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  • bacillus
  • In the next three years, Nocard demonstrated his great skills in laboratory work in the new science of bacteriology, by developing a number of new techniques, such as methods of harvesting blood serum, new culture media for the bacillus of tuberculosis, the introduction of anesthesia of large animals with intravenous chloral hydrate, as well as for controlling tetanic convulsions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is a vaccine primarily used against tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • Established by Congress to combat a wide range of animal diseases-from infectious disease of swine to bovine pneumonia, Texas cattle fever to glanders-Smith worked under Daniel E. Salmon, a veterinarian and Chief of the BAI. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, the nature of tuberculosis in cattle differs significantly from that in man in that in the former species the diseased animal remains infected for life and is likely to be an "open case", and as a source of contamination for other animals and its environment. (springer.com)
  • Bovine tuberculosis is a very similar disease that infects cattle, as well as deer, goats, elk and many other animals. (realmilk.com)
  • Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a respiratory disease that affects cattle, led to the first livestock science in Queensland. (wikipedia.org)
  • The institute claimed to be the first in the Southern Hemisphere to produce standardised tuberculin on a large scale for testing tuberculosis in cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such cattle can still enter the human food chain but only after a government veterinary surgeon has inspected the carcass and certified that it is fit for human consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • European badgers can become infected with bTB and transmit the disease to cattle, thereby posing a risk to the human food chain. (wikipedia.org)

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  • latent
  • V. O. Kasprowicz, G. Churchyard, S. D. Lawn, S. B. Squire, and A. Lalvani, "Diagnosing latent tuberculosis in high-risk individuals: rising to the challenge in high-burden areas," Journal of Infectious Diseases , vol. 204, supplement 4, pp. (hindawi.com)
  • This test shall be the World's first blood test for discriminating latent from active TB in humans. (lionex.de)
  • diphtheria
  • Over the years, it has been responsible for breakthrough discoveries that have enabled medical science to control such virulent diseases as diphtheria, tetanus, tuberculosis, poliomyelitis, influenza, yellow fever, and plague. (wikipedia.org)
  • The early exploitation of his discovery might have saved millions of lives, especially in World War I. A new age of preventive medicine in France was made possible by such developments from the Institut Pasteur as vaccines for tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, yellow fever, poliomyelitis, and hepatitis B. The discovery and use of sulfonamides in treating infections was another breakthrough. (wikipedia.org)
  • Agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, and other regulatory agencies around the world say that potential pathogens from raw milk, including possibly tuberculosis, diphtheria, typhoid, and streptococcal infections, make it potentially unsafe to consume. (wikipedia.org)
  • swine
  • Codified version of the Council Directive of 26 June 1965 on health problems affecting intra-Community trade in bovine animals and swine (64/432/EEC). (springer.com)
  • zoonotic
  • Despite the apparent public health concern about Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in Tanzania, little has been done regarding the zoonotic importance of the disease and raising awareness of the community to prevent the disease. (scielo.org.za)
  • Bovine tuberculosis is a potential zoonotic disease that can infect a variety of hosts, including humans. (scielo.org.za)
  • Zoonotic diseases, with discussions of diseases of wildlife, farm animals, domestic pets and humans, and real-world issues such as sanitation, economics, food security and evaluating the success of vaccination programmes are covered in detail. (cabi.org)
  • eradication
  • Bovine tuberculosis: a review of current and emerging diagnostic techniques in view of their relevance for disease control and eradication," Transboundary and Emerging Diseases , vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 205-220, 2010. (hindawi.com)
  • The presence of multiple hosts including wild animals, inefficient diagnostic techniques, absence of defined national controls and eradication programs could impede the control of bovine TB. (scielo.org.za)
  • species
  • Babesiosis: Babesia species are examples of tick-borne diseases that affect domestic animals and wildlife, and Babesiosis is an emerging disease in humans. (redorbit.com)
  • influenza
  • Avian influenza: Like human influenza, avian influenza viruses occur naturally in wild birds, though often with no severe consequences. (redorbit.com)
  • infections
  • In warm-blooded animals, including humans, disease resulting from infections with these bacteria is similar. (realmilk.com)
  • Actual infections in humans are nowadays rare in developed countries, mainly because pasteurisation kills M. bovis bacteria in infected milk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans can often acquire these infections through eating freshwater plants such as watercress. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention
  • From 1892 to 1896, he strived to convince the medical and general public, in a series of communications, conferences, booklets and demonstrations, that the use of the tuberculin of Robert Koch could provide the foundations for the prevention of bovine tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and other health agencies of the United States strongly recommend that the public do not consume raw milk or raw milk products. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • The "deadly dozen" diseases will have potential impacts to both human and wildlife health and global economies, the experts said. (redorbit.com)
  • diagnosis
  • Laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis in resource-poor Countries: challenges and opportunities," Clinical Microbiology Reviews , vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 314-350, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • 1994
  • The HPA has said that three-quarters of the 440 human cases reported to the HPA between 1994 and 2006 were aged 50 years and above and only 44 cases (10%) were known to be non-UK born. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between 1994 and 2011 there were 570 human cases of bovine TB in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • The Nocardia may also cause disease in humans, particularly in immunocompromised patients, such as those with AIDS. (wikipedia.org)
  • cows
  • M. bovis can be transmitted to humans through the ingestion of unpasteurised milk and milk products as well as aerosols, from infected cows. (lionex.de)
  • citation needed] M. bovis is usually transmitted to humans by consuming raw, infected cows milk, although it can also spread via aerosol droplets. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • It causes nocardiosis, a disease which manifests itself mainly in animals of economic importance, such as bovine farcy, for which he discovered the first Nocardia, named by him initially as Streptothrix farcinica. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nocard also discovered the virus which causes bovine peripneumonia and studied psittacosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Bovine tuberculosis at the human-livestock-wildlife interface: Is it a public health problem in Tanzania? (scielo.org.za)
  • This paper aims to review the potential health and economic impact of bovine tuberculosis and challenges to its control in order to safeguard human and animal population in Tanzania. (scielo.org.za)
  • The One Health concept of combined veterinary and human health continues to gain momentum, but the supporting literature is sparse. (cabi.org)
  • The report expands on guidelines issued in a recently published paper entitled "Wildlife Health as an Indicator of Climate Change", which examined the harmful impacts of climate change on the health of wild animals and the subsequent effects on human populations. (redorbit.com)
  • A highly pathogenic strain of the disease""H5N1""is currently a major concern for the world's governments and health organizations, specifically because it has proven deadly to domestic and wild birds, as well as humans, and has the potential to evolve into a strain that can spread from human to human. (redorbit.com)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) in humans and bovine TB in farm animals are global health problems of immense social and economic importance. (lionex.de)
  • Due to the government's increased focus on human health, Pound was transferred to the Health Section of the Home Secretary's Department as Government Bacteriologist and the department was renamed the Bacteriological Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Laboratory work relating to human disease remained at the purpose-built facility under the control of the health department until 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, a recent review authored by the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain and experts from Belgian universities and institutions concluded that "raw milk poses a realistic health threat due to a possible contamination with human pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans have always been interested in deviations from health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consumption
  • The transmission of the disease from animals to humans can occur directly through the aerosol route and indirectly by consumption of raw milk. (scielo.org.za)