• system
  • Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal vasoactive substance of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), having a variety of physiological actions including vasoconstriction, aldosterone release, and cell growth. (ahajournals.org)
  • Comprehensive characterization and quantification of blood flow is essential for understanding the function of the cardiovascular system under normal and diseased conditions. (wisc.edu)
  • These are cell atrophy, impaired metabolism (increased catabolism), reduction of the defense capacity of the organism, reducing healing processes and regeneration, degeneration of the nervous system. (erank.tv)
  • The picture is however blurred in the presence of anaesthesia where both the concentration and type of anaesthetics can result in different effects on the cardiovascular system. (hindawi.com)
  • In addition to CNS effects GABAergic neurons also have a significant impact on the cardiovascular system. (hindawi.com)
  • This fiber is converted into gel molecules that carry excess cholesterol present in the cardiovascular system. (rahana.org)
  • It is essential for cardiovascular function, and development and function of skeletal muscle, the retina, and the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In early tests in 1978, Schauss observed that color, surprisingly, did affect muscle strength, either invigorating or enervating the subject, and even influenced the cardiovascular system. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanism
  • In a recent article, Carter and Nguyen identify several genetic disorders, arguing that far from being a rare phenomenon, antagonistic pleiotropy might be a fundamental mechanism for the survival of these non-optimal alleles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Circulation
  • cAMP goes on to inhibit any undue platelet activation (in order to promote circulation) and also counteracts any increase in cytosolic calcium levels that would result from thromboxane A2 (TXA2) binding (leading to platelet activation and subsequent coagulation). (wikipedia.org)
  • adaptation
  • Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), also known as intermittent hypoxic therapy, is a non-invasive, drug-free technique aimed at improving human performance and well-being by way of adaptation to reduced oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • and -λογία, -logia), environmental physiology or physiological ecology is a biological discipline that studies the adaptation of an organism's physiology to environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • The ob/ob mouse may, therefore, be an excellent new model for the study of the cardiovascular effects of obesity. (physiology.org)
  • The majority of well-known Ang II actions are mediated via AT 1 receptor stimulation, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and AT 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have been widely used as antihypertensive drugs, with the expectation of cardiovascular protective effects. (ahajournals.org)
  • In conclusion, the impact of changes in GABAergic input is very difficult to predict in these settings, emphasizing the need for experiments performed in conscious animals when aiming at determining the cardiovascular effects of compounds acting on GABAergic neurons. (hindawi.com)
  • Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. (ahajournals.org)
  • The phenomenon of IHT is that it delivers a non-damaging training stimulus that naturally triggers a cascade of beneficial adaptive responses without adverse effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • These protect them from the damaging effects of ice formation and falling rates of enzyme catalysis at low temperatures, and from enzyme denaturation and increased photorespiration at high temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • mortality
  • Although overall life expectancy has improved, people with Down syndrome have even greater mortality at any age, compared with age-matched sample from the general population or compared with individuals with intellectual disabilities due to causes other than Down syndrome. (erank.tv)
  • thus
  • Increased vagal tone (and thus vagal action) is associated with a diminished and more variable heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • This increased pressure inhibits venous return to the heart and thus less atrial expansion and activation of baroreceptors occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The low pKa of taurine's sulfonic acid group ensures this moiety is negatively charged in the pH ranges normally found in the intestinal tract, thus it improves the surfactant properties of the cholic acid conjugate. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane
  • Taurine crosses the blood-brain barrier and has been implicated in a wide array of physiological phenomena including inhibitory neurotransmission, long-term potentiation in the striatum/hippocampus, membrane stabilization,[unreliable medical source? (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, PC made via PEMT plays a wide range of physiological roles, utilized in choline synthesis, hepatocyte membrane structure, bile secretion, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolism
  • Leptin, a neuroendocrine hormone released by adipose tissue, is important in modulating obesity by signaling satiety and increasing metabolism. (physiology.org)
  • changes
  • The biological changes that occur with increasing age play a key role in the quality of physical - motor performance. (erank.tv)
  • However
  • However, a number of physiological and technical issues can affect the accuracy of the results and appropriate guidelines for the technique have been published. (jove.com)
  • health
  • This work was primarily supported by a Marriott Foundation Cardiovascular Fellowship (CME), National Institutes of Health R01 DK082507 (CME), as well as Georgetown University Department of Medicine internal funding. (physiology.org)
  • endothelial
  • Since PGI2 is primarily produced in a nucleated endothelial cell, the COX inhibition by NSAID can be overcome with time by increased COX gene activation and subsequent production of more COX enzymes to catalyze the formation of PGI2. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Pleiotropy is the phenomenon where one gene controls for more than one phenotypic trait in an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The theme of G.C. William's idea about antagonistic pleiotropy was that if a gene caused both increased reproduction in early life and aging in later life, then senescence would be adaptive in evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • These patients also show a remarkable increase in lateralization towards the right hemisphere of both emotionally and non-emotional prosody rich speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage to the left hemisphere in patients results in a marked increase in depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • With age, the amount of people with Down syndrome is reduced, hypotonia is improving, muscular body mass is reduced and there is increased fat storage. (erank.tv)
  • estrogen
  • Ablation of the estrogen binding site in the PEMT promoter region may increase risk of hepatic steatosis from choline deficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • long-term
  • This finding raises concerns about whether or not long‐term benefits of anti‐TGF β therapeutics improve the durability of medically reopened arteries. (physiology.org)