Loading...


  • vectors
  • El Nino is an extreme weather pattern that is often responsible for increased precipitation, resulting in increased flooding, creating a more promising breeding ground for a plethora of vectors that both carry and cause infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another result of the warming oceans are stronger hurricanes, which will wreck more havoc on land, and in the oceans, and create more opportunities for vectors to breed and infectious diseases to flourish. (wikipedia.org)
  • These winds can carry vectors tens of thousands of kilometers, resulting in an introduction of new infectious agents to regions that have never seen them before, making the humans in these regions even more susceptible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientific and medical information on these thread-like parasitic nematodes that are transmitted by arthropod vectors. (dmoztools.net)
  • Because of their habit of ingesting blood, ticks are vectors of at least twelve diseases that affect humans and other animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • mainly
  • The cysts of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm were also well known in ancient cultures mainly because of their presence in slaughtered and sacrificed animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • This condition was documented so well mainly because of its presence in slaughtered and sacrificed animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a vascular disease that is commonly triggered by the involvement of change in temperature, which leads to syndromes including (first and second degree) burning pain, increased temperature, erythema and swelling, of mainly the hands and feet that are affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • It occurs in Central and South America, chiefly among the poorest strata of the population, who live in dwellings infested by transmitters of the disease (bloodsucking hemipterous insects, mainly triatomids). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • affect humans
  • Though rinderpest or 'cattle plague' doesn't affect humans directly, it sowed terror when it struck, as it was capable of wiping out entire herds of cattle, sparking famine across communities when they were suddenly found without a source of food and income from cattle raising. (fao.org)
  • In 1978, having identified a successful treatment for a type of worms affecting horses, Campbell realised that similar treatments might be useful against related types of worms that affect humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • digestive tract
  • The human digestive tract is approximately 25 to 28 feet long with a stomach acidity between 1.5 and 2.5, whereas dogs and cats have a much shorter digestive system at an average of 10 to 13 feet for dogs (shorter for cats) with an acidity of less than 1. (shirleys-wellness-cafe.com)
  • Provides information on these worms that can infest the human digestive tract. (dmoztools.net)
  • severe
  • This disease is of great importance to the UK livestock industry as Cryptosporidium infected animals may suffer from diarrhoea, loss of appetite and dehydration leading to poor growth rates and, in severe cases even death. (hccmpw.org.uk)
  • Prevention of severe disease involves screening the population at risk with blood tests for TbG. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacterium Pasteurella multocida and its genus can pose a risk of severe diseases in high-risk groups such as the elderly, transplant recipients, cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme Disease
  • The black legged tick, a carrier of Lyme disease, when not feeding, spends its time burrowed in soil absorbing moisture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The natural environmental controls that used to keep the tick populations in check are disappearing, and warmer and wetter climates are allowing the ticks to breed and grow at an alarming rate, resulting in an increase in Lyme disease, both in existing areas and in areas where it has not been seen before. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fleas and ticks can carry pathogenic organisms that infect a person with Lyme disease, tick borne encephalitis, and Rocky mountain spotted fever Statistics generated by the state of Ohio document that Cat bites are about 20% of all animal bites per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to their role in transmitting Lyme disease, ixodid ticks, particularly the North American I. scapularis, have been studied using geographic information systems to develop predictive models for ideal tick habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes the diseases in west and central Africa, whereas Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense has a limited geographical range and is responsible for causing the disease in east and southern Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • In livestock industry the disease causes heavy economic backlashes due to poor production of milk, meat and wool. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the chronic state the disease causes inflammation of the bile ducts, gall bladder and may cause gall stones as well as fibrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protozoa
  • Provides information on the pathogenic protozoa that can be found in the blood and tissues of humans, in each case providing the identity of the organism, the vector and details of the disease caused. (dmoztools.net)
  • echinococcosis
  • The results of the present study indicated that cystic echinococcosis/hydatidosis is prevalent in both human and animal population in study areas which attracts serious attention from veterinary and public health authority to reduce economic burden and in designing appropriate strategy for prevention and control of disease. (degruyter.com)
  • threat
  • They cause high rates of death and disease in animals , thereby having serious socio-economic and sometimes public health consequences while constituting a constant threat to the livelihoods of livestock farmers. (fao.org)
  • The Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) is FAO's corporate centre for the planning and delivery of veterinary assistance to FAO member countries responding to the threat of transboundary animal health crises. (fao.org)
  • A panel of experts in both human and animal healthcare called for greater collaboration in combating the increasing threat of animal-transmitted infectious diseases and to more effectively innovate under the umbrella of One Health to prevent and treat chronic diseases that are common to animals and people. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • eradicate
  • As the tsetse fly is the main vector of transmission, making the fly immune to the disease by altering its genome could be the main component in an effort to eradicate the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Magda Chlebus, director of Science Policy at the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) said: "Human, animal and environmental health face many common or related challenges. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Systemic disease and reproductive wastage are common, and cattle appear to waste away. (wikipedia.org)
  • In regions of the world where the disease is common eflornithine is provided for free by the World Health Organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • We firmly believe it could lead to the faster development of sophisticated health tools and technologies that will not only better protect against infectious diseases, but also help tackle some of the major chronic disease challenges of the 21st century, such as cardiovascular disease and osteoarthritis. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • diagnosis
  • Diagnosis basically relies on a combination of postmortem analyses, clinical signs displayed by the animals, and response to drenching. (wikipedia.org)
  • fevers
  • High-impact animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease , peste des petits ruminants , classical or African swine fevers , while not directly affecting human health, do affect food and nutrition security and livestock production and trade. (fao.org)
  • control
  • The study will also look at the methods farmers currently use to prevent and control the disease and determine which are the most effective. (hccmpw.org.uk)
  • FAO has mobilized over US$ 445 million to combat influenza and emerging disease threats through prevention, surveillance, and control. (fao.org)
  • To increase the resilience of vulnerable households to shocks and stresses through restored production capacity and value addition, temporary employment, and animal disease control. (fao.org)
  • with the rational use of anti-infectives, vaccines and other control measures in both humans and animals. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • health
  • The FAO Emergency Prevention System (EMPRES) Animal Health develops strategies for intervention and improved management. (fao.org)
  • The Emergency Management Centre for Animal Health (EMC-AH) is FAO's rapid response unit to animal disease emergencies. (fao.org)
  • The effects of global warming include its gayon human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • The observed and projected increased frequency and severity of climate related impacts will further exacerbate the effects on human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • A good example of the impact of global warming on health can be seen in the disease Erythromelalgia. (wikipedia.org)
  • THE NETHERLANDS - Experts in animal and human health called on the medical, veterinary, public health and related healthcare communities to collaborate more closely to prevent and combat diseases, reports Zoetis. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The event was sponsored by the animal health company Zoetis. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Animal-transmitted infectious diseases will continue to be a major health challenge in the future. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • As effective preventative measures are beyond the abilities of any one healthcare organisation, a diverse collection of private and public organisations, researchers, physicians and veterinarians are increasingly collaborating under the umbrella of One Health to protect both human and animal health, as well as to ensure the supply of safe and affordable food 1 . (thepoultrysite.com)
  • There are tools, methodologies and competencies to approach these challenges, but there is a need to invest in sustainable new solutions, and more importantly, to improve cooperation between human and animal health. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The EFPIA invited animal health companies to jointly address the One Health challenge in the framework of the EU public-private Innovative Medicines Initiative. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Affirming its commitment to One Health collaborations, Michelle Haven, a veterinarian and senior vice president of Corporate Development, Alliances and Solutions at Zoetis said: "We are enthusiastic about the idea of fostering closer collaboration between human and animal health. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • In the event that you use the information for your own health, or for your animals, you are prescribing for yourself or your animals, which is your constitutional right and for which the author of this site assumes no responsibility. (shirleys-wellness-cafe.com)
  • With the World Health Organization they created an "unprecedented" drug donation program, with the intention of wiping out the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungal
  • For example, the big-vein disease of lettuce was long thought to be caused by a member of the fungal division Chytridiomycota, namely Olpidium brassicae. (wikipedia.org)
  • worms
  • Stories of other patients with autoimmune diseases, like Smith, who are deliberately infecting themselves with worms have surfaced. (go.com)
  • Symptoms increase with the number of worms present and may include shortness of breath and fever in the beginning of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Symptoms and treatment for kidney disease vary depending the specifics of the case, but oftentimes, a diet change can help. (petmd.com)
  • Thus, it is common for people diagnosed with cancer to have been treated for other diseases, which were hypothesized to be causing their symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • Immune system use the antibodies to identify foreign objects like bacteria and virus and help to fight with the disease . (gethealthyharlem.org)
  • Rat-bite Fever (RBF) is an rodent borne disease caused by two types of bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis, which is predominany in North America and Spirillum minus, predominantly in Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rat-bite fever is contacted by bites or scratches from an infected rodent, contaminated food or beverages with either bacteria, or by handling rodents with the disease, without necessariliy being bitten or scratched by the rodent. (wikipedia.org)
  • specifically
  • More specifically, drawing from animal studies from his laboratory, pig whipworms appear to activate cells that regulate the immune system so that it doesn't overreact. (go.com)
  • smallpox
  • Vaccines have eliminated naturally occurring smallpox, and nearly eliminated polio, while other diseases, such as typhus, rotavirus, hepatitis A and B and others are well controlled. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1983, Enzo Paoletti and Dennis Panicali at the New York Department of Health devised a strategy to produce recombinant DNA vaccines by using genetic engineering to transform ordinary smallpox vaccine into vaccines that may be able to prevent other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • eradicate
  • Efforts to eradicate the disease by treating entire groups of people twice a year are ongoing in a number of areas of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • reservoirs
  • Control strategies are largely limited to destruction of animal reservoirs, treatment of infected patients, and management of sand fly populations. (springer.com)
  • Warmer winters and increased rainfall will make it more likely for rodent populations to survive, therefore increasing the number of rodent reservoirs for disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Mitochondrial dysfunction is very often associated with a variety of human diseases that occur across a life span, from early childhood to late in life. (pvlsi.org)
  • rodent
  • Rodent borne disease can be transmitted through different forms of contact such as rodent bites, scratches, urine, saliva, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans can be infected with Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome through direct contact with rodent drippings, saliva, or urine infected with strains of the virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Increased rainfall accompanied by flooding can also increase human to rodent contact Global climate change will affect the distribution and prevalence of roboviruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inadequate hygiene and sanitation, as seen in some European countries, also contribute to increase rodent populations and higher risks of rodent borne disease transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • tobacco
  • Although it was known from the late 19th century that an infectious disease was damaging tobacco crops, it was not until 1930 that the infectious agent was determined to be a virus. (wn.com)
  • genetic
  • Animal Husbandry is very focused on health issues related to genetic diseases - e.g., hip dysplasia is some dog breeds. (physicsforums.com)
  • This reduction of genetic information has committed M. haemofelis to a parasitic lifestyle in which it is entirely dependent upon host cells for the amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins it has lost the ability to synthesize. (wikipedia.org)
  • beings
  • The human beings who are scattered over this space do not form, as in Europe, so many branches of the same stock. (gradesaver.com)
  • molecular
  • The long-term objectives of my group are to understand how mitochondrial dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration and diseases such as cancer and diabetes, as well as the molecular, biochemical, and physiological causes of mitochondrial dysfunction. (pvlsi.org)
  • It has become clear that mitochondrial dysfunction should be considered in investigating all those diseases for which molecular and biochemical explanations are lacking. (pvlsi.org)
  • vaccination
  • DNA vaccination is a technique for protecting against disease by injection with genetically engineered DNA so cells directly produce an antigen, producing a protective immunological response. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • Eight years ago, New Yorker Herbert Smith did the unthinkable -- he swallowed thousands of pig whipworm eggs in a desperate bid to quell his advancing Crohn's disease. (go.com)
  • plant
  • This is similar to pollination in that the plant produces food resources (for example, fleshy fruit, overabundance of seeds) for animals that disperse the seeds (service). (wikipedia.org)
  • flesh
  • The maggots hatch and burrow into the flesh, distressing the animal and causing economic loss to the farmer Otodectes cynotis, the cat ear mite, responsible for Canker. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because Hebrew law absolutely forbade the eating of human flesh or the drinking of any type of blood, Lilith's blood drinking was described as exceptionally evil. (wikipedia.org)
  • aggressive
  • In 28 Days Later (2002), a horror film set in post-apocalyptic Britain, an artificial virus called "Rage" causes humans to become frenzied and uncontrollably aggressive. (wikipedia.org)
  • various
  • That is why people who raise animals for various reasons require the services of veterinarians to keep their animals as healthy as possible. (physicsforums.com)
  • Sensitivity reactions: Urticaria, rash, pruritus and eosinophilia in white blood cell counts Other locations/body as a whole: Lower back pain, myalgia, arthralgia, fever, sweating, various cardiac arrhythmias, and hypotension Animal studies have failed to reveal evidence of fetal harm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later, animals were also flown to investigate various biological processes and the effects microgravity and space flight might have on them. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • M. marinum sometimes causes a rare disease known as aquarium granuloma, which typically affects individuals who work with fish or keep home aquariums. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Our laboratory is focused on developing cellular and animal models for partial complex I deficiency. (pvlsi.org)
  • The retrovirus is now generally called HTLV-I because later studies proved that ATLV is the same as the firstly identified human retrovirus called HTLV discovered by Bernard Poiesz and Francis Ruscetti and their co-workers in the laboratory of Robert C. Gallo at the National Cancer Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • Consistent with its parasitic lifestyle, the M. haemofelis genome contains a significant number of genes devoted to adhesins, resistance to oxidative stress, and the production of variable surface antigens that allow it to persist in the host. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • He discovered that the muscardine disease of silkworms was caused by a living, very small, parasitic organism, a fungus that would be named eventually Beauveria bassiana in his honor. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • How do animals have better immune systems than humans? (physicsforums.com)
  • Can a human being become so immune just like animals? (physicsforums.com)
  • 3) We also 'let them die' more often, possibly causing evolution to 'work better' than it has in humans, since (in the developed world) we save people at virtually any cost, people with weak immune systems are able to grow up and reproduce. (physicsforums.com)
  • Animals are most prone to suffering from disease when they are very young, very old, injured, or malnourished, all situations in which their immune systems and other defenses either haven't yet developed fully or have been degraded. (physicsforums.com)
  • prevention
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) states that control and prevention of vector-borne diseases are emphasizing "Integrated Vector Management (IVM)", which is an approach that looks at the links between health and environment, optimizing benefits to both. (wikipedia.org)
  • response
  • Few experimental trials have evoked a response strong enough to protect against disease and the technique's usefulness remains to be proven in humans. (wikipedia.org)