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  • gauze and tape
  • To keep impetigo from spreading to other parts of the body, the doctor or nurse will probably recommend covering infected areas with gauze and tape or a loose plastic bandage. (kidshealth.org)
  • To avoid spreading impetigo to other parts of the body, cover the infected areas with gauze and tape or a loose plastic bandage. (kidshealth.org)
  • scabs
  • It's important that the school fully understands the nature of impetigo and that the presence of scabs does not necessarily mean that person remains infectious. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • herpetiformis
  • Impetigo herpetiformis is a form of severe pustular psoriasis occurring in pregnancy which may occur during any trimester. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is also known as (von Zumbusch) acute generalized pustular psoriasis in acute cases, and as impetigo herpetiformis during pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • APP tends to occur in women more frequently than in men, and is usually less severe than other forms of generalized pustular psoriasis such as impetigo herpetiformis. (wikipedia.org)
  • strep
  • The same type of strep that causes strep throat can also cause impetigo. (annarbor.com)
  • When impetigo is caused by strep, a person can develop serious heart and kidney problems if it is not promptly treated. (annarbor.com)
  • skin
  • Your parent should call the doctor right away if skin around the impetigo sore becomes red, warm, swollen, or painful if you touch it. (kidshealth.org)
  • If someone in your family or a friend has impetigo, don't touch that person's skin. (kidshealth.org)
  • Impetigo may affect skin anywhere on the body, but is most common around the nose and mouth, hands, and forearms, and in young children, the diaper area. (kidshealth.org)
  • Impetigo can spread to anyone who touches infected skin or items that have been touched by infected skin (such as clothing, towels, and bed linens). (kidshealth.org)
  • Impetigo can affect skin anywhere on the body but often affects the area around the nose and mouth. (kidshealth.org)
  • You also should let your doctor know right away if skin around the impetigo becomes red, warm, swollen, or tender. (kidshealth.org)
  • The first sign of impetigo is a clear, fluid-filled bump, called a vesicle, which appears on the skin. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Impetigo tends to develop in areas of the skin that have already been damaged through some other means such as injury, insect bite, sunburn, diaper rash , chicken pox , or herpes, especially oral herpes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Impetigo is one of the most common skin infections in children. (cigna.com)
  • Children may get impetigo after they have had a cold or allergies that have made the skin under the nose raw. (cigna.com)
  • But impetigo can also develop in completely healthy skin. (cigna.com)
  • Impetigo is a common, highly infectious skin disease. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Impetigo can affect healthy skin (primary) and also broken skin, which has been caused by another condition, eg eczema (secondary). (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • It's true that both of these skin infections are contagious and can be passed on by sexual contact, but impetigo infections can't cause herpes outbreaks and vice versa. (columbia.edu)
  • Impetigo can start because bacteria have gotten into a small cut or insect bite, or even a scratch on the skin. (columbia.edu)
  • Herpes is transmitted through skin-to-skin contact, and unlike impetigo it's pretty unlikely that just sharing a towel or t-shirt with someone that is infected will lead to contracting the virus. (columbia.edu)
  • These bacteria can live on people's skin without causing impetigo or any other visible signs. (annarbor.com)
  • Impetigo can spread from one area of skin to another. (annarbor.com)
  • Other factors can increase the risk of contracting impetigo such as diabetes mellitus, dermatitis, immunodeficiency disorders, and other irritable skin disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • To prevent spread of impetigo to other people the skin and any open wounds should be kept clean. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erythema multiform Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Stevens-johnson syndrome Pemphigous vulgaris HPV insect bites burns Herpes simplex 1/2 Since the common pathogens involved with impetigo are bacteria naturally found on the skin, most prevention (especially in children), is targeted towards appropriate hygiene, wound cleaning, and minimizing scratching (i.e. by keeping nails trimmed and short). (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • 3 Studies also show the high prevalence of concurrent scabies and impetigo in young children, with scabies patients being 2.8 times more likely to have impetigo. (mercola.com)
  • More than 92% of patients with impetigo-associated APSGN have elevated anti-DNase B titers. (medscape.com)
  • only 51% of patients with impetigo-associated APSGN develop an increased ASO titer. (medscape.com)
  • Obtain serum IgM levels in cases of recurrent impetigo in patients with negative S aureus carrier status and no predisposing factors such as a preexisting dermatosis. (medscape.com)
  • sore
  • Scratching a sore or a rash is a common cause - for example, poison ivy can get infected and turn into impetigo. (kidshealth.org)