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  • patient's body
  • Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a technique that temporarily takes over the function of the heart and lungs during surgery, maintaining the circulation of blood and the oxygen content of the patient's body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using varying water temperatures and a sophisticated computer algorithm, a patient's body temperature can be controlled to the nearest 0.2 °C. It is produced by Medivance, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Arctic Sun has distinctive gel pads, which stick to a patient's body using an adhesive called hydrogel-a substance that adheres to the skin without removing hair follicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The gel pads cover only a portion of a patient's body and subsequently leave most of the body free for augmenting medical procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • The present invention relates to the induction of hypothermia in humans in a predictable and dose responsive fashion by use of a pharmaceutical composition comprising a neurotensin or a neurotensin analog or a synthetic neurotensin or a neurotensin receptor agonist, thereby inducing hypothermia, thus benefiting patients suffering from illnesses characterized by tissue anoxia. (google.com)
  • For dogs, this is 38 o Celsius or 98 o Farenheit as dogs have a higher body temperature than humans. (hubpages.com)
  • citation needed] Humans may also experience lethal hyperthermia when the wet bulb temperature is sustained above 35 °C (95 °F) for six hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coma may have developed in humans as a response to injury to allow the body to pause bodily actions and heal the most immediate injuries before waking. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, the average internal temperature is 37.0 °C (98.6 °F), though it varies among individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • ischemic
  • During clinical death, all tissues and organs in the body steadily accumulate a type of injury called ischemic injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • The absence of oxygen and nutrients from blood during the ischemic period creates a condition in which the restoration of circulation results in inflammation and oxidative damage through the induction of oxidative stress rather than (or along with) restoration of normal function. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] An intriguing area of research demonstrates the ability of a reduction in body temperature to limit ischemic injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a non-invasive precision temperature management system that is used to induce hypothermia in comatose patients that have suffered from Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and patients at risk for ischemic brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms
  • While the features of this disorder tend to worsen over time, affected individuals have a normal life expectancy if signs and symptoms are properly treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • Basic supportive care for cats in shock includes intravenous fluids, external warmth for hypothermia, oxygen supplementation, and atropine to increase heart rate. (petmd.com)
  • Its main job is to pump a regular supply of blood, oxygen, and nutrients through a series of pipes called arteries to all the structures and organs throughout the body. (ottawaheart.ca)
  • Fuhrman showed that slices of rat kidney cortex and brain withstood cooling to 0.2 °C for one hour at which temperature their oxygen consumption was minimal. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the slices were rewarmed to 37 °C their oxygen consumption recovered to normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac arrest
  • Cardiac arrest is a sudden loss of heart function, breathing and consciousness, usually caused by disruptions to the normal electrical activity within the heart. (ottawaheart.ca)
  • Ischemia is the lack of oxygenated blood flow to various body parts and may result from apoplexia, cardiac arrest and asphyxia. (google.com)
  • induction
  • The present invention relates to the use of compounds for the induction of hypothermia, such as for the prophylaxis and treatment of ischemia. (google.com)
  • CPB can be used for the induction of total body hypothermia, a state in which the body can be maintained for up to 45 minutes without perfusion (blood flow). (wikipedia.org)
  • homeostatic
  • It results when the homeostatic control mechanisms of heat within the body malfunction, causing the body to lose heat faster than producing it. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • For non-competitive, everyday active people, plain cool water is recommended, especially in warm weather, for two reasons: It rapidly leaves the digestive tract to enter the tissues where it is needed, and it cools the body from the inside out. (time-to-run.com)
  • It uses a heart-lung machine to maintain perfusion to other body organs and tissues while the surgeon works in a bloodless surgical field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most tissues and organs of the body can survive clinical death for considerable periods. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduction
  • The decrease in the rate of injury can be approximated by the Q10 rule, which states that the rate of biochemical reactions decreases by a factor of two for every 10 °C reduction in temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • organs
  • Ischemia is the lack of oxygenated blood flow to various body parts and organs. (google.com)
  • This stresses the body, causing the release of toxic compounds that can overwhelm the organs and result in long-term brain injury. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Hence it is important to identify the parts of the body that most closely reflect the temperature of the internal organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Taking a person's temperature is an initial part of a full clinical examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Without special treatment after circulation is restarted, full recovery of the brain after more than 3 minutes of clinical death at normal body temperature is rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • The addition of a drug treatment protocol has been reported to allow recovery of dogs after 16 minutes of clinical death at normal body temperature with no lasting brain injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cooling treatment alone has permitted recovery after 17 minutes of clinical death at normal temperature, but with brain injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under laboratory conditions at normal body temperature, the longest period of clinical death of a cat (after complete circulatory arrest) survived with eventual return of brain function is one hour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later on (day 5 to day 10 from the clinical onset), temperature will lower to a normal range (38.0-39.5°C), but the disease will continue to progress, despite a possible apparent clinical improvement (appetite comes back). (wikipedia.org)
  • Invasive cooling catheter companies have claimed that catheters can lower body temperature at a faster rate, which is relevant because most of the clinical data suggests that the sooner cooling initiates the better a patient's outcome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rapid
  • Ventricular fibrillation is a rapid, chaotic rhythm originating in the lower chambers of the heart resulting in the heart not being able to pump blood to the rest of the body. (ottawaheart.ca)
  • surroundings
  • The formula also uses updated heat transfer theory, which factors heat loss from the body to its surroundings during cold and windy conditions. (weather.gov)
  • Human heat-loss mechanisms are limited primarily to sweating (which dissipates heat by evaporation, assuming sufficiently low humidity) and vasodilation of skin vessels (which dissipates heat by convection proportional to the temperature difference between the body and its surroundings, according to Newton's law of cooling). (wikipedia.org)
  • heart
  • A normal, healthy heart is a muscle that works as a pump. (ottawaheart.ca)
  • Emergency treatment includes CPR and defibrillation (a controlled electric shock used to try to return the heart to its normal rhythm). (ottawaheart.ca)
  • Heart attacks caused by people shoveling snow and hypothermia from prolonged exposure to the cold are also consequences of severe winter weather. (weather.gov)
  • CPB mechanically circulates and oxygenates blood for the body while bypassing the heart and lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Soviet scientist Sergei Brukhonenko developed a heart-lung machine for total body perfusion in 1926 which was used in experiments with canines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood circulation can be stopped in the entire body below the heart for at least 30 minutes, with injury to the spinal cord being a limiting factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several studies, as well as expert consensus, indicate that the normal resting adult human heart rate is probably a range between 50 and 90 bpm, though the American Heart Association states the normal resting adult human heart rate is 60-100 bpm. (wikipedia.org)
  • While heart rhythm is regulated entirely by the sinoatrial node under normal conditions, heart rate is regulated by sympathetic and parasympathetic input to the sinoatrial node. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normal resting heart rates range from 50-90 bpm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides dealing with critical illness of the nervous system, neurointensivists also treat the medical complications that may occur in their patients, including those of the heart, lung, kidneys, or any other body system, including treatment of infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypothermia: One third to half of people with coronary artery disease will have an episode where their heart stops. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevents
  • This lack of a rectal opening prevents solid waste from being expelled from the kid's body. (tennesseemeatgoats.com)
  • This is evident from studies of tracers and their migration across the blood-brain barrier, in which hypothermia attenuates extravasation several hours after ischemia and prevents vasogenic oedema . (google.com)
  • Hypothermia prevents the production of free radicals such as hydroxyl and nitric oxide during reperfusion after brain ischemia [19; (google.com)
  • heat
  • Each liter of sweat dissipates about 600 kcalories of heat, preventing a rise in body temperature of almost 10° C. The body routes its blood supply through the capillaries just under the skin, and the skin secretes sweat to evaporate and cool the skin and the underlying blood. (time-to-run.com)
  • Body heat builds up and triggers maximum sweating, but without sweat evaporation due to the high humidity, and therefore little cooling takes place. (time-to-run.com)
  • Carbohydrate depletion brings on fatigue in the athlete, but as already mentioned, a build-up of body heat can be life-threatening. (time-to-run.com)
  • If reducing heat loss is not enough to maintain their body temperature, the cattle must start to produce heat. (gov.on.ca)
  • The temperature where heat production must begin is referred to as the Lower Critical Temperature (LCT). (gov.on.ca)
  • The LCT of a cattle beast with average hair coat is 0° C (32° F). Having a heavy winter coat will lower an animal's LCT to -7° C (20° F). If the hair coat gets wet, the insulating factor drops and LCT rises to 14° C (57° F). Hair coats matted down by manure or mud are also unable to capture body heat for the animal. (gov.on.ca)
  • If too little heat is used, hypothermia will become a greater threat than usual. (weather.gov)
  • Sensors attached to the people measured heat loss from their bodies. (weather.gov)
  • Exposure to water will speed up the process tremendously - being cold and wet draws out body heat much quicker than just being cold. (hubpages.com)
  • Body temperature drops more quickly in water than on land, and it doesn't take long for hypothermia (when the body loses heat faster than it can produce it) to set in. (kidshealth.org)
  • It was then found that local differences were present, since heat production and heat loss vary considerably in different parts of the body, although the circulation of the blood tends to bring about a mean temperature of the internal parts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Convection: Increasing blood flow to body surfaces to maximize heat transfer across the advective gradient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiation: releasing heat by radiating it away from the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The former is an acute temperature elevation caused by exposure to excessive heat, or combination of heat and humidity, that overwhelms the heat-regulating mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • In severe cases, temperatures can exceed 40 °C (104 °F). Heat stroke may be non-exertional (classic) or exertional. (wikipedia.org)
  • Significant physical exertion in hot conditions can generate heat beyond the ability to cool, because, in addition to the heat, humidity of the environment may reduce the efficiency of the body's normal cooling mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • protective
  • This protective effect of hypothermia on renal ischaemic damage was confirmed by Bogardus who showed a protective effect from surface cooling of dog kidneys whose renal pedicles were clamped in situ for 2 hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • 98.6
  • Reported values vary depending on how it is measured: oral (under the tongue): 7002309950000000000♠36.8±0.4 °C (7002309927777777777♠98.2±0.72 °F), internal (rectal, vaginal): 37.0 °C (98.6 °F). A rectal or vaginal measurement taken directly inside the body cavity is typically slightly higher than oral measurement, and oral measurement is somewhat higher than skin measurement. (wikipedia.org)
  • vagina
  • The rectum has traditionally been considered to reflect most accurately the temperature of internal parts, or in some cases of sex or species, the vagina, uterus or bladder. (wikipedia.org)
  • kidneys
  • Prior to this, kidneys had been stored at normal body temperatures using blood or diluted blood perfusates, but no successful reimplantations had been made. (wikipedia.org)
  • The beneficial effect of hypothermia on ischaemic intact kidneys was demonstrated by Owens in 1955 when he showed that, if dogs were cooled to 23-26 °C, and their thoracic aortas were occluded for 2 hours, their kidneys showed no apparent damage when the dogs were rewarmed. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was not until 1958 that it was shown that intact dog kidneys would survive ischaemia even better if they were cooled to lower temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • core
  • Complete and proper functioning of the body is dependent on maintaining a core temperature between 36.5-38.5 °C (97.7-101.3 °F). A core temperature above 41.5 °C or below 33.5 °C causes a fast decline in proper functioning of the body and may result in injury or death. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • It's a common misconception that furry animals are sufficiently protected against any temperature, simply because of their coat! (hubpages.com)
  • During sleep a slow heartbeat with rates around 40-50 bpm is common and is considered normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • late afternoon
  • Body temperature normally fluctuates over the day, with the lowest levels around 4 a.m. and the highest in the late afternoon, between 4:00 and 6:00 p.m. (assuming the person sleeps at night and stays awake during the day). (wikipedia.org)
  • loses
  • Sweat is the obvious manner in which the body loses water, while exhaling also leads to loss of via water vapor. (time-to-run.com)
  • stroke
  • The neuroprotective efficacy of induced hypothermia following or during ischemia of the brain is evident in experimental animal models of stroke [1 -1 (google.com)
  • Re- lease of excitotoxic neurotransmitters might also cause progressive neuronal death in the penumbra in stroke patients , and hypothermia after cerebral ischemia could attenuate this process. (google.com)
  • fail
  • However, in certain situations, the body may fail to shield us from Mother Nature and homeostasis doesn't work. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Resuscitation
  • Cryonics (from Greek κρύος kryos meaning 'cold') is the low-temperature preservation (usually at −196°C) of people who cannot be sustained by contemporary medicine, with the hope that resuscitation and restoration to full health may be possible in the far future. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neonatal nurses are a vital part of the neonatal care team and are required to know basic newborn resuscitation, be able to control the newborn's temperature and know how to initiate cardiopulmonary and pulse oximetry monitoring. (wikipedia.org)
  • Procedure
  • DHCA induces hypothermia to aid preplanned surgery, whereas EPR is an emergency procedure in cases where an emergency room patient is rapidly dying from blood loss and will not otherwise survive long enough for the patient's wounds to be stitched up. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coronary artery bypass surgery, also known as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, pronounced "cabbage") surgery, and colloquially heart bypass or bypass surgery, is a surgical procedure to restore normal blood flow to an obstructed coronary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • Efficient swimming by reducing water resistance involves a horizontal water position, rolling the body to reduce the breadth of the body in the water, and extending the arms as far as possible to reduce wave resistance. (like2do.com)
  • below
  • Cryonics uses temperatures below −130°C, called cryopreservation, in an attempt to preserve enough brain information to permit future revival of the cryopreserved person. (wikipedia.org)
  • survive
  • It was not until 1958 that it was shown that intact dog kidneys would survive ischaemia even better if they were cooled to lower temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, research into the possibilities of using breath to test for alcohol in a person's body dates as far back as 1874, when Francis E. Anstie made the observation that small amounts of alcohol were excreted in breath. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • On average, the body has a relative density of 0.98 compared to water, which causes the body to float. (like2do.com)
  • Since the human body is only slightly less dense than water, water supports the weight of the body during swimming. (like2do.com)
  • Other effects are due to water temperature and heat transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another way that the sea levels rise is when temperatures increase, the water molecules expands and require more space. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both men and women may sometimes wear swimsuits covering more of the body when swimming in cold water (see also wetsuit and dry suit). (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Doctors suggested the cold had placed her into a hibernation-like state, protecting her body from serious damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The beneficial effect of hypothermia on ischaemic intact kidneys was demonstrated by Owens in 1955 when he showed that, if dogs were cooled to 23-26 °C, and their thoracic aortas were occluded for 2 hours, their kidneys showed no apparent damage when the dogs were rewarmed. (wikipedia.org)
  • This protective effect of hypothermia on renal ischaemic damage was confirmed by Bogardus who showed a protective effect from surface cooling of dog kidneys whose renal pedicles were clamped in situ for 2 hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • higher
  • Poor metabolizers of CYP 2D6 will metabolize perphenazine more slowly and will experience higher concentrations compared with normal or "extensive" metabolizers. (nih.gov)
  • Body temperature is regularly higher than in any other cattle disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • mass
  • The normal value for dead space volume (in mL) is approximately the lean mass of the body (in pounds), and averages about a third of the resting tidal volume (450-500 mL). (wikipedia.org)
  • stops
  • The same thing happens when the temperature climbs into the 90s: the skin stops losing heat to the air and absorbs it instead. (blogspot.com)
  • medical
  • Cryonics is regarded with skepticism within the mainstream scientific community and is not part of normal medical practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • approximately
  • The temperature outside was approximately −24 °C (−11 °F). As the girl customarily had a bottle at 2 am, her mother became concerned when she awoke at 3 am and Erika was not beside her in bed. (wikipedia.org)
  • whole body
  • Some patients opt to have only their head, rather than their whole body, cryopreserved. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent innovation is the burqini, favored by some Muslim women, which covers the whole body and head (but not face) in a manner similar to a diver's wetsuit. (wikipedia.org)
  • hours
  • In a study in which normal volunteers (n=12) received perphenazine 4 mg q8h for 5 days, steady-state concentrations of perphenazine were reached within 72 hours. (nih.gov)
  • She is primarily known for having been revived after spending two hours without a heartbeat due to hypothermia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Around the country the weather was wetter than normal for July with exceptional rainfall in County Limerick in the last 24 hours of July giving rise to this figure. (wikipedia.org)
  • especially
  • In the 1930s, new materials were being developed and use in swimwear, particularly latex and nylon, and swimsuits gradually began hugging the body, especially women's swimsuits. (wikipedia.org)
  • slightly
  • Everyone's inner temperature cycles around a slightly different genetically determined version of 98.6 set by the hypothalamus, the brain region that serves as thermostat. (blogspot.com)
  • changes
  • Sirs is a condition where there are systemic changes in the body which are characteristic of inflammation . (healthtap.com)
  • hair
  • Bruxism(grinding of teeth) can be seen Circular raised patches of hair all over the body Haemorrhages in the ocular and vaginal mucous membranes A degree of anaemia Lymph node enlargement and even hyperthermia can occur asymptomatically in enzootic area, during the disease season. (wikipedia.org)
  • version
  • These are an updated version of full-body swimwear, which has been available for centuries, but conforms with Islam's traditional emphasis on modest dress. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • It may be located in any part of the body, but most commonly in the lungs, brain, urinary tract, skin or abdominal organs. (wikipedia.org)