic displays. (wikipedia.org)