• Measures
  • Measures of parenting behavior, parental psychosocial functioning, and child psychosocial functioning will be collected. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Percentages of behaviors as a function of total verbalizations (for praise, negative talk, demanding) or as a function of commands and questions (for impatient and responsive) were computed.Three subjects dropped prior to completing this assessment and one participant completed the other endpoint measures but not the DPICS, which is why the total N for this outcome is 23 at study endpoint. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Before each session, parents also fill out the Intensity Scale of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI), which measures the child's current frequency of disruptive behavior at home. (wikipedia.org)
  • comorbid
  • Not all persons with tics will also have other conditions and not all persons with tics require treatment, but when comorbid disorders are present, they often require treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • respondent is asked
  • Each item presents a behavior, and the respondent is asked to rate on a 4-point scale, if that behavior applies to the child with the following response options: 0: "Not True" 1: "Somewhat or Sometimes True" 2: "Very or Often True" 3: "Completely or Always True" The Positive Social scale in Section II contains two subscales: a compliant/calm subscale and an adaptive social subscale. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormal
  • In contrast to the abnormal movements of other movement disorders (for example, choreas, dystonias, myoclonus, and dyskinesias), the tics of Tourette's are temporarily suppressible, nonrhythmic, and often preceded by an unwanted premonitory urge. (wikipedia.org)
  • An eating disorder is a mental disorder defined by abnormal eating habits that negatively affect a person's physical or mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • bulimia
  • Up to 4% of women have anorexia, 2% have bulimia, and 2% have binge eating disorder at some point in time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bulimia nervosa is a disorder characterized by binge eating and purging, as well as excessive evaluation of one's self-worth in terms of body weight or shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bulimia nervosa (BN), characterized by recurrent binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors such as purging (self-induced vomiting, eating to the point of vomiting, excessive use of laxatives/diuretics, or excessive exercise). (wikipedia.org)
  • Autism Spectrum
  • The Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form (NCBRF) is an instrument designed to assess the behavior of children with intellectual or developmental disabilities and those with Autism Spectrum Disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autism spectrum disorder is a disorder of the cortex, which controls higher functions, sensation, muscle movements, and memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of those with fragile X syndrome, prevalence of concurrent autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been estimated to be between 15 and 60%, with the variation due to differences in diagnostic methods and the high frequency of autistic features in individuals with fragile X syndrome not meeting the DSM criteria for an ASD. (wikipedia.org)
  • phonic tics
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • In children, problems paying attention may result in poor school performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basis for the therapeutic process in RFP-C is that all behavior has meaning and that some children engage in disruptive behaviors as a way to avoid experiencing painful or threatening emotions such as guilt, shame, and sadness. (wikipedia.org)
  • RFP-C was codified in 2016 with the publication of the Manual Of Regulation-Focused Psychotherapy for Children (RFP-C) With Externalizing Behaviors: A Psychodynamic Approach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Manual of regulation-focused psychotherapy for children (RFP-C) with externalizing behaviors: A psychodynamic approach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Young children with communication disorders may not speak at all, or may have a limited vocabulary for their age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some children with communication disorders have difficulty understanding simple directions or are unable to name objects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most children with communication disorders are able to speak by the time they enter school, however, they continue to have problems with communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other stress theories suggest that even small stresses can accumulate to result in emotional, behavioral, or social disorders in children. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2017 study tested all 20,000 genes in about 4,300 families with children with rare developmental difficulties in the UK and Ireland in order to identify if these difficulties had a genetic cause.They found 14 new developmental disorders caused by spontaneous genetic mutations not found in either parent (such as a fault in the CDK13 gene). (wikipedia.org)
  • They estimated that about one in 300 children are born with spontaneous genetic mutations associated with rare developmental disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children between 0 and 36 months with ASD show a lack of eye contact, seem to be deaf, lack a social smile, do not like being touched or held, have unusual sensory behavior and show a lack of imitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The initial goal was to provide a "fresh air" experience for children from the city whose behavior negated other summer options. (wikipedia.org)
  • When both autism and FXS are present, a greater language deficit and lower IQ is observed as compared to children with only FXS. (wikipedia.org)
  • The different ways in which parents are taught to respond to positive versus negative behavior in children is sometimes referred to as differential reinforcement. (wikipedia.org)
  • person's
  • It is characterized by problems paying attention, excessive activity, or difficulty controlling behavior which is not appropriate for a person's age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Negative parenting practices and negative child behavior contribute to one another in a "coercive cycle", in which one person begins by using a negative behavior to control the other person's behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • That person in turn responds with a negative behavior, and the negative exchange escalates until one person's negative behavior "wins" the battle. (wikipedia.org)
  • conduct
  • Additionally, students considered "socially maladjusted", but ineligible for an EBD classification (i.e., students diagnosed with conduct disorder), often receive better educational services in special education classrooms or alternative schools with high structure, clear rules, and consistent consequences, which they would not receive in general education settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychotic
  • Indicate the General Medical Condition] Top Schizophrenia 295.20 Catatonic type 295.10 Disorganized type 295.30 Paranoid type 295.60 Residual type 295.90 Undifferentiated type 295.40 Schizophreniform disorder 295.70 Schizoaffective disorder 297.1 Delusional disorder Erotomanic subtype Grandiose subtype Jealous subtype Persecutory subtype Somatic subtype Mixed type 298.8 Brief psychotic disorder 297.3 Shared psychotic disorder Psychotic disorder due to. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • Signs include impairments in social interactions, communication and repetitive or restricted patterns of interest or behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • inappropriate
  • Inappropriate types of behavior (acting out against self or others) or feelings (expresses the need to harm self or others, low self-worth, etc.) under normal circumstances. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnostic criteria
  • As with all DSM-5 mental disorders, an individual must have functional impairment in at least one domain (e.g., academic, occupational, social relationships, or family functioning) in order to meet diagnostic criteria for an externalizing disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • suicidal
  • A person with EBD with "internalizing" behavior may have poor self-esteem, suffer from depression, experience loss of interest in social, academic, and other life activities, and may exhibit non-suicidal self-injury or substance abuse. (wikipedia.org)
  • anxiety
  • Social withdrawal behaviors, including avoidance and indifference, appear to be the best predictors of ASD in FXS, with avoidance appearing to be correlated more with social anxiety while indifference was more strongly correlated to severe ASD. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tourette's
  • Tourette's is defined as part of a spectrum of tic disorders, which includes provisional, transient and persistent (chronic) tics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although Tourette's is the more severe expression of the spectrum of tic disorders, most cases are mild. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • The assessment contains 76 items 10 Positive/Social items and 66 Problem Behavior items). (wikipedia.org)
  • Controversy over the social constructionist view comes from a number of studies that cite significant psychological and social differences between those diagnosed with the disorder, and those who are not. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gerald Coles argues that school failure must be viewed and treated in the context of both the learning environment and the child's individual abilities, behavior, family life, and social relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, parents learn to reward appropriate behavior through social rewards (such as praise, smiles, and hugs) as well as concrete rewards (such as stickers or points towards a larger reward as part of an incentive system created collaboratively with the child). (wikipedia.org)