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  • transfusion
  • 5 , 6 Early in the new millennium, however, this transfusion paradigm was challenged mainly based on the results from the US Military in Iraq, where thawed AB fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was administered together with RBCs, as well as platelet concentrates (PCs) from the start of resuscitation. (bloodjournal.org)
  • acidosis
  • Resuscitation is complete when the oxygen debt has been repaid, tissue acidosis eliminated, and normal aerobic metabolism restored in all tissue beds. (east.org)
  • Many patients may appear to be adequately resuscitated based on normalization of vital signs, but have occult hypoperfusion and ongoing tissue acidosis (compensated shock), which may lead to organ dysfunction and death. (east.org)
  • rats
  • The study was conducted in an authorized animal care unit (agreement number A-93-008-01) under the supervision of authorized researchers (F.A., M.-P.P.). It was based on a model combining volume-controlled and uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock that has been used in several animal studies, including studies in rats. (asahq.org)
  • perfusion
  • Shock is a life-threatening medical condition of low blood perfusion to tissues resulting in cellular injury and inadequate tissue function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The typical signs of shock are low blood pressure, rapid heart rate, signs of poor end-organ perfusion (i.e., low urine output, confusion, or loss of consciousness), and weak pulses. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • However, rapid normalization or deliberately providing supernormal resuscitation has not led to good outcomes in the clinic or in the laboratory. (asahq.org)
  • Shock can have a variety of effects, all with similar outcomes, but all relate to a problem with the body's circulatory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • 19 Despite controversy with regard to the definition, the aim of these definitions remains the same: early identification of patients with life-threatening bleeds, to ensure proper resuscitation and prevention of complications associated with resuscitation. (scielo.org.za)
  • Among the 289 patients who received delayed fluid resuscitation, 203 (70%) survived and were discharged from hospital, compared with 193 of the 309 patients (62%) who received immediate fluid resuscitation. (asahq.org)
  • RESUSCITATION of patients in hemorrhagic shock remains one of the most challenging aspects of trauma care. (asahq.org)
  • Because the lethal triad in trauma is founded on patients presenting with hemorrhagic shock - something less commonly seen in EGS patients - its use to guide operative decision making in EGS patients may not be appropriate. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 7 This resuscitation regimen was based on the notion that it was problematic to dilute the concentration of platelets and coagulation factors by RBCs before administering platelets and plasma to massively bleeding patients. (bloodjournal.org)
  • clot
  • 1 - 3 Nevertheless, infusion of a large amount of fluid can cause blood loss and severe hemodilution, induce clot dislocation, and reduce the concentration of platelet and coagulant factors, resulting in deterioration of the resuscitation effect (particularly for uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock). (asahq.org)
  • Issues with fluid resuscitation without control of bleeding is thought to be secondary to dislodgement of the thrombus (blood clot) that is helping to control further bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, fluid resuscitation will dilute coagulation factors that help form and stabilize a clot, hence making it harder for the body to use its natural mechanisms to stop the bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • We hypothesize that oxygen transport measurements will be associated with clot strength during traumatic shock, and test this hypothesis using a swine model of controlled traumatic shock. (biomedcentral.com)
  • ScvO 2 should be further studied for its utility as a clinical marker of both tissue hypoxia and clot formation during traumatic shock. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Citation
  • citation needed] The shock index (heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure) is a stronger predictor of the impact of blood loss than heart rate and blood pressure alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood pressure
  • 2 These authors recommended delaying fluid infusion until bleeding is definitively controlled or until the hypotensive target blood pressure is reached. (asahq.org)
  • Administering vasopressor agents on fluid resuscitation can help rapidly achieve the target blood pressure and limit volume fluid requirements and hemodilution. (asahq.org)
  • Use of the traditional markers of successful resuscitation, including restoration of normal blood pressure, heart rate, and urine output, remain the standard of care per the Advanced Trauma Life Support Course . (east.org)
  • Blood pressure alone may not be a reliable sign for shock, as there are times when a person is in circulatory shock but has a stable blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the general signs for all types of shock are low blood pressure, decreased urine output, and confusion, these may not always be present. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of cardiogenic shock include: Distended jugular veins due to increased jugular venous pressure Weak or absent pulse Abnormal heart rhythms, often a fast heart rate Pulsus paradoxus in case of tamponade Reduced blood pressure Distributive shock includes infectious, anaphylactic, endocrine (e.g., adrenal insufficiency), salicylate toxicity, and neurogenic causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • platelet
  • ScvO 2 measured during shock was also selected by forward stepwise selection as an important covariate in linear regression models of TEG-MA after adjusting for the covariates fibrinogen, pH, platelet count, and hematocrit (Whole model R 2 = 0.99, p ≤ 0.032). (biomedcentral.com)
  • normal
  • While a fast heart rate is common, those on β-blockers, those who are athletic and in 30% of cases of those with shock due to intra abdominal bleeding may have a normal or slow heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • While the general signs for all types of shock are low blood pressure, decreased urine output, and confusion, these may not always be present. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The shock index (heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure) is a stronger predictor of the impact of blood loss than heart rate and blood pressure alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of cardiogenic shock include: Distended jugular veins due to increased jugular venous pressure Weak or absent pulse Abnormal heart rhythms, often a fast heart rate Pulsus paradoxus in case of tamponade Reduced blood pressure Distributive shock includes infectious, anaphylactic, endocrine (e.g., adrenal insufficiency), salicylate toxicity, and neurogenic causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • The history of modern burn resuscitation can be traced back to observations made after large urban fires at the Rialto Theatre (New Haven, Conn) in 1921 and the Coconut Grove nightclub (Boston, Mass) in 1942. (medscape.com)