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  • late
  • the term was later changed to late deceleration by other researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies in the biodemography of human longevity indicate a late-life mortality deceleration law: that death rates level off at advanced ages to a late-life mortality plateau. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is also sometimes used to designate late decelerations of fetal heart rate as measured by electronic monitoring, even if there is no other evidence of reduced blood flow to the placenta, normal uterine blood flow rate being 600mL/min. (wikipedia.org)
  • head
  • A biomechanical analysis published in 2005 reported that "forceful shaking can severely injure or kill an infant, this is because the cervical spine would be severely injured and not because subdural hematomas would be caused by high head rotational accelerations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Glut1 deficiency is characterized by an array of signs and symptoms including deceleration of head growth also known as microcephaly, mental and motor developmental delays, infantile seizures refractory to anticonvulsants, ataxia, dystonia, dysarthria, opsoclonus, spasticity, and other paroxysmal neurologic phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • Interpretation of a CTG tracing requires both qualitative and quantitative description of: Uterine activity (contractions) Baseline fetal heart rate (FHR) Baseline FHR variability Presence of accelerations Periodic or episodic decelerations Changes or trends of FHR patterns over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • child
  • Mothers of infants with this disorder usually have uneventful pregnancies and deliveries, with the child appearing normal and within typical birth weight and length ranges. (wikipedia.org)
  • A child safety seat (infant safety seat, child restraint system, child seat, baby seat, restraining car seat, car seat, etc.) is a seat designed specifically to protect children from injury or death during vehicle collisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore
  • Infant preferences suggest that perceptual correspondences between music and movement, at least for beat perception, are predisposed and therefore likely universal. (pnas.org)
  • head
  • Glut1 deficiency is characterized by an array of signs and symptoms including deceleration of head growth also known as microcephaly, mental and motor developmental delays, infantile seizures refractory to anticonvulsants, ataxia, dystonia, dysarthria, opsoclonus, spasticity, and other paroxysmal neurologic phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infants with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome have a normal head size at birth, but the growth of the brain and skull is slow, in severe cases resulting in an abnormally small head size. (wikipedia.org)
  • pattern
  • In one study, 7-mo-old infants were bounced in duple or triple meter while listening to an ambiguous rhythm pattern ( 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • When hearing the same pattern later without movement, infants preferred the pattern with intensity (auditory) accents that matched the particular metric pattern at which they were previously bounced. (pnas.org)
  • child
  • There is also the extremely rare and poorly understood "Syndrome X," whereby a person remains physically and mentally an infant or child throughout one's life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mothers of infants with this disorder usually have uneventful pregnancies and deliveries, with the child appearing normal and within typical birth weight and length ranges. (wikipedia.org)
  • A child safety seat (infant safety seat, child restraint system, child seat, baby seat, restraining car seat, car seat, etc.) is a seat designed specifically to protect children from injury or death during vehicle collisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • It is now well established that very young infants-even neonates ( 3 )-are predisposed to group metrically regular, auditory events similarly to adults ( 4 , 5 ). (pnas.org)
  • delivery
  • She was not admitted to hospital until she developed EPH gestosis in the 27th week of gestation, which had an unfavourable outcome for the infant who died nine days after delivery. (lookfordiagnosis.com)