• avascular
  • This site is not intended for people who suffers from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), gout, avascular necrosis (AVN), and cancer within bones, osteoporosis and other inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. (cartilage.org)
  • Despite much research, the causes remain unclear but include repetitive physical trauma, ischemia (restriction of blood flow), hereditary and endocrine factors, avascular necrosis (loss of blood flow), rapid growth, deficiencies and imbalances in the ratio of calcium to phosphorus, and problems of bone formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • degenerative
  • Orthopedic surgeons use both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal injuries, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, bone tumours, and congenital limb deformities. (wikipedia.org)
  • sesamoid bones
  • Acute or chronic injures to the sesamoid bones or their associated tendon and joint capsule apparatus may cause pain, limping and difficulty wearing shoes, all aggravated by even a simple activity like walking. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • In the human body at birth, there are over 270 bones, but many of these fuse together during development, leaving a total of 206 separate bones in the adult, not counting numerous small sesamoid bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • femur
  • The meniscus acts as a cushion and stabilizing platform between the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone). (noyeskneeinstitute.com)
  • These bones are the femur (thigh bone), tibia (shin bone), and patella (kneecap). (noyeskneeinstitute.com)
  • The largest bone in the body is the femur or thigh-bone, and the smallest is the stapes in the middle ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • The trabeculae are aligned towards the mechanical load distribution that a bone experiences within long bones such as the femur. (wikipedia.org)
  • The femoral head (femur head or head of the femur) is the highest part of the thigh bone (femur). (wikipedia.org)
  • Its surface is smooth, coated with cartilage in the fresh state, except over an ovoid depression, the fovea capitis, which is situated a little below and behind the center of the head, and gives attachment to the ligament of head of femur. (wikipedia.org)
  • fracture
  • Shock wave therapy is sometimes employed in the case of splint bone fracture or stress fractures to the cannon bones, to improve blood flow to the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • The callus of a splint bone fracture can push on the adjacent suspensory ligament, leading to lameness from secondary suspensory desmitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its matrix is mostly made up of a composite material incorporating the inorganic mineral calcium phosphate in the chemical arrangement termed calcium hydroxylapatite (this is the bone mineral that gives bones their rigidity) and collagen, an elastic protein which improves fracture resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • ligaments
  • In Charcot's disease, bodies composed of bone are formed in relation to the capsular and other ligaments, and may be made to grate upon one another. (manual-of-surgery.com)
  • Inflammatory products, such as inflammatory mediators and cytokines, damage articular cartilage and have been shown to weaken intraarticular ligaments. (wikipedia.org)
  • trabecular
  • Some studies show that 80% of those who sustained ACL tears had concomitant bone bruises (subchondral trabecular microfracture). (drlintner.com)
  • As far as short bones are concerned, trabecular alignment has been studied in the vertebral pedicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • durable
  • The early uses of MSCs focused on the implantations of cell rich matrixes during open surgeries, resulting in the formation of hyaline-like durable cartilage. (hindawi.com)
  • Genetic
  • Careers requiring repetitive or intense motion can increase the risk of developing cartilage problems, but there are several other risk factors, including age, weight and genetic predisposition. (cartilage.org)
  • commonly
  • During the immobilization period, isometric exercises, such as straight leg raises, are commonly used to restore muscle loss without disturbing the cartilage of the affected joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • joint
  • There are several types of bone and joint pain, each with many potential sources or etiologies. (cartilage.org)
  • The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a compressive load, the cartilage deforms to increase contact area and spread the load over a greater area of the joint. (drlintner.com)
  • normal
  • Stress fractures occur when an athlete applies abnormal repetitive stress to normal bone or applies normal repetitive stress to a weakened bone. (podiatrytoday.com)