• induction
  • One model for the induction of tolerance during the very early stages of pregnancy is the Eutherian Fetoembryonic Defense System (eu-FEDS) hypothesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • An exploratory, open-labeled study of patients with Pompe disease, who have previously received Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa) treatment, to evaluate the efficacy, safety and clinical benefit of 2 Immune Tolerance Induction (ITI) regimens in combination with Myozyme. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Specifically, the Contractor shall design and conduct clinical trials at all phases to evaluate the safety, toxicity and efficacy of promising tolerance induction strategies in these disease areas, and design and conduct studies of the underlying mechanisms involved in the induction, maintenance and loss of tolerance as an integral part of Network-sponsored clinical trials, as well as clinical trials supported by other Federal and private organizations and companies. (nih.gov)
  • The immune tolerance to OVA antigen topically applied to the conjunctiva measured by cutaneous delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction, OVA-specific T cell proliferation, Foxp3 induction, and IFN-γ production observed in WT mice was lost in the Spdef-KO mice. (jci.org)
  • Rather there is focus on their role in tolerance induction. (diva-portal.org)
  • The accumulation of citrullinated proteins at synovial inflammation sites suggests that they are possible targets for tolerance induction. (jimmunol.org)
  • Thus, the use of citrullinated peptides-based immunotherapy may be a promising approach for tolerance induction in experimental arthritis and perhaps even in susceptible individuals that are ACPA-seropositive in human arthritis. (jimmunol.org)
  • Currently, the known essential components of allergen tolerance include the induction of allergen-specific regulatory subsets of T and B cells, the immune-suppressive function of secreted factors, such as IL-10 and TGF-β, the production of IgG4 isotype allergen-specific blocking antibodies, and decreased allergic inflammatory responses by mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils in inflamed tissues. (uzh.ch)
  • Anokion is a biotechnology company developing products based on proprietary technology for the induction of antigen-specific immune tolerance. (bioportfolio.com)
  • therapeutics
  • Japanese drugmaker Astellas and Swiss biotech Anokion have hooked up in a deal worth $760 million to create a new US-based firm focused on developing novel immune tolerance therapeutics. (pharmatimes.com)
  • Since 2007 ITI's technologies have been deployed for a range of both academic and industry partners to perform comprehensive cellular and molecular immunological analyses during clinical trials of emerging immune therapeutics, in order to identify novel biomarkers that can predict disease activity, drug safety and efficacy, and serve as companion diagnostics that advance personalized medicine by matching the right patients with the right therapies at the right time. (bio-medicine.org)
  • suppress
  • The eu-FEDS model further suggests that specific carbohydrate sequences (oligosaccharides) are covalently linked to these immunosuppressive glycoproteins and act as "functional groups" that suppress the immune response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunotherapies designed to elicit or amplify an immune response are classified as activation immunotherapies, while immunotherapies that reduce or suppress are classified as suppression immunotherapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medawar
  • This influx of transplant patients highlighted an already serious issue that had baffled Medawar, who was determined to change the negative outcomes by focusing on the mechanism that caused rejection - the immune system. (msu.edu)
  • Burnet, independently of Medawar, came to the conclusion that the immune system must learn to tolerate any self cells, and hypothesized that this must occur during fetal development. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiological
  • however, alternative terms such as "natural" or "acquired" tolerance have at times been used to refer to establishment of tolerance by physiological means or by artificial, experimental, or pharmacological means. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equivalent bioanalytical approaches are becoming increasingly applied in the agricultural and nutritional areas to provide an objective scientific assessment of both the dietary composition of the foods and their functional effects on the immune and other physiological systems. (bio-medicine.org)
  • autoimmune disease
  • Deficits in central or peripheral tolerance also cause autoimmune disease, resulting in syndromes such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1), and immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX), and potentially contribute to asthma, allergy, and inflammatory bowel disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Astellas
  • I am pleased to enter into this agreement with Anokion, under which we will be developing unique and innovative products for antigen-specific immune tolerance" said Kenji Yasukawa, Ph.D., Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer of Astellas. (bioportfolio.com)
  • asthma
  • The goals of this Collaborative Network are to: (1) design a long-term research agenda to accelerate the application of tolerogenic approaches for the treatment of multiple immune system diseases, including autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergic diseases, and graft rejection on solid organ, cell and tissue transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • Tolerance assays could support a number of clinical trials and might provide important clues to understanding how tolerance impacts autoimmune diseases as well as allergy and asthma,' said Adriana Zeevi, Ph.D., professor of pathology and surgery at the university's Starzl Institute and co-principal investigator with Dr. Thomson. (upmc.com)
  • The Immune Tolerance Institute (ITI) is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit corporation founded to fill critical unmet needs for translating fundamental scientific discoveries into new therapies for the broad range of diseases related to the human immune system, including autoimmune diseases, allergy, asthma, cancer, and cardiovascular and infectious diseases. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Tregs
  • Additionally, we find an essential role for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the maintenance of tolerance within the intestine in the absence of Tregs. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Thus, we propose that SOCS1 and PGE2, potentially interacting together, act as an alternative intestinal tolerance mechanism distinct from IL-10 and Tregs. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • regulatory
  • Environmental effects on tolerance - Ambient air pollution, specifically polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in diesel exhaust have been demonstrated to affect FOXP3 gene expression via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in regulatory T-cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • targets
  • Cancer immunosurveillance and immunoediting are based on protection against development of tumors in animal systems and (ii) identification of targets for immune recognition of human cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • This study is being done with the purpose of trying to understand if and why transplant recipients may develop tolerance to their transplanted organ. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Tolerance means being able to lower or take away immunosuppression (anti-rejection medications) without causing organ rejection. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Transplant tolerance, which refers to the state by which a patient's immune system has fully accepted a transplanted organ, is one of the key areas of study of the network, an ambitious $144 million undertaking supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International. (upmc.com)
  • Typically, a life-long regimen of anti-rejection drugs, or immunosuppressive drugs, is required to prevent the transplanted organ from being attacked by the patient's immune system. (upmc.com)
  • cells
  • Still, the placental barrier is not the sole means to evade the immune system, as foreign fetal cells also persist in the maternal circulation, on the other side of the placental barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lack of goblet cells abrogates conjunctival mucosal tolerance. (jci.org)
  • The phenomenon of immune tolerance was first described by Ray D. Owens in 1945, who noted that dizygotic twin cattle sharing a common placenta also shared a stable mixture of each other's red blood cells (though not necessarily 50/50), and retained that mixture throughout life. (wikipedia.org)
  • This material is then displayed to other cells of the immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1882, he studied motile (freely moving) cells in the larvae of starfishes, believing they were important to the animals' immune defenses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biggest weakness in Burnet's theory was that he had no explanation for how the body selected for immune cells that only identified non-self. (wikipedia.org)
  • He reasoned, the immune system would be able to play a factor via a 'bystander effect' in eradicating chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, extensive research is still needed on how the immune response is triggered against dying tumour cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The suppressing and tolerance-inducing effect of Tr1 cells is mediated mainly by cytokines. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical trials
  • With the integration of the Immune Tolerance Institute, the Institute is now supporting numerous clinical trials of immunomodulatory therapies and approaches with advanced flow cytometry, immunoassay and gene expression methods across a range of immune-related studies. (bio-medicine.org)
  • regulate
  • Female sex hormones regulate the Th17 immune response to sperm and Candida albicans ," Human Reproduction , vol. 28, no. 12, pp. 3283-3291, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • transplant
  • Many cases of spontaneous abortion may be described in the same way as maternal transplant rejection, and a chronic insufficient tolerance may cause infertility. (wikipedia.org)
  • PITTSBURGH, November 1, 2000 - Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute have been awarded $728,000 through the Immune Tolerance Network to study a group of transplant patients who are completely off immunosuppressive drugs to see if clues can yield simple laboratory tests predictive of transplant tolerance, the most elusive goal in the field of transplantation. (upmc.com)
  • The new project will enable further study of these patients, and potentially others, to determine how it is that their transplanted organs continue to be accepted by their immune systems without the aid of drugs, and to identify potential tests that can be predictive of who physicians can wean successfully, tests that may determine and be indicative of transplant tolerance. (upmc.com)
  • Since individuals almost always have different "banks" of HLAs, the immune system of the recipient recognizes the transplanted tissue as non-self and destroys the foreign tissue, leading to transplant rejection. (wikipedia.org)
  • tolerogenic
  • Therefore, the study proposed is a laboratory investigation (using blood samples collected from the subjects) comparing immune tolerance and alloreactivity profiles in LT recipients on monotherapy IS or converted to rapamycin monotherapy, to determine tolerogenic properties of the different IS agents. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • These dietary changes, which appear to be providing less tolerogenic conditions during early immune programming, may provide important avenues for preventing disease. (diva-portal.org)
  • distinct
  • The funding will enable both areas of research, as well as others, to be fully explored in order to arrive at a distinct and reliable laboratory profile consistent with the tolerance state. (upmc.com)
  • FINDINGS
  • The Immune Tolerance Network envisions findings of this study to have application to other areas of clinical research, from pancreatic islet transplantation to the treatment of multiple sclerosis. (upmc.com)
  • fetal
  • This is done so that the fetal rhesus D positive erythrocytes are destroyed before the immune system of the mother can discover them and become sensitized. (wikipedia.org)
  • allergic
  • Here, we explore the effects of key perinatal dietary exposures on immune development and susceptibility to allergic disease. (diva-portal.org)
  • treatment
  • Margaret Petroff believes that decoding additional secrets to immune tolerance could lead to treatment breakthroughs for a variety of conditions. (msu.edu)
  • Margaret Petroff, an associate professor in the Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation at Michigan State University (MSU), believes that decoding additional secrets to immune tolerance could lead to treatment breakthroughs for a variety of conditions. (msu.edu)
  • Adults with recent-onset T1D in whom the disease process is subacute afford an opportunity to determine whether mucosal insulin induces tolerance to insulin subsequently injected for treatment. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Research
  • KANNAPOLIS, N.C., June 9, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The David H. Murdock Research Institute (DHMRI) today announced the acquisition of the Immune Tolerance Institute, Inc. (ITI) as a next step in the continued growth of the Institute, located on the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, NC. (bio-medicine.org)
  • cell
  • CONCLUSIONS Although nasal insulin did not retard loss of residual β-cell function in adults with established T1D, evidence that it induced immune tolerance to insulin provides a rationale for its application to prevent diabetes in at-risk individuals. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Taken together, our data suggest that ABMT restores immune tolerance by renewal and modulation of the Teff cell compartment, leading to a strong reduction in proinflammatory (self antigen-specific) T cell cytokine production. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The demonstration of T cell tolerance, particularly that mediated by the immune-suppressive functions of IL-10, led to a major conceptual change in this area. (uzh.ch)
  • host
  • Though some pathogens can evolve to become less virulent in host-pathogen coevolution, tolerance does not refer to the change in the pathogen, but can be used to describe the changes in host physiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • The placenta does not block maternal IgG antibodies, which thereby may pass through the human placenta, providing immune protection to the fetus against infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was instrumental in helping develop the Human Immune Monitoring Center at Stanford University. (wikipedia.org)