• Bacterial Infections
  • Today it is more commonly used in veterinary practice to treat mild to severe bacterial infections caused by penicillin resistant and penicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus sutbtilis, Klebsiella, Clostridium diptheriae, Salmonella and Shigella. (wikipedia.org)
  • Superficial
  • Smaller objects can be removed without much difficulty if the depth of the wound remains superficial, but if the wound does not protrude past the subcutaneous layers of the skin, and remains inert, the object can actually remain in place. (wikipedia.org)
  • In larger objects, fragments that remain superficial in one's body may be removed without much trouble, but if wounds protrude past the subcutaneous layers of the skin and even into the muscular area or near vital organs, such objects must be left alone until immediate medical attention is sought. (wikipedia.org)
  • poorly
  • 4. The use according toone of the claims 1 to 3, charakterized in that the diabetes-associated wound is a poorly healing wound, in particular a diabetic ulcer. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Because it is also poorly absorbed after oral administration the use of this drug for humans declined rapidly, especially since the second generation of cephalosporins was introduced in the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the drug is poorly penetrated into the cerebrospinal fluid and is found in a much smaller amount in the cerebral cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • hepatitis C vir
  • Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmissions require blood exposure, and since saliva is usually blood-free, the risk of HCV-HIV transmission from a biter to a bitee is negligible. (emresident.org)
  • See 'Management of healthcare personnel exposed to HIV' and 'Prevention of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection among healthcare providers' . (uptodate.com)
  • species
  • Most of the 14 described species have been associated with human diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traumatic insemination, also known as hypodermic insemination, is the mating practice in some species of invertebrates in which the male pierces the female's abdomen with his aedeagus and injects his sperm through the wound into her abdominal cavity (hemocoel). (wikipedia.org)
  • injection
  • Immediate injection of a local anesthetic in and around the wound, or a regional nerve blockade, can be helpful, as can the use of parenteral opiates such as intramuscular pethidine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cephaloridine is distributed well into the liver, stomach wall, lung and spleen and is also found in fresh wounds one hour after injection. (wikipedia.org)
  • microbes
  • Macrophages play an important role in wound healing, in particular by killing microbes. (jove.com)
  • drainage
  • A 27-year-old male presents to the emergency department complaining of purulent drainage from a wound to his right hand. (emresident.org)
  • inflammation
  • Inflammation is a fundamental aspect of many human diseases. (jove.com)
  • Given the important role of inflammation in a variety of human diseases, we believe this non-invasive imaging method can help investigate the differential roles of neutrophils and macrophages in a variety of pathological conditions. (jove.com)
  • Wood splinters must be removed from wounds because they are associated with inflammation and risk of infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • susceptible
  • The disease caused by this fungus occurs mainly on ripe fruits, such as strawberries, melon and peach, which are more susceptible to wounds and have a higher sugar content. (wikipedia.org)
  • spines
  • Some spines may break off as the barb exits the wound and stay within the victim causing prolonged envenoming. (wikipedia.org)
  • trigger
  • It is very beneficial in treating problems close to the surface such as wounds, cuts, scars, trigger points, and acupuncture points and is particularly effective in treating infections. (gesundohnepillen.de)
  • often
  • the wound must be thoroughly cleaned, and surgical exploration is often required to remove any barb fragments remaining in the wound. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pathogenic strains often promote infections by producing virulence factors such as potent protein toxins, and the expression of a cell-surface protein that binds and inactivates antibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is still one of the five most common causes of hospital-acquired infections and is often the cause of wound infections following surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Gastroenteritis typically occurs after the ingestion of contaminated water or food, whereas wound infections result from exposure to contaminated water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention of HIV and infection with hepatitis viruses following a needlestick exposure is also discussed in detail elsewhere. (uptodate.com)
  • fungus
  • When the fungus germinates, it produces different kinds of esterases, including cutinase, which help the fungus to penetrate the plant cell wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zygomycosis is the main disease that might be caused by this fungus in humans and while it is not entirely understood yet, this disease is very dangerous and can be fatal. (wikipedia.org)
  • tetanus
  • Tetanus, also known as lockjaw, is an infection characterized by muscle spasms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infection can be prevented by proper immunization with the tetanus vaccine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In those who have a significant wound and less than three doses of the vaccine, both immunization and tetanus immune globulin are recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • deaths
  • In 2015 there were about 209,000 infections and about 59,000 deaths globally. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, due to limited contact between these spiders and humans, deaths have always been rare, and since the introduction of anti-venom in Australia, there have been no funnel web related deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • Up to 50,000 deaths each year in the USA are linked with S. aureus infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • several spiders are known to have venom that can cause injury to humans in the amounts that a spider could inject when biting. (wikipedia.org)
  • While S. aureus usually acts as a commensal bacterium, asymptomatically colonizing about 30% of the human population, it can sometimes cause disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • A splinter is a fragment of a larger object (especially wood), or a foreign body that penetrates or is purposely injected into a body. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • citation needed] Many victims of stingray related injuries suffer from physical effects including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, extreme pain at the wound, muscle cramps, and a laceration at the puncture site. (wikipedia.org)
  • animal
  • 6 It also emphasises the importance of a basic knowledge of human and animal normal mouth flora to ensure appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. (scielo.org.za)
  • Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. (jove.com)