• understood
  • This perennial concern is especially prominent in modern political liberalism, wherein health has been understood as the foundational good necessary for public life. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 170 drugs used by the Indians of British North America, and perhaps 50 used by the indigenous people of the Caribbean, Mexico, Central and South America" became important enough in the U.S. (as the practitioners of chemistry and pharmacy eventually catalogued, analyzed and understood them) to merit listing in the United States Pharmacopoeia (est. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • Engaging and reader friendly, Fundamentals of Sport Management addresses the foundations of the field for students and professionals. (humankinetics.com)
  • An excellent reference for students or professionals, Fundamentals of Sport Management offers insights into the exciting field, the impact of the sport industry, and the possibilities for employment in sport. (humankinetics.com)
  • The text begins with a discussion of the origins and development of the field, professional associations, essential components of professional preparation, and potential paths to employment. (humankinetics.com)
  • This resource is ideal for those engaging in the field of study for the first time (such as high school and undergraduate students) or those seeking an overview of the career options available in sport management (such as professionals exploring a career change). (humankinetics.com)
  • Dr. Griffith, in his 1997 presidential address to the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) and in his subsequent article, introduced narrative ethics to our field in a manner that brought us in line with mainstream moral philosophy and medical ethics. (jaapl.org)
  • As a systematic field, however, it is a large and relatively new area of study in ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nursing ethics is a branch of applied ethics that concerns itself with activities in the field of nursing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Financial Gerontology is a multidisciplinary field of study encompassing both academic and professional education, that integrates research on aging and human development with the concerns of finance and business. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 1980s Boettner's concerns about personal aging and financial education began to merge with Gregg's views on the need for more comprehensive professional education in the expanding field of financial services. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1935, half of the female foundational members had left the society-a rate similar to that of male members-largely due to the professionalization of the field of linguistics that disproportionately affected women as most worked outside of academia. (wikipedia.org)
  • define
  • We would like readers to focus on both the duties and the moral ideals that ultimately define professional ethics. (jaapl.org)
  • Early work to define ethics in nursing focused more on the virtues that would make a good nurse, which historically included loyalty to the physician, rather than the focus being on nurse's conduct in relation to the person in the nurse's care. (wikipedia.org)
  • organizations
  • The responsibilities of the Secretary-Treasurer were expanded and the LSA established a Secretariat in Washington, DC in order to act as a liaison between the members, federal government, and other professional organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1981, the LSA and 9 other professional organizations founded the Consortium of Social Science Associations in order to advocate for the governmental support of social science research. (wikipedia.org)
  • journalism
  • From 2012 to present Svitlana is in charge of the Center for Ukrainian Reforms and Education (CURE) project, monitoring regional mass media for the presence of so-called "jeans" material (articles with signs of political or commercial commissioning ) and compliance with the professional standards of journalism in Lviv, Donetsk, Kharkiv, Vinnytsia and Sumy regions of Ukraine as well as Crimea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Special consideration is given to journalism that helps a community understand and address important issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Terms like beneficence and non-maleficence are vital to the overall understanding of medical ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Formulations of rulings on bioethical issues in the Islamic context generally arise due to some form of deliberation between medical professionals and religious authority who have been recognized as most qualified individuals of location or time period. (wikipedia.org)
  • National Committees of Medical Ethics/Bioethics have been formed in many Islamic countries which work together with ulema to issue fatwas ensuring that neither the progress of medical science is hindered, nor the Islamic code of bioethics is jeopardized. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Islamic Medical and Scientific Ethics (IMSE) Project is a multinational effort to produce a comprehensive collection of Islamic bioethics resources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although much of nursing ethics can appear similar to medical ethics, there are some factors that differentiate it. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, a concern to promote beneficence may be expressed in traditional medical ethics by the exercise of paternalism, where the health professional makes a decision based upon a perspective of acting in the patient's best interests. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the 2018 creation of the Conscience and Religious Freedom Division of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Reuters reported that "legal and medical ethics experts said that such exemptions [to antidiscrimination law] have legal limits and would be challenged in court. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ethics code of the American Medical Association allows physicians to "refuse to participate in torture, interrogation or forced treatment" but not to deny care based on a patient's "race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other criteria that would constitute invidious discrimination. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • He reveals elements of his personal and private journey and, by doing so, allows us to reflect on the processes by which our own evolving professional identity is tied to our personal narrative. (jaapl.org)
  • Theory
  • In 2014, Bochner published Coming to Narrative: A Personal History of Paradigm Change in the Human Sciences, an autoethnographic story that layers theory and story, weaving his professional and personal life with the social and historical contexts in which they developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethic
  • Despite the move toward more deontological themes by some, there continues to be an interest in virtue ethics in nursing ethics and some support for an ethic of care. (wikipedia.org)
  • understand
  • The series helps students and professionals understand the basic topics, goals, and applications of the many subdisciplines in kinesiology. (humankinetics.com)
  • While we understand and acknowledge that conflicts in roles are central to understanding conflicts of interest, such as the classic problem of being both therapist and forensic expert for the same individual, we hold that to divide professional roles and responsibilities along absolute lines ignores the complexity of the human condition, the hidden dangers of assuming any "pure" forensic role, and the evolving professional identity involved in this work. (jaapl.org)
  • Some understand respect for individual human rights as foundational to democracy and the rule of law, but, at the same time, the First Amendment to the Constitution treats freedom of religion as foundational and prevents the government from making any law "prohibiting the free exercise" of religion. (wikipedia.org)
  • issues
  • The mission of the press-club was uniting the journalists, organizing of meetings and press-conferences on current issues that were important for the public. (wikipedia.org)
  • In her speeches, Svitlana sharply raises the issues of the freedom of speech, proficiency level of journalists, and the necessity of maintaining professional ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • journalist
  • Bell began his professional life as a journalist, being managing editor of The New Leader magazine (1941-1945), labor editor of Fortune (1948-1958) and later co-editor (with his college friend Irving Kristol) of The Public Interest magazine (1965-1973). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1992 Svitlana became a member of the foundational editorial board of the first independent newspaper in the Donetsk region - "Skhidnyi Chasopys" ("The Eastern Journal") in Ukrainian (she was the only professional journalist in the editorial office), founded by the Donetsk district Society of Ukrainian language, first as an addition to the "Donnechchyna" newspaper, and then as an independent periodical. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Since the 1990s, several academics (such as some of the fellows of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies) have risen to become advocates of the case for human enhancement while other academics (such as the members of President Bush's Council on Bioethics) have become outspoken critics. (wikipedia.org)
  • knowledge
  • As a polymath, he wrote nearly two hundred professional papers, gaining renown in fields from computer science and artificial intelligence to epistemology, and researched high-speed electronics and electro-optics switching devices as a physicist, and in biophysics, the study of memory and knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • separation
  • To refer a patient to another professional for an abortion only adds one degree of separation between the doctor and the act to which they are morally opposed, and completely contradicts their objection in the first place. (lifecharity.org.uk)
  • individual
  • Important individual influences on Milton's tractate include Spanish educator Juan Luis Vives (1492-1540) and Moravian educator John Comenius (1592-1670). (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • These two foundational programmes prepared the medieval university student for the study of philosophy and theology with its heavy emphasis on dialectical reasoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • traditional
  • We argued instead for an integrated approach in which both traditional professional duties and aspirations and forensic duties and aspirations were contained within a robust concept of professionalism. (jaapl.org)
  • Education
  • Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on ethics education in different professions, such as medicine and teaching. (routledge.com)
  • citation needed] Bell served on the Board of Advisors for the Antioch Review, and published some of his most acclaimed essays in the magazine: "Crime as an American Way of Life" (1953), "Socialism: The Dream and the Reality" (1952), "Japanese Notebook" (1958), "Ethics and Evil: Frameworks for Twenty-First Century Culture" (2005), and most recently "The Reconstruction of Liberal Education: A Foundational Syllabus" (2011). (wikipedia.org)
  • values
  • However, it is argued by some that this approach acts against person-centred values found in nursing ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • half
  • Two of his books, the End of Ideology and the Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism were listed by the Times Literary Supplement as among the 100 most important books in the second half of the twentieth century. (wikipedia.org)
  • communication
  • In general, a Masters in communications program helps students establish an understanding of modern-day communication and publishing practices and learn how to apply them in the professional world. (gradschools.com)
  • social
  • School social workers are one of the three professional pupil services groups that provide counseling services to children and adolescents in schools. (wikipedia.org)
  • academic
  • Quoting Erhard's biographer, philosophy professor William Bartley: Having cut himself off from ordinary routes to academic and professional training. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • One of the founding members, Leonard Bloomfield, explained the need for and establishment of the society so that the science of language, similar to but separate from other sciences, could build a "professional consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • People skills that involve interaction, collaboration, and managing others are increasingly important. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the next few years, Erhard brought on as staff at Parents many people who would later become important in est, including Elaine Cronin, Gonneke Spits, and Laurel Scheaf. (wikipedia.org)
  • managers
  • With Internet-based advertising becoming more important, advertising managers who can navigate the digital world should have the best prospects [i] . (gradschools.com)
  • years
  • We recognized some years ago 2 that the discussion of a moral foundation for forensic psychiatry had taken an important turn, in no small part because of Dr. Griffith. (jaapl.org)
  • patient
  • They have subsequently become the foundational spirit underlying the Oath of the Muslim Doctor and, thus, dictate the conduct between a Muslim physician and his or her patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • The nature of nursing means that nursing ethics tends to examine the ethics of caring rather than 'curing' by exploring the everyday interaction between the nurse and the person in care. (wikipedia.org)
  • maintenance
  • Among its functions are the maintenance of journalistic ethics and the preservation of the free speech rights of broadcast journalists. (wikipedia.org)