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  • acute promyelo
  • In an accompanying commentary, Praveen Raju, at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, notes that the data provide rationale for considering ATO as a therapy for cancers other than acute promyelocytic leukemia. (redorbit.com)
  • soluble
  • Iron does test only very weakly positive for the Ames test for cancer, however, since it is such a strong catalyst and essential for the production of ATP and consequently DNA production, any excess soluble iron is toxic especially over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • India
  • Skin score correlates with global DNA methylation and GSTO1 A140D polymorphism in arsenic-affected population of Eastern India. (nih.gov)
  • This blog deals with the deep-rooted conspiracy how the rainbow alliance of Maoist-TMC-Congress-SUCI with support and fund of capitalists, land-lords, finance capital, corporate media, imperialists and few sold out perverted intellectuals, so-called human right organizations and anti-national NGOs are bent upon weakening the mainstream leftist movement in India. (blogspot.in)
  • 2017
  • A recent report (Science, 2017) Shows more the investigation of 1200 samples was carried out and approximately more than 66% samples contained arsenic above WHO recommended limit. (wikipedia.org)
  • drinking water
  • The principal treatment is to provide the patient with arsenic free drinking water. (bicn.com)
  • Where drinking water is rusty colored and has arsenic, the rusty particles may concentrate the arsenic. (umass.edu)
  • To determine if arsenic is present, arrange to test your drinking water at a state certified laboratory. (umass.edu)
  • Now, "the presence of arsenic in drinking water is becoming a widespread health problem," said Luis Rodriguez-Lado, a chemist with the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain who was not involved in the study. (canadianinquirer.net)
  • Now, drinking water is the villain in what CBS television once called 'the greatest poisoning in human history. (worldwatch.org)
  • Through drinking water, more than 200 million people globally are exposed to higher than safe levels of arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inorganic arsenites (arsenic(III)) in drinking water have a much higher acute toxicity than organic arsenates (arsenic(V)). The acute minimal lethal dose of arsenic in adults is estimated to be 70 to 200 mg or 1 mg/kg/day. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2007 study found that over 137 million people in more than 70 countries are probably affected by arsenic poisoning of drinking water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimation of Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Food (Raw and Cooked) in a Rural Village of Northern Chile. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, with over 8 million wells constructed, approximately one in five of these wells is now contaminated with arsenic above the government's drinking water standard. (wikipedia.org)
  • Programmes to provide 'safe' drinking-water over the past 30 years have helped to control these diseases, but in some areas they have had the unexpected side-effect of exposing the population to another health problem-arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wells
  • More than 60 percent of the wells in this subdistrict are contaminated with arsenic and unsafe to drink from,' explains Sayed Ershad, a development worker who has spent the last several years grappling with the disaster. (worldwatch.org)
  • Many people still drink the poison water from the wells. (worldwatch.org)
  • The arsenic poses no danger to any residents, he said, and no private wells were impacted by the readings discovered at The Links at Boynton Beach , the public course at 8020 Jog Road. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • In six of nine wells, the arsenic concentration ranged from 27 and 460 parts per billion, according to the report. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • He said any explanation of why a few test wells revealed such high arsenic content would be speculation. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • About 7-11 million wells or hand pumped wells are providing arsenic polluted water to local people. (wikipedia.org)
  • antimony
  • Like germanium, selenium, and bromine, which like arsenic succeed the 3d transition series, arsenic is much less stable in the group oxidation state of +5 than its vertical neighbors phosphorus and antimony, and hence arsenic pentoxide and arsenic acid are potent oxidizers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1957, it was found by Chinese scientists that DMSA can effectively treat antimony poisoning due to overdose of tartar emetic. (wikipedia.org)
  • cadmium
  • Due to its low permissible exposure to humans, overexposure may occur even in situations where trace quantities of cadmium are found. (wikipedia.org)
  • The relative activities of a series of novel monoalkyl esters of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) have been examined as agents for the mobilization of cadmium, lead and arsenic owing to the ability of these monoesters to cross cell membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sources of toxic metals include cadmium from tobacco, arsenic from agriculture and mercury from volcanoes and forest fires. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lead and cadmium: lead and cadmium poisoning can lead to gastrointestinal, kidney, and neurological dysfunction. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxidative
  • Moreover, arsenic could cause oxidative stress by depleting the cell's antioxidants, especially the ones containing thiol groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pentavalent arsenic tends to be reduced to trivalent arsenic and trivalent arsenic tends to proceed via oxidative methylation in which the trivalent arsenic is made into mono, di and trimethylated products by methyltransferases and an S-adenosyl-methionine methyl donating cofactor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mercury
  • Most artificial food coloring contains lead, mercury, and arsenic. (townsendletter.com)
  • DMSA was first synthesized by V. Nirenburg in the Urals Polytechnic Institute, commissioned by one of the electrical enterprises of Sverdlovsk, which consumed many tons of mercury and was looking for a medicine to prevent poisoning of personnel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pronounced protective effect in animal poisoning with arsenic and mercury was first shown by I. Okonishnikova in 1962. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mercury poisoning can lead to neurological disease and kidney failure if left untreated. (wikipedia.org)
  • unsafe
  • Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources (PCRWR) has released a report ( PDF link here ) which found 10 brands of bottled water unsafe for human consumption, with Butt Water somehow making that list. (webwire.com)
  • trace
  • The evidence that arsenic may be a beneficial nutrient at trace levels below the background to which living organisms are normally exposed has been reviewed. (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • Arsenic poisoning also damages mucous membranes, irritates eyes, causes darkening and lesions of the skin, damages and inflames the liver, damages the heart, causes hearing loss, and results in degeneration of the peripheral nervous system. (beyondpesticides.org)
  • Application of cDNA microarray to the study of arsenic-induced liver diseases in the population of Guizhou, China. (semanticscholar.org)
  • No question too much arsenic can cause trouble, but so can too much vitamin A which can cause liver damage. (canadafreepress.com)
  • Both DMA(III) and DMA(V) were shown to release iron from horse spleen as well as from human liver ferritin if ascorbic acid was administered simultaneously. (wikipedia.org)
  • sulfide
  • Others include botulinum, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and epibatidine, the toxic that native Indians use to make poison darts. (canadafreepress.com)
  • The other principal arsenic sulfide is As4S4, a red-orange solid known as the mineral realgar. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sulfide centres are two-fold coordinated to two arsenic atoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, many ores, especially sulfide minerals, are contaminated with arsenic, which is released in roasting (burning in air). (wikipedia.org)
  • aquifers
  • to carry out a more detailed study of three small areas (thanas) to assess the possible source, mobility and fate of arsenic in the aquifers. (bicn.com)
  • Pakistan is aware of the growing problem, with arsenic levels rising in some areas as people increasingly and indiscriminately draw from the country's underground aquifers, said Lubna Bukhari, who heads the government's Council for Research in Water Resources. (canadianinquirer.net)
  • pigments
  • Trimethylarsine, produced by microbial action on arsenate-derived pigments Arsenic-containing ribose derivatives (R = several groups) A topical source of arsenic are the green pigments once popular in wallpapers, e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphorus
  • Black arsenic is similar in structure to black phosphorus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic has a similar electronegativity and ionization energies to its lighter congener phosphorus and as such readily forms covalent molecules with most of the nonmetals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although phosphate and arsenate are structurally similar, there is no evidence that arsenic replaces phosphorus in DNA or RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • acid
  • Dimethylarsinic acid, DMA(V), caused DNA single stand breaks resulting from inhibition of repair enzymes at levels of 5 to 100 mM in human epithelial type II cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dissolved arsenic species is the pyramidal trianion AsS3− 3: As2S3 + 6 NaSH → 2 AsS3− 3 + 3 H2S As2S3 is the anhydride of the hypothetical thioarsenous acid, As(SH)3. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic contaminated water typically contains arsenous acid and arsenic acid or their derivatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic acid tends to exist as the ions [HAsO− and [H2AsO in neutral water, whereas arsenous acid is not ionized. (wikipedia.org)
  • alloys
  • There are other historical or existing industrial sites that could result in release of arsenic to the environment including: manufacturing of metals and alloys, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, chemicals, and petroleum refining, waste incineration and the use of coal ash as fill material. (umass.edu)
  • The primary use of metallic arsenic is in alloys of lead (for example, in car batteries and ammunition). (wikipedia.org)
  • crops
  • Arsenic has been widely used throughout the United States and the Northeast as a pesticide on fruit orchards and on some other crops. (umass.edu)
  • DMSA
  • The use of DMSA is not approved for prevention of lead poisoning in anticipation of exposure in known lead contaminated environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • DMSA can cross the blood-brain barrier of mice, but not that of humans, limiting its use to extracting heavy metals from parts of the body other than the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Genetic polymorphisms in Glutathione S-transferase Omega (GSTO) and cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 20 studies. (nih.gov)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services reports minimal risk levels (Table 1). (townsendletter.com)
  • Various high-risk groups such as people suffering from malnutrition, protein deficiency, and hepatitis B infection may be more sensitive to the effects of arsenic. (umass.edu)
  • ISLAMABAD - Some 50 million people are at risk of arsenic poisoning from contaminated groundwater in Pakistan's Indus Valley _ far more than previously thought, according to a new study. (canadianinquirer.net)
  • Arsenic exposure in Latin America: biomarkers, risk assessments and related health effects. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Arsenic increases the risk of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moderate exposure to the sun contributes to the production of melanin and vitamin D by the body, but excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays has negative health effects, including sunburn and increased risk of skin cancer, as well as depressed immune system function and accelerated aging of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • If arsenic is present in well water, several types of home treatment systems are available for removing or reducing the amount of arsenic in water, including: absorptive media, reverse osmosis, anion exchange, and distillation. (umass.edu)
  • According to the study: "Two years after their treatment the patients had arsenic blood and urine levels well below safety limits, and only slightly higher than controls. (canadafreepress.com)
  • Homeopathy is not a plausible system of treatment, as its dogmas about how drugs, illness, the human body, liquids and solutions operate are contradicted by a wide range of discoveries across biology, psychology, physics and chemistry made in the two centuries since its invention. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was also denied cancer treatment unless he would recant his criticism of the government, but refused. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1904 they successfully prepared a red arsenic dye they called Trypan Red for the treatment of sleeping sickness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paul Ehrlich used organoarsenic ("arsenicals") for the treatment of syphilis, demonstrating the relevance of metals, or at least metalloids, to medicine, that blossomed with Rosenberg's discovery of the anti-cancer activity of cisplatin (cis-PtCl2(NH3)2). (wikipedia.org)
  • The aid agencies later hired foreign experts who recommended treatment plants that were inappropriate to the conditions, were regularly breaking down, or were not removing the arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Those plans stalled as the housing market tanked, but the study discovered clusters of high arsenic content. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Prevention is by using water that does not contain high levels of arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, arsenic of these valences is readily absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, which accounts for its high toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Too much iron deposited in tissues or high levels in the blood stream has been successfully linked to a vast majority of human diseases from Alzheimer's to Malaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a high-profile problem due to the use of deep tubewells for water supply in the Ganges Delta, causing serious arsenic poisoning to large numbers of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • tellurium
  • It is a nonmetal with properties that are intermediate between the elements above and below in the periodic table, sulfur and tellurium, and also has similarities to arsenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • LEAD
  • Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) has been recommended for the treatment of lead poisoning in children by poison control centers around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chemists learned that EDTA was particularly effective in treating lead poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1950s, Norman Clarke, Sr. was treating workers at a battery factory for lead poisoning when he noticed that some of his patients had improved angina pectoris following chelation therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of these, such as the changing patterns of stream flow and presence of lead in groundwater, can be directly correlated with human activity and industrial processes, while others, such as cyclones and flooding are naturally occurring issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of lead in the water affects the environment, as well as human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic
  • Importantly, the use of drugs (whether chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or targeted therapy) constitutes systemic therapy for cancer in that they are introduced into the blood stream and are therefore in principle able to address cancer at any anatomic location in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic therapy is often used in conjunction with other modalities that constitute local therapy (i.e. treatments whose efficacy is confined to the anatomic area where they are applied) for cancer such as radiation therapy, surgery or hyperthermia therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic insecticides, which poison pollen and nectar in the flowers[citation needed], may kill bees and other needed pollinators[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Trimethylarsine, once known as Gosio's gas is an intensely malodorous organoarsenic compound that is commonly produced by microbial action on inorganic arsenic substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells
  • Traditional chemotherapeutic agents are cytotoxic by means of interfering with cell division (mitosis) but cancer cells vary widely in their susceptibility to these agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis(programmed cell death)i in certain types of cancer cells, which are normally immortal and can multiply without limit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Melanin is produced within the skin in cells called melanocytes and it is the main determinant of the skin color of darker-skinned humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breast Cancer
  • The development of therapies with specific molecular or genetic targets, which inhibit growth-promoting signals from classic endocrine hormones (primarily estrogens for breast cancer and androgens for prostate cancer) are now called hormonal therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • natural
  • Environmental racism is the practice of environmental injustice within a racialized context, in which socially marginalized communities and minority groups are subjected to disproportionate exposure of environmental hazards, denial of access to sources of ecological sustenance such as clean air, water, and natural resources, or infringement of environmentally related human rights. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental health is the branch of public health that is concerned with all aspects of the natural and built environment that may affect human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental health is focused on the natural and built environments for the benefit of human health, whereas environmental protection is concerned with protecting the natural environment for the benefit of human health and the ecosystem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenic contamination of shallow groundwater is a natural occurring problem that has been further made worse by the use of tube wells, which extract groundwater. (wikipedia.org)
  • normally
  • Instead, extremely high levels of the precursor hormone corticosterone are produced, some of which is converted to 11-Deoxycorticosterone (DOC), a potent mineralocorticoid not normally clinically important in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Health is the science, practice, and study of a human's well-being and their health and preventing illnesses and human injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental health has been defined in a 1999 document by the World Health Organization (WHO) as: Those aspects of the human health and disease that are determined by factors in the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of these, arsenic has been determined to be the most significant health issue, with about 49% of the water being likely contaminated with concentrations above the WHO guidelines, affecting 35 to 77 million people within the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a consumer eats fish with high levels of metal contamination, he is at risk for health issues, such as cancer, kidney failure, or various metal poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • metal
  • There has been some effort by the government to provide deeper tube wells that are clearly marked as arsenic free, as well as by various NGOs to provide filters to remove the heavy metal contaminants. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • Although phosphate and arsenate are structurally similar, there is no evidence that arsenic replaces phosphorus in DNA or RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Source
  • There is no more authoritative source on anthropological issues than paleontologist Dr. Richard Leakey, who explains what anyone who has taken an introductory physiology course might have discerned intuitively-that humans are herbivores. (freetheanimal.com)
  • Trimethylarsine, produced by microbial action on arsenate-derived pigments Arsenic-containing ribose derivatives (R = several groups) A topical source of arsenic are the green pigments once popular in wallpapers, e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although
  • The actual skin color of different humans is affected by many substances, although the single most important substance is the pigment melanin. (wikipedia.org)
  • little
  • Researchers suggest that human populations over the past 50,000 years have changed from dark-skinned to light-skinned and vice versa as they migrated to different UV zones, and that such major changes in pigmentation may have happened in as little as 100 generations (≈2,500 years) through selective sweeps. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • The chelating agent may be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or orally, depending on the agent and the type of poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • The term chemotherapy has come to connote non-specific usage of intracellular poisons to inhibit mitosis, or cell division. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Chemotherapy is one of the major categories of the medical discipline specifically devoted to pharmacotherapy for cancer, which is called medical oncology. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Because our foods are extremely lacking in magnesium, our bodies age faster, deteriorate mega fast, causing almost every disease known, including heart attack, stroke and cancer. (n-ergetics.com)
  • It is also given to cancers with a high risk of micrometastatic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • drugs
  • Combined modality chemotherapy is the use of drugs with other cancer treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or hyperthermia therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • presence
  • This is likely due to pregnancy-related factors such as the presence of human placental lactogen that interferes with susceptible insulin receptors. (findmeacure.com)
  • Line
  • These "free" offers are far more subtle than, "Line up for your Kool-Aid laced with cyanide poison! (n-ergetics.com)