• genome
  • When considering why diseases, such as cancer, occur it is important to understand that the human genome contains more than 3 billion DNA bases. (onlineethics.org)
  • Just ten years removed from the sequencing of the entire human genome, we have entered a golden era of genetics. (brighthub.com)
  • The first therapeutic use of gene transfer as well as the first direct insertion of human DNA into the nuclear genome was performed by French Anderson in a trial starting in September 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] This procedure was referred to sensationally and somewhat inaccurately in the media as a "three parent baby", though mtDNA is not the primary human genome and has little effect on an organism's individual characteristics beyond powering their cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gene editing is a potential approach to alter the human genome to treat genetic diseases, viral diseases, and cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • He helped launch Human Genome Sciences and Genetic Therapy Inc. Five years later he became CEO of Discovery Laboratories, an unfunded startup, and within six months raised $22 million through private placement. (wikipedia.org)
  • antisense
  • She worked to produce gene and antisense therapies to treat HIV/AIDS, and researched how the immune system controls HIV in tissue culture and in monkey models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Delivery and Targeting of Oligonucleotide and siRNA-based Therapies: Contributed extensively on the use of antisense and antigene oligonucleotides as well as siRNA for treating liver fibrosis, diabetes and cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • Those who think obesity is due to their genetic makeup relish any news that 'fat genes' have been found as they look to blame something else for their predicament rather than. (brighthub.com)
  • Oncogenes are mutant forms of normal human genes which, if not regulated, can trigger a cell to grow and divide uncontrollably. (brighthub.com)
  • There is already a "microchip that can test a remarkable 1,500 genetic traits at once, including heart disease, seasonal affective disorder, obesity, athletic ability, hair and Eye color, height, susceptibility to alcohol and nicotine addictions, lactose intolerance and one of several genes linked to intelligence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first attempt, an unsuccessful one, at gene therapy (as well as the first case of medical transfer of foreign genes into humans not counting organ transplantation) was performed by Martin Cline on 10 July 1980. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another investigation Lisziewicz is involved with is how human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes regulate immune responses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic engineering, also called genetic modification, is the direct manipulation of an organism's genes using biotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a set of technologies used to change the genetic makeup of cells, including the transfer of genes within and across species boundaries to produce improved or novel organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the absence of this gene, none of the following two opsin genes are expressed in the human retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • OPN1LW and OPN1MW are respectively the genes that contain the genetic code for protein opsin needed for the capture of light, red (Long Wave) and green (Medium Wave). (wikipedia.org)
  • Enzyme
  • The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of anti-idursulfase antibodies on idursulfase safety (measured by infusion related adverse events) between patients who develop anti-idursulfase antibodies and patients who do not after long-term idursulfase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This study is being conducted to satisfy post-marketing commitments to monitor anti-idursulfase antibody development in Hunter syndrome patients after long-term idursulfase enzyme replacement therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Velaglucerase alfa (Gene-Activated™ human glucocerebrosidase;GA-GCB) is produced in a continuous human cell line using proprietary gene-activation technology and has an identical amino acid sequence to the naturally occurring human enzyme. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This treatment protocol will observe the safety of velaglucerase alfa in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease who are either treatment naive (newly diagnosed) or who are currently being treated with the Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) imiglucerase. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Preimplantation
  • This is done using various methods, such as germline engineering or Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Reproductive technology Embryo selection by preimplantation genetic diagnosis Cytoplasmic transfer In vitro-generated gametes Physically: Cosmetic: plastic surgery & orthodontics Drug-induced: doping & performance-enhancing drugs Functional: prosthetics & powered exoskeletons Medical: implants (e.g. pacemaker) & organ replacements Strength training: weights (e.g. barbells) & dietary supplement Mentally: Nootropics, neurostimulation, and supplements that improve mental functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In early 2016, Sierra Sciences announced that they were working with BioViva to start a new medical tourism-based venture, BioViva FIJI, on Fiji and that they will be the first company to use gene therapy to treat biological aging in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • BioViva released data gathered post-therapy in 2016, claiming that independent testing by SpectraCell Laboratories had revealed Parrish's leukocyte telomere length had been extended from 6.71kb to 7.33kb, an amount they state is equivalent to a reversal of 20 years of telomere attrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • enhancement
  • This unit (6) deals specifically with ethical issues raised by genomics in the context of human genetic therapies and human enhancement . (onlineethics.org)
  • Human enhancement (Augment) is "any attempt to temporarily or permanently overcome the current limitations of the human body through natural or artificial means. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human enhancement technologies (HET) are techniques that can be used not simply for treating illness and disability, but also for enhancing human characteristics and capacities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The expression "human enhancement technologies" is relative to emerging technologies and converging technologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some circles, the expression "human enhancement" is roughly synonymous with human genetic engineering, it is used most often to refer to the general application of the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science (NBIC) to improve human performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the 1990s, several academics (such as some of the fellows of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies) have risen to become advocates of the case for human enhancement while other academics (such as the members of President Bush's Council on Bioethics) have become outspoken critics. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • By injecting a therapeutic gene directly into the brain, researchers have treated a naturally occurring genetic disease in cats. (innovations-report.com)
  • This is the first genetic disease affecting the central nervous system to be successfully treated in an animal larger than mice and rats. (innovations-report.com)
  • In our study, we could see that gene therapy used during this particular time led to a restoration of damaged neurons, even though the lesions that represent the disease were already extensive. (innovations-report.com)
  • It causes an often fatal disease in humans called Ebola hemorrhagic fever. (brighthub.com)
  • In 2011 Neovasculgen was registered in Russia as the first-in-class gene-therapy drug for treatment of peripheral artery disease, including critical limb ischemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antonio Regalado, reporter for the MIT Technology Review states, "The experiment seems likely to be remembered as either a new low in medical quackery or, perhaps, the unlikely start of an era in which naive people receive genetic modifications not just to treat disease, but to reverse aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • antigen
  • 2. An antibody as claimed in claim 1, wherein the specificity of either the first antibody or the second antibody is directed against animal or human tumor-associated antigen. (google.com)
  • Biological
  • Human genetic engineering Gene therapy Neurotechnology Neural implants Brain-computer interface Cyberware Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence Nanomedicine 3D bioprinting Mind uploading, the hypothetical process of "transferring"/"uploading" or copying a conscious mind from a brain to a non-biological substrate by scanning and mapping a biological brain in detail and copying its state into a computer system or another computational device. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parrish has also appeared on Australian network ABC's Lateline, discussing BioViva's development of therapies to treat biological ageing. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral
  • Genetic Immunity works to create and commercialize immunotherapeutic biologics to treat chronic viral infections, allergies, and cancers to prolong the life of the patient and improve their quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Crystal structure of human alpha-n-acetylglucosaminidase - The present invention provides the three-dimensional structure of human α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) protein. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Virology is the study of viruses - submicroscopic, parasitic particles of genetic material contained in a protein coat - and virus-like agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viruses arose from mobile genetic elements of cells (such as transposons, retrotransposons or plasmids) that became encapsulated in protein capsids, acquired the ability to "break free" from the host cell and infect other cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • Following early advances in genetic engineering of bacteria, cells, and small animals, scientists started considering how to apply it to medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetically engineered human insulin was produced in 1978 and insulin-producing bacteria were commercialised in 1982. (wikipedia.org)
  • polymers
  • Contributed extensively on polymeric micellar delivery using novel polymers and combination therapy for treating advanced prostate cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • After extensive research on animals throughout the 1980s and a 1989 bacterial gene tagging trial on humans, the first gene therapy widely accepted as a success was demonstrated in a trial that started on 14 September 1990, when Ashi DeSilva was treated for ADA-SCID. (wikipedia.org)
  • ViroStatics was formed In 2007 as a for-profit spin-off from the Research Institute for Human and Genetic Therapy (RIGHT), a US-based 501(c)3 corporation pursuing innovative antiviral therapies and vaccine research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Telomerase gene therapy utilizing an adeno-associated virus undertaken by María Blasco's group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), has demonstrated several beneficial effects and an increase in median lifespan of up to 24% in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discussing her team's research, Blasco has stated in discussion with The Scientist, "We demonstrated that AAV9-Tert gene therapy was sufficient to delay age-related pathologies and extend both median and maximum longevity in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic engineering has been applied in numerous fields including research, medicine, industrial biotechnology and agriculture. (wikipedia.org)
  • 5 January Mae Jemison, the first female African-American astronaut, is selected to head the DARPA- and NASA-sponsored 100-Year Starship project, which aims to conduct research into the technological and human elements needed for manned interstellar travel. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • The topical DermaVir vaccine is an improvement upon the ex vivo dendritic cell- based immunization that could offer a new alternative therapy for patients with HIV. (wikipedia.org)
  • closer
  • The brain of the cat is much closer in size to the human infant brain compared to mice. (innovations-report.com)
  • There has been arguments against the procedures of "savior siblings" because many believe that this will lead humans closer to the creation of designer babies. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • Goodell has been on the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine since 1997 as a member of the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, and the Departments of Pediatrics, Molecular and Human Genetic, and Immunology. (wikipedia.org)
  • She is also a member of the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • BioViva's CEO Liz Parrish appeared on Norwegian television in the program Trygdekontoret to discuss the use of gene and cell therapies to improve health in an aging population. (wikipedia.org)
  • trials
  • As the requirements to progress to human trials had not started, the US Food and Drug Administration did not authorize Parrish's experiments. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatments
  • BioViva is a Bainbridge Island, Washington-based biotechnology company developing treatments to slow the ageing process in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • Thus we think that it may be possible to achieve similar results in humans with as few as 20 to 30 injections in each of the two hemispheres of the brain," Wolfe said. (innovations-report.com)
  • It is the use of technological means to select or alter human characteristics and capacities, whether or not the alteration results in characteristics and capacities that lie beyond the existing human range. (wikipedia.org)
  • member
  • Statements by Sikora have been critical of unproven methods of alternative medicine, after Parliament member Lord Maurice Saatchi proposed a bill allowing doctors to use unproven experimental therapies, and he has spoken out against claims that an alkaline diet can cure cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • There are 75 trillion cells in the human body and because of the large number of cells and the imperfect replication process, some errors can lead to rogue cells: cancers. (onlineethics.org)
  • cancer
  • The best studied example is the association between Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by certain strains of this sexually transmitted virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Engineering
  • Genetic engineering is a process that alters the genetic make-up of an organism by either removing or introducing DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike traditionally animal and plant breeding, which involves doing multiple crosses and then selecting for the organism with the desired phenotype, genetic engineering takes the gene directly from one organism and inserts it in the other. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • 6 January The human brain's ability to function can start to deteriorate as early as age 45, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patient
  • Patient support group for XLH, a genetic condition also known as X-Linked Hypophosphatemia, X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets, Familial Hypophosphatemia, Vitamin D-Resistant Rickets. (medicalhealthsites.com)
  • This leads to an inability of the patient to metabolize phenylalanine, causing elevated levels of Phe in the bloodstream (hyperphenylalaninemia) and mental retardation if therapy is not begun at birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic screening of the OFD1 gene is used to officially diagnose a patient who has the syndrome, this is detected in 85% of individuals who are suspected to have Orofaciodigital syndrome type 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • Following this introduction, Dr Nierman provides an overview of some of the important scientific information we need to know to understand the role of genomics in therapy. (onlineethics.org)
  • Health
  • The first attempt at modifying human DNA was performed in 1980 by Martin Cline, but the first successful nuclear gene transfer in humans, approved by the National Institutes of Health, was performed in May 1989. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although there is a scientific consensus that currently available food derived from GM crops poses no greater risk to human health than conventional food, GM food safety is a leading concern with critics. (wikipedia.org)
  • provides
  • Dr Nierman provides a quick introduction to the human karyotype (the organized profile of a person's chromosomes) to frame our understanding of genomic therapy. (onlineethics.org)