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  • Arginine
  • Cangitoxin-III (CGTX-III) contains in addition to the previous substitution, a replacement of the 14th amino acid, arginine (R), into histidine (H). Cangitoxin is to varying degrees homologous to the other sea anemone toxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • sugars
  • Asparagine is produced when sugars react to heat, for example: baked goods, potato chips and roasted coffee. (foodista.com)
  • This information is in regard to potato events GEN1-F10, GEN1-E12, GEN1-J3 and GEN1-J55 with reduced levels of free amino acid asparagine, reduced levels of reducing sugars glucose and fructose and reduced levels of polyphenol oxidase. (gc.ca)
  • tumors
  • In contrast, when the researchers fed the animals foods that had a high content of asparagine, the tumors spread more rapidly. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Additionally, to confirm the role played by asparagine in the spread of cancerous tumors, the team analyzed data from breast cancer patients. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • They found that there was a positive correlation between the cancer cells' ability to synthesize asparagine and the tumors' chance of spreading to other sites in the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • UNC Lineberger researchers, including Charles M. Perou, PhD, and Lisa A. Carey, MD, were part of a preclinical study that found blocking the production of asparagine with a drug called L-asparaginase in mice with aggressive triple negative breast tumors, and putting them on a low-asparagine diet, reduced the breast tumor's ability to spread. (unclineberger.org)
  • They found that blocking the production of asparagine with a drug called L-asparaginase in mice with aggressive triple negative breast tumors, and putting them on a low-asparagine diet, greatly reduced the breast tumor's ability to spread. (unclineberger.org)
  • produced in sufficient
  • In individuals with the disability, the enzyme is not produced in sufficient quantity, and the resulting asparagine depletion affects the proliferation and survival of cells during brain development. (health24.com)
  • The essential amino acids are either not produced at all by the body or are not produced in sufficient amounts. (wikibooks.org)
  • mutation
  • A point accepted mutation - also known as a PAM - is the replacement of a single amino acid in the primary structure of a protein with another single amino acid, which is accepted by the processes of natural selection. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a point mutation occurs within an expressed region of a gene, an exon, then this will change the codon specifying a particular amino acid in the protein produced by that gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite the redundancy in the genetic code, there is a possibility that this mutation will then change the amino acid that is produced during translation, and as a consequence the structure of the protein will be changed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Changing a single amino acid in a protein may reduce its ability to carry out this function, or the mutation may even change the function that the protein carries out. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, acceptance of point mutations depends heavily on the amino acid being replaced in the mutation, and the replacement amino acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the value n {\displaystyle n} in the PAMn matrix represents the number of mutations per 100 amino acids, which can be likened to a percentage of mutations, the term percentage accepted mutation is sometimes used. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, 'PAM matrix' refers to one of a family of matrices which contain scores representing the likelihood of two amino acids being aligned due to a series of mutation events, rather than due to random chance. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 'PAMn matrix' is the PAM matrix corresponding to a time frame long enough for n {\displaystyle n} mutation events to occur per 100 amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxins
  • 2. The role of the individual functional groups (ɛ-amino groups and disulfide bridges) of the amino acids in the lethal action of the toxins has been investigated and discussed. (springer.com)
  • levels
  • Asparagine can become acrylamide during the frying of potatoes and is a probable human carcinogen, so reduced levels of it are desirable. (wikipedia.org)
  • either
  • Asparagine is needed to maintain balance in the central nervous system, it prevents you from being either overly nervous or overly calm. (grandmas-herbal-remedies.com)
  • Cells were grown either in liquid Tris-acetic acid-phosphate (TAP) medium ( Gorman and Levine, 1965 ) or on TAP/agar plates. (rupress.org)
  • foods
  • During heating the amino acid asparagine, naturally present in starchy foods, undergoes a process called the Maillard reaction, which is responsible for giving baked or fried foods their brown color, crust, and toasted flavor. (wikipedia.org)
  • nuclear
  • The bile acid receptor (BAR), also known as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) or NR1H4 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4) is a nuclear receptor that is encoded by the NR1H4 gene in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • On the one hand, they administered the mice L-asparaginase, which is chemotherapy drug currently used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia , which is known to thrive on asparagine. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The last conserved domain spans from amino acid 320 to 500 and is known as AKAP7 2'5' RNA ligase-like domain (AKAP7_NLS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Asparaginase works by breaking down the amino acid known as asparagine without which the cancer cells cannot make protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • side
  • Direct radiation effects to the amino acid side chain: EMR and periodic DFT of X-irradiated L-asparagine at 6 K. (semanticscholar.org)
  • article{yen2015DirectRE, title={Direct radiation effects to the amino acid side chain: EMR and periodic DFT of X-irradiated L-asparagine at 6 K.}, author={Live F \Oyen and Siv G Aalbergsj\o and Ingerid Skjei Knudtsen and Eli Olaug Hole and Einar Sagstuen}, journal={The journal of physical chemistry. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The effects of these mutations on permeation properties were correlated with the size of the amino acid side chain substituted, rather than its chemical nature. (wiley.com)
  • The side group is what distinguishes all the different amino acids from each other. (wikibooks.org)
  • The 20 amino acids translated by the genetic code vary greatly by the physical and chemical properties of their side chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • groups
  • The R groups of the different amino acids can differ in size and structure, as well as electric charge (acidic or basic), which influences the solubility of the amino acids in water (Nelson and Cox, 2013). (wikibooks.org)
  • formation
  • As a result, asparagine cannot take part in the Maillard reaction, and therefore the formation of acrylamide is significantly reduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complete acrylamide removal is probably not possible due to other, minor asparagine-independent formation pathways. (wikipedia.org)