• clinical
  • We agree that there are many potential risks associated with hyperoxia, including but not limited to reductions in coronary and cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, increased oxidative stress, delay in recognising a clinical deterioration and rebound hypoxaemia if oxygen therapy is abruptly stopped. (bmj.com)
  • Hyperoxia may have a role in the clinical management of RD. Retinal reattachment surgery is frequently needed once a detachment is detected, but patients often must wait for a period before reattachment surgery. (arvojournals.org)
  • mechanisms
  • In the present short review, we briefly described the development, application and mechanisms of hyperoxia preconditioning in the neurology, and the issues in future application of hyperoxia preconditioning were also proposed. (nih.gov)
  • however, the mechanisms connecting hyperoxia and the inflammatory response to lung damage is not clear. (jimmunol.org)
  • effects
  • Based on the protective effects of hyperoxia that have already been demonstrated in animals, treating RD with supplemental O 2 may be a safe, relatively easy way to improve visual recovery during and after reattachment surgery. (arvojournals.org)
  • Although the beneficial effects of hyperoxia have been demonstrated histologically, and a theoretical explanation has been proposed, there are no oxygen data available to validate the theory or assess the extent of protection that hyperoxia might afford. (arvojournals.org)
  • tissue
  • In addition, elevated collagen level, transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor protein expression in conditioned medium were also found in hyperoxia LFs. (springer.com)
  • Chen CM, Wang LF, Chou HC, Lang YD, Lai YP (2007) Up-regulation of connective tissue growth factor in hyperoxia-induced lung fibrosis. (springer.com)
  • primary
  • The primary culture of LFs from hyperoxia-exposed rats is a feasible method for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of lung fibrosis caused by BPD at the cellular level. (springer.com)
  • patients
  • On another day, measurements were repeated at a second baseline (B2) and during hyperoxia (100% oxygen breathing) for 15 normal subjects and 13 glaucoma patients. (bmj.com)
  • Hyperoxia can also indirectly cause carbon dioxide narcosis in patients with lung ailments such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or with central respiratory depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal
  • Hyperoxia resulted in reduced PSV and EDV in the ophthalmic arteries of normal subjects only (p = 0.001 and 0.031 respectively). (bmj.com)